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Full text of "REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, ONTARIO, 1904"

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\Jr03AJu. \&ULgUu[^ 1 ^.<>\ 
REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 



Province of Ontario 



FOR THE YEAR 



1904 



PART I.- 

(WITH THE STATISTICS OFT903.) 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OFiONTARIO. 




-\h 






TORONTO: 
Printed and Published by L. K. CAMERON, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty. 

1905 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PART I. 



PAGE. 

Staff of Department iii. 

SUMMAR Y OF STA TISTICS : 

I. — Elementary Schools v. 

II. — Secondary Schools vii. 

III. — General, Elementary and Secondary Schools. ! vii. 

I. — Public Schools, (including Separate Schools.) 

1. School Population, Attendance • viii 

2. Classification of Pupils ix. 

3. Teachers' Certificates ix. 

and Salaries x. 

4. Receipts and Expenditure xi. 

II. — Roman Catholic Separate Schools xii. 

III. — Protestant Separate Schools xii. 

IV. — Collegiate Institutes and High Schools. 

1. Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance xii. 

Cost per pupil xiii. 

2. Classification of Pupils, Matriculation, etc xiii. 

Occupation of parents xiv. 

V. — Departmental Examinations, etc xiv. 

VI. — Teachers' Institutes ' .' xv. 

VII. — Public Libraries xv. 

Art Schools xvii. 

Literary and Scientific Institutions xvii. 

GENERA L REM A RKS : 

I. — The Revised Regulations xvii. 

II. — Continuation Classes xx. 

III. — School Libraries xx. 

IV. — Travelling Libraries xxi. 

V. — Public Libraries xxii. 

VI.— Free Text Books ; xxii. 

VII.— Home Work xxiv. 

VIII. — Consolidated Schools xxvi. 

IX. — Summer Schools xxvi. 

X. — Temperance and Hygiene ' xxvii. 

XL— Nature Study xxviii. 

XII.— School Gardens xxix. 

XIII.— Agriculture xxxii. 

XIV.— Inspection xxxiii. 

XV.— Women Teachers xxxvii. 

XVI. — Functions of the School xxxix. 

XVII. — Expert Knowledge in School Administration xii. 

XVIII. — Teachers' Certificates t xliii. 

XIX. — University Development xliv. 

XX.— Conclusion xiv. 

WARWICK BRO'S. & RUT7XR, 

Printers and Bookbinders, 

King and Spadina, 

Toronto. 



No. 12 THE REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. iii. 

APPENDICES. 
Appendix A. — Statistical Tables, 1903. 

PAGE. 

1. Public Schools. 

I. — Table A. — School Population, Total and Average Attendance, etc 3 

II. — Table B. — Reading Classes — Pupils in the various branches of instruction 6 

III. — Table C. — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, etc 12 

IV. — Table D. — School Houses, Prayers, Maps, etc 14 

V. — Table E. — Financial Statement 16 

2. Roman Catholic Separate Schools. 

I. — Table F. — Financial Statement, Teachers, etc 22 

II. — Table G. — Attendance, Pupils in the various branches of instruction, Maps, etc. . . 26 

3 Collegiate Institutes and High Schools. 

I. — Table H. — Financial Statement, Charges per year 30 

II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the various branches of instruction, and examina- 
tion results 36 

III. — Table K.— Miscellaneous, School Houses, Pupils in the different Forms, etc 48 

4. Protestant Separate Schools. 

Table L. — Protestant Separate Schools 54 

5. Miscellaneous. 

Table M. — Report on Truancy 55 

Table N. — Report on Kindergartens 56 

Table O. — Report on Night Schools 56 

6. General Statistical Abstract. 

Table P. — General Statistical Abstract 57 

Appendix B. — Teachers' Institutes, Financial Statement, 1903 58 

Appendix C. — Rural Public School Libraries, 1903-4 60 

Appendix D. — Inspection of Schools, 1904. 

I. List of Inspectors 65 

II. Diplomas for School Premises 68 

Appendix E. — Continuation Classes, 1903-4 69 

Appendix F. — Admission of Candidates to Collegiate Institutes and High Schools, 

1904 77 

Appendix G. — Free Text Books in Rural Schools, 1904 81 

Appendix H. — Proceedings for the Year 1904. 

I. — Regulations and Circulars 82 

Apportionment of Public School Grant 163 

II. — Orders in Council 195 



iv. THE REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 1904 



Appendix I. — Public and Free Libraries, Art Schools, Literary and Scientific 
Institutions, 1903. 

page 

Report of the Superintendent 196 

Libraries in the Province 199 

I. — Public Libraries (not free) 203 

II. — Public Libraries (free) ' 210 

III. — Art Schools and Departmental Drawing Examinations 217 

Art Schools. 

1. Extract from Report of Hamilton Art School 225 

2. do St. Thomas Art School 226 

3. do Toronto Art School 226 

4. do Ontario Society of Artists 226 

Literary and Scientific Institutions. 

1. Report of the* Hamilton Scientific Association 227 

2. do Ottawa Literary and Scientific Society 228 

3. do LTnstitut Canadien Francais, Ottawa 229 

4. do St. Patrick's Literary and Scientific Association, Ottawa 229 

5. do Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club 230 

6. do Ottawa University Society 231 

7. do Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Toronto 232 

8. do Toronto Canadian Institute ". 233 

9. do Wellington Field Naturalists' Club, Guelph 234 

10. Historical Societies 234 

Appendix J. — Report of the Librarian of the Education Department 234 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PART II. 



Page, 
Appendix K. — Manual Training and Technical Education. 

Report of the Inspector 241 

Appendix L. — Statistics of County Model Schools, 1904 252 

Appendix M. — Provincial Normal and Model Schools ; Ontario Normal College. 

I. Provincial Normal and Model Schools, Toronto . 

1. Staff of Toronto Normal School; students admitted 256 

2. Staff of Provincial Model School, Toronto; number of pupils 256 

II. Provincial Normal and Model Schools, Ottawa. 

1. Staff of Ottawa Normal School; students admitted 256 

2. Staff of Provincial Model School, Ottawa; number of pupils 257 

III. Provincial Normal School, London. 

Staff; Students admitted 257 

IV. Ontario Normal College. 

Staff and students admitted 257 

Appendix N. — High School Cadet Corps, 1904 258 

Appendix O. — Superannuated Teachers, 1904. 

1. Allowances granted during 1904 259 

2. Summary for years 1882-1904 259 

ArPENDix P. — Report of the President of the School of Practical Science 260 

Appendix Q. — Report of the President of the University of Toronto 265 

Addendum A. — Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts 272 

Addendum B. — Report of the University College 277 

Addendum C. — Victoria University 278 

Addendum D. — Faculty of Medicine 279 

Addendum E. — Applied Science and Engineering 283 

Addendum F. — The Library 284 

Addendum G. — Biological Museum... 285 

Addendum H. — Memorandum Regarding Geological and Mineralogical Museum 286 

Addendum J. — University of Toronto Studies 286 

Addendum K. — Marine and Lacustrine Biological Stations of Canada 287 

Addendum L. — Financial Statements. 

I. Faculty of Arts 288 

II. Faculty of Medicine 296 

III. Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering 298 

Addendum M. — List of Papers and Works by Members of Faculties and 

Research Students, for the year 1903-4 299 



IV. 



Till; REPORT Ol' II 1 1 C EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



No. 12 



Appendix P. — Certificates of Teachers in Province, February, 1905. 



303 



Appendix S. — List of Certificates Issued by the Department, 1904, Etc. 



1. Inspectors' Certificates 304 

2. High School Principals and Specialists 304 

3. High School Assistaots and Specialists 305 

4. Summary of Public School Teachers' Certificates 305 

5. First Class Certificates 305 

6. Second Class Certificates 306 

7. Kindergarten Directors 308 

8. Kindergarten Assistants 308 

9. Domestic Science 308 

10. Temporary and Extended Certificates 309 

11. Professional Examinations 309 

Appendix T. — Members of the Educational Council, and Boards of Examiners; 
Lists of Associate Examiners; and High School Principals and 

Assistants. 



I. Members of Educational Council, 1904-1905 309 

II. Boards of Examiners, 1905 309 

III. Associate Examiners, 1904 310 

IV. Principals and Assistants of Collegiate Institutes and High Schools, 

January, 1905... 312 




&0 




3 



GENERAL REPORT, 1904 



1 E. 



WARWICK BRO'S & RUTTER, 
TORONTO. 



Limited, Printers, 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



MINISTER OF EDUCATION : 

HON. R. A. PYNE, M.D., M.P.P. 

DEPUTY MINISTER OF EDUCATION: 

JOHN MILLAR, B.A. 

H. M. Wilkinson, -------- Senior Clerk and Accountant. 

A. C Paull, ------.. clerk of Records. 

T. J. Greene, - - . - - Assistant Clerk of Records. 

E. A. Faulds, -----... Clerk of Statistics. 

T. F. Oallaghan, - Clerk of Correspondence. 

S. A. May, - Assistant Clerk of Correspondence, 

F. Woodley, --------- Assistant Accountant. 

Allen Ker, Clerk and Stenographer. 

Miss S. B. Shields, - - - Stenographer. 

L. McCorkindale, - - - Caretaker. 



Departmental Examinations. 

W. H. Jenkins, B.A.. - - -. - - - - Registrar. 

F. N. Nudel, ----- Clerk and Sec. to Bd. of Examiners. 

W. W. Jeffers, - - Clerk of Examinations. 

R. J. Bryce, - - - - - - - - - Assistant Clerk of Examinations. 



Public Libraries, Art Schools, Etc, 



S. P. May, M.D., C.L.H., 
Wm. Lemon, 



Superintendent. 
Clerk. 



Library, Museum, Etc, 

J. George Hodgins, M.A., LL.L\, - Historiographer. 

H. R. Alley, Librarian. 

Miss J. Stocks, Assistant Librarian. 

F. F. Evans, - , - - - Clerk. 

David Boyle, Ph. B., ------- Superintendent of 'Museum . 

Miss E. Dennis, Stenographer. 

[iii] 
la E. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

FOR THE YEAR 1 904 

PART I 
WITH THE STATISTICS OF 1903. 



To the Honorable Wm. Mortimer Clark, K. C, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honor : 

I herewith present Part I. of the Report of the Education Department for 
the year 1904 with the statistics for the year 1903. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

1. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

a. Public Schools. 
Number of Public Schools in 1903 5,734 

Increase for the year 63 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages in the Public Schools during the year 403, 161 

Decrease for the year 4,963 

Average daily attendance of pupils 230, 730 

Decrease for the year 1,933 

Percentage of average attendance to total attendance 57 .2 

Number of persons employed as teachers (exclusive of Kindergarten and Night 

School teachers) in the Public Schools : men, 2,062 ; women, 6,498 

total 8,560 

Decrease : men 138 ; increase, women 201 ; total increase.... 63 
Number of teachers who attended Normal School 4,795 

Increase for the year 194 

Number of teachers with a University degree 85 

Increase for the year 4 

Average annual salary for male teachers $465 

Increase for the year $29 

Average annual salary of female teachers $324 

Increase for the year $11 

[v.] 



VI. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Amount expended for Public School houses (sites and buildings). 

" " for teachers' salaries 

" " "all other purposes 

Total amount expended on Public Schools 

Increase for the year 

Cost per pupil, (enrolled attendance) 

Increase for the year 



$263,831 



$.79 



b. Roman Catholic Separate Schools. 
Number of Roman Catholic Separate Schools in 1903 



Increase for the year 21 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages 

Increase for the year 1,153 

Average daily attendance of pupils 

Increase for the year 721 

Percentage of average attendance to total attendance 

Number of teachers 

Increase for the year 26 

Amount expended for School Houses (sites and buildings) 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries 

" " for all other purposes 

Total amount expended on R. C. Separate Schools 

Decrease for the year $11,122 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 

Decrease for the year ' $.46 

c. Protestant Separate Schools. 

Number of Protestant Separate Schools (included with Public Schools, a) in 1903 
Decrease for the year 1 

Number of enrolled pupils 

Decrease for the year 152 

Average daily attendance of pupils 

Decrease for the year 56 



d. Kindergartens. 



Number of Kindergartens in 1903 . . 

Increase for the year 

Number of pupils enrolled 

Increase for the year 

Average daily attendance of pupils . 

Increase for the year 

Number of teachers engaged 

Increase for the year 



580 



110 



Night Schools. 



Number of Night Schools in 1903-4. 

Decrease for the year 

Number of pupils enrolled •..:., 

Increase for the year , 



$347,955 
$3,096,132 
$1,209,463 
$4,653,550 

$11.54 



412 

47,117 

29,538 

62.69 
896 

$80,862 
$213,861 
$129,596 
$424,319 

$9.01 



5 

314 
191 

123 

11,880 

4,706 

250 

10 
701 



31 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. vii. 



Average daily attendance of pupils 162 

Decrease for the year 8 

Number of teachers engaged 17 

II. ^SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 
a. High School*. 

Number of High Schools (including 41 Collegiate Institutes) in 1903 135 

Increase for the year 1 

Number of Teachers in High Schools 619 

Increase for the year 26 

Number of Pupils in High Schools 25,722 

Increase for the year 1 , 250 

t Average Annual Salary, Principals $1,220 

Increase for the year $22 

t Average Annual Salary, Assistants $875 

Increase for the year $18 

t Average Annual Salary $950 

Increase for the year $16 

fHighest Salary Paid $2,900 

Amount expended for High School teachers' salaries $571,559 

" " " " houses (sites and buildings) $48,723 

Amount expended for all other High School purposes $195,800 

Total amount expended on High Schools $816,082 

Increase for the year $46,402 

Cost per Pupil (enrolled attendance) $31.72 

Increase for the year $ .27 

b. Continuation Classes. 

Number of Continuation Classes, 1903-4 (included in Public and Separate Schools, 
I, a and b), practically doing High School work : Grade A, 68 ; Grade B, 45 ; 

Grade C, 118 ; Grade D, 188 ; total 419 

Increase for the year, Grade A, 3 

Decrease, Grade B, 3 , Grade C, 16 : Grade D, 45 

Number of pupils in attendance ' 4,598 

Decrease for the year ... 266 

III. GENERAL. 

Elementary and Secondary Schools. 

Total population of the Province, 1903 $2,204,830 

Pupils enrolled in Elementary and Secondary Schools 488,581 

Decrease for the year 1 ,949 

Average daily attendance 280,453 

Decrease for the year 223 

Percentage of total population enrolled 22. 16 

Average length of school term in days 199.06 

Average number of days attended by each pupil enrolled 114.18 

*The Curriculum of Secondary Schools includes all the subjects required for matriculation into the University . 

fThese salaries are based on Returns to the Department, dated January. 1904. 

{Estimated. 



V11L 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) in all schools : 

1902 1903 

Sites and buildings $ 97 $ 98 

Teachers' salaries 7 63 7 94 

All other expenses 2 80 3 14 

For all purposes $11 40 $12 06 

Average cost per pupil (average attendance) in all schools : 

1902 1903 

Sites and buildings $ 1 70 $ 1 70 

Teachers' salaries 13 34 13 84 

All other expenses 4 89 5 47 

For all purposes $19 93 $21 01 

Expenditure per capita of population, 1903 



$2 67 



I. PUBLIC SCHOOLS (INCLUDING SEPARATE SCHOOLS). 

These tables, 1, 2, 3 and 4, for the purpose of comparison with previous 
years in which the R. C. Separate Schools were included with Public Schools, 
include R. O. Separate Schools. In the Statistical Tables, A, B, C, D, E, 
(Appendix A), the Separate Schools are excluded. 

1. — School Population — Attendance. 

The School population of the Province, as ascertained by the assessors, is 
as follows: 











C4 


0> 

> 




>6 


Ol'-J be 

5*J 


• 




a 

eg 






o 


o 


"o3 


Year. 








^ 


o 


-!'& 


'3 






be 

c3 

O 
O 


& 
ft 

o 

o 




2 


1=1 
<x> 

GO 


o >-> 


-3 

? . 

g o 
t> 03 


ercentage 
attendan 
number 
school . 




w 


w 


Ph 


Ph 


Ph 


Eh 


< 


Ph 


1867 


5—16 


447,726 




a380,511 


621,132 


401,643 


163,974 


40.82 


1872 


5—16 


495,756 




a433,664 


620,998 


454,662 


188,701 


41.50 


1877 


5—16 


494,804 


1.430 


488,553 


877 


490,860 


217,184 


44.25 


1882 


5—16 


483,817 


1,352 


469,751 


409 


471,512 


214,176 


45.42 


1887 


5—21 


611,212 


1,569 


491,242 


401 


493,212 


245,152 


49.71 


1892 


5—21 


595,238 


1,636 


483,643 


391 


485,670 


253,830 


52.26 


1897 


5—21 


590,055 


1,385 


481,120 


272 


482,777 


273,544 


56.66 


1902 


5—21 


584,512 


1,001 


452,977 


110 


454,088 


261,480 


57.58 


1903 


5—21 


577,383 


917 


449,255 


106 


450,278 


260,268 


57.80 



a 5—16. 6 Other ages than 5 to 16. Note.— Kindergarten and Night School pupils are not included in above 
table. 



The decrease in the enrolled attendance in 1908 is very largely offset by 
the increased attendance noticed in the R. C. Separate Schools, and the High 
Schools and Collegiate Institutes. See tables II. and IV. of this portion of the 
Report. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



IX. 



Of the 450,278 pupils in 1903, 260,617 or 57.88 per cent, were enrolled in 
rural schools, and 189,661 or 42.12 per cent, in the cities, towns, and incorporated 
villages of the Province. 



2. — Classification of Pupils. 





c3 
Ph 








o 
o 
A 
o 

w 
















Year. 


Ph 03 


P4 


1 

Ph 




A 

Ifri 


be 


a 
s 


60 


>> 

A 

Ph 

& 


>> 

o 


CJ 


3 .a 

S o 

P 






xi 


•o 


xj 


gtf 


M 


*E 


c3 




•2 


p 


go 




m 


<N 


cc 


tji 


lO 


ft 


3 


ft 


o 


w 


^ 


O 


1867.. 


79,365 


98,184 


83,211 


68,896 


71,987 


231,734 


241,501 


5,450 


272,173 


61,787 


47,618 


147,412 


1872.. 


160,828 


100,245 


96,481 


67,440 


29,668 


322,688 


327,218 


57,582 


327,139 


109,639 


110,083 


282,156 


1877.. 


153,630 


108,678 


135,824 


72,871 


19,857 


396,006 


402,248 


153,036 


375,951 


116,865 


168,942 


220,977 


1882.. 


165,834 


106,229 


117,352 


71,740 


10,357 


398,401 


419,557 


176,432 


280,517 


150,989 


158,694 


209,184 


1887.. 


192,361 


100,533 


108,096 


81,984 


10,238 


466,389 


469,445 


395.097 


316,791 


194,754 


203,567 


270,856 


1892 . 


187,947 


96,074 


99,345 


88,934 


13,370 


465,516 


470,813 


435,239 


334,947 


253,956 


220,941 


294,331 


1897.. 


181,375 


91,330 


99,682 


89,314 


21,076 


465,525 


471,869 


448,444 


342,189 


284,025 


233,915 


316,787 


1902.. 


176,503 


85,732 


90,630 


83.738 


17,485 


445,316 


449,573 


434,030 


318,755 


269,954 


268,356 


296,172 


1903.. 


173,309 


86,582 


90,065 


83,981 


16,341 


443,711 


446,168 


43^,270 


314,318 


272,657 


264,181 


292,513 



PI 

11 

pVd 

as 



33,926 
71,525 
171,594 
211,343 
194,459 
195,506 



The following table classifies the pupils in the various Readers in 1903, as 
to rural and urban schools. 





o>»-h 
fetf Ph 


.£ c» o3 

&<PhPh 


■2 51 

coPh 


si 

HPh 


o o 




Rural Schools 


61,846 
44,904 


39,189 
27,370 


49,441 
37,141 


51,359 

38,706 


48,596 
3t>,385 


10,186 


Urban Schools (cities, towns and incorporated villages) 


6,155 







3. — Teachers' Certificates and Salaries. 
Teachers' Certificates. 

















lis if 

tf ° 5 


1l3 




"o 












« . Ph 


s§i 




o . 












2 ** 


«*h o3cC 


lear. 


A £ 












"E fl . 


°o~ 




•2o 

.0 o> 


6 
"3 


6 
B 


to 




1 
T3 


ther ce 
includi 
County 
etc. 


a£° 

3 a>25 




Ph 


3 


f=H 




CO 


o 


« 


1867 


4,890 
5,476 
6,468 


2,849 
2,626 
3,020 


2,041 
2,850 
3,448 


1,899 

1,337 

250 


2,454 
1,477 


386 
2,084 


151 

578 


666 


1872 


828 


1877 


1.304 


3,926 


9$8 


1,084 


1882 


6,857 
7,594 


3,062 
2,718 


3,795 

4,876 


246 
252 


2,169 
2,553 


3,471 
3,865 


971 
924 


1,873 


1887 


2,434 


1892 


8,480 
9,128 


2,770 
2,784 


5,710 
6,344 


261 
343 


3,047 
3,386 


4,299 
4,465 


873 
934 


3,038 


1897 


3,643 


1902 


9,367 


2,294 


7,073 


608 


4,296 


3,432 


1,031 


4,774 


1903 


9,456 


2,160 


7,296 


610 


4,451 


3,250 


i,145 


4,967 







Note.— Kindergarten and Night School teachers are not included in above table. 

The above table shows a decline from 24.5 per cent, in 1902 to 22.84 in 
1903 in the number of men engaged in teaching. 



X. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Improvement is again noticed in the increase of the number of teachers 
with First and Second Class certificates and of those who have attended 
Normal School. 

Eighty-five Public School-teachers held University degrees in Arts, an 
increase of four over the preceding year 1902. 

The following table classifies the teachers and certificates as to rural and 
urban schools, in 1903 : 





Public School Teachers. 


Certificates. 




Total . 


Male . 


Female . 


1st Class. 


2nd Class. 


3rd Class. 


Other 

Class. 




5,963 
3,493 


1,581 
579 


4,382 
2,914 


143 
467 


2,192 
2,259 


3,008 

242 


630 


Urban (cities, towns and in- 


515 







Teachers' Salaries. 







05 


05 


05 
©03 


05 £> 

"3 « 


05 


05 
"3 


05 


05 

"3 




13 


03 05 


go 


c3 m 




o3 


a 


"3 


a 




3 


sg 


Is 


S.JS 




05 


W M 


&* 


Year. 


3 






il 




t-fri 
a8 tj 


2 +3 


,3.2 


*1 

if. 




1 


83 


I* 


*»- 


** 


*rf 


CO ^ 


i^ 










05 05 


05 05 


05 05 


05 05 








GO 


txvd 


fcJDrCl 


bc& 


bcfl 


CJ0.S 


&CrC 


cjo^5 


tod 








z% 


03 O 


03 O 


03 05 


g§ 


03 05 


03 05 




jG 


*h c3 


*H c3 


*-> 03 


u o3 




^ S3 






05 05 


05 05 


05 05 


05 05 


05 05 












>-+a 


>*> 


|>4J 


>-*> 


>-+a 


k+? 


>+* 


>■*> 




X 


< 


< 


^ 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 




$ 


$ 


i 


9 


f 


% 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1867 


1,350 


346 


226 


261 


189 


532 


243 


464 


240 


1872 


1,000 


360 


228 


305 


213 


628 


245 


507 


216 


1877 


1,100 
1,100 


398 

415 


264 
269 


379 

385 


251 
248 


735 
742 


307 
331 


683 
576 


269 


1882 


273 


1887 


1,450 


425 


292 


398 


271 


832 


382 


619 


,289 


1892 ' 


1,500 


421 


297 


383 


269 


894 


402 


648 


298 


1897 


1,500 


391 


294 


347 


254 


892 


425 


621 


306 


1902 


1,600 


436 


•313 


372 


271 


935 


479 


667 


317 


1903 


1,600 


465 


324 


387 


283 


951 


491 


678 


327 



The average salaries for teachers in 1903 in incorporated villages, included 
in Counties, etc., above, were $555 for men and $285 for women. In rural 
schools they were $372 and $283, and in all urban schools, $743 and $395 
respectively. 

It will be noticed that the salaries are higher than in any previous year 
since 1867 in all cases except for men in the rural and village schools, who 
received considerably higher salaries in the year 1883 to 1890 inclusive. 

See pages 12 and 13 of this Report for salaries in the various Counties 
and Districts. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



XI. 



4. — Receipts and Expenditure. 





Receipts . 






Expenditure. 






Year. 


B 
S3 

p 
be 

<p 

'So 

a> 


O 03 

A 

03 C 

o g s 

S3 bOM 

2 


00 

> s 

u as 
a>r2 si 

W 03 (L> 

« -53 $ 

S3£gg 
o 


J5 

•S 4 
"53 
o 

3 

o 


3 
"E 
as 

09 

a> 

03 


be 

a . 
'•& S 

P 

a o 

OS O 
Hi o 

35 


03 Q) 

if 

of 2 
S * • 

£ S « 


2 * 

O) o3 a 


0) 

p. 
M 

O 


P. 

P 

I-. 

<v 

Oh 
00 

o 
o 


1867 

1872 


187,153 
225,318 
251,962 
265,738 
268,722 
283,791 
366,538 
383,666 
390,156 


$ 

1,151,583 
1,763,492 
2,422,432 
2,447,214 
3,084,352 
3,300,512 
3,361,562 
3,959,912 
4,263,893 


$ 

331,599 

541,460 

730,687 

757,038 

978,283 

1 227,596 

1,260,055 

1,422,924 

1,406,957 


$ 

1,670,335 
2,530,270 
3,405,081 
3,469,990 
4.331,357 
4,811,899 
4,988,155 
5,766,502 
6,061,006 


$ 

1,093,517 
1,371,594 
2,038,099 
2,144,449 
2,458,540 
2,752,629 
2,886,061 
3.198,132 
3,309,993 


$ 

149,195 
456,043 
477,393 
341,918 
544,520 
427,321 
391,689 
432,753 
428,817 


$ 

31,354 
47.799 
47,539 
15,583 
27,509 
40,003 
60,585 
86,723 
74.486 


199,123 
331,928 
510,458 
525,025 
711,535 
833,965 
877,335 
1,107,552 
1,264,573 


$ 

1,4T3,189 
2,207,364 
3,073,489 
3,026,975 
3,742,104 
4,053,918 
4,015,670 
4,825,160 
5,077,869 
J 


$ c. 

3 67 

4 85 


1877 


6 26 


1882. 


6 42 


1887.. 

1892 

1897 


7 59 

8 40 
8 73 


1902 


10 62 


1903 


11 27 







A large increase in the government and municipal grants and in the ex- 
penditure of the Public and Separate Schools is noticed above. The latter item 
iu connection with the decreased attendance has increased the cost per pupil 
from $10.63 in 1902 to $11.27 in 1903. 

Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance.) 



1902. 

"Sites and buildings $ 95 

Teachers' salaries 7 04 

All other expenses 2 63 

For all purposes $10 62 



1903. 

$ 95 
7 35 
2 97 

$11 27 



Average cost per pupil (average attendance.) 



1902. 

Sites and buildings $ 1 65 

Teachers' salaries 12 23 

All other expenses 4 57 

For all purposes $18 45 



1903. 


$ 1 65 


12 72 


5 14 



$19 51 



The cost per pupil in the Public Schools alone will be found on pages 20 
and 21 of this report, and for the R.C. Separate Schools on pages 24 and 25. 



Xll. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



II — ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 



Year. 



1867 
1872 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 



Schools— Expenditure- 
Teachers. 







a5 






S-c 






3 










-£ 


"O 


a; 


ft 


fl 


ft 
o 


<x> 


ft 


OB 


0> 




5 


$ 


3 




o 


o 


DQ 


H 


H 




$ 


$ 


161 


48,628 


42,719 


171 


68,810 


61,817 


185 


120,266 


114,806 


190 


166,739 


154,340 


229 


229,848 


211,223 


312 


326,034 


289,838 


340 


335,324 


302,169 


391 


485,503 


435,441 


112 


472,395 


424,319 



Number of pupils attending— Number in the various branches 
of instruction. 



18,924 
21,406 
24,952 
26,148 
30,373 
37,466 
41,620 
45,964 
47,117 



18,924 

21,406 

24,952 

26,148 

30,373 

37,466 

41, 

45,964 

47,117 



10,749 
13,699 
17,932 
21,052 
27,824 
85,565 
39,724 
45.964 
41,117 



10,559 

12,189 

17,961 

21,524 

28,501 

35, 

40,165 

45,964 

47,117 



8,666 
8,011 
13,154 
13,900 
19,608 
26,299 
27,471 
29,788 
30,212 



5, 

7,908 
11,174 
11,695 
18,678 
22,755 
26,071 
27,409 
28,609 



7,548 
21,818 
32,682 
36,462 
41,952 
43,658 



(3 £ 
£ 0) 
ft^ 

Eh ' 



2,033 
8,578 
11,056 
18,127 
14,687 
20,559 



III.— PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 

The complete list of Protestant Separate Schools is as follows : 

No. 9 Cambridge, No. 6 Plantaganet North, No. IN, Tilbury, L'Orignal, 

and Penetanguishene. 

They were attended by 314 pupils. The whole amount expended for their 

maintenance was $3,451. Five teachers held a Second Class, two a Third Class 

and one a Temporary Certificate. 

IV.— COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS. 



The following statistics respecting Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 

estive : 

1. — Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance, Etc. 



will be found suggestive 





ft 
o 


a 


Receipts. 


Expenditure. 




S3 

£° 

as ♦> 

"o © oJ 
^ ° ° 

^fcS at 




Year. 




s 

> 


9 

ft 


"in 

o 
^ 2 


P 

a> w 
•55 bf . 

*H S °> 


ft 


ft 
ft 




¥+ 


<1> 


rt 


a 




*a 


•S'o £ 


^ « 


^j 


B a a 


e 




o 


M 


2 






"- 1 cS 


__s s 






cp a> cu 






o 


ej 


o 


be 

0> 


§ 


2* 
5 M 


S 3 O 


35 


ft 


"343 


o 




cc 


EH 


< 


h! 


Eh 


ft 


ft 


H 


ft 


ft 


O 


1867 


103 


159 


15,605 


54,562 


139,579 


94,820 


$ 

al9,190 


124,181 


5,696 


55 


I 

21 80 


1872 


104 


239 


20,270 


79,543 


223,269 


141,812 


a31,360 


210,005 


7,968 


56 


26 36 


1877 


104 
104 
112 
128 


280 
332 
398 
522 


20,753 
29,270 
56,198 
97,273 


78.762 
84,304 
91,977 
100,000 


357,521 
373,150 
529,323 
793,812 


211,607 
253,864 
327,452 
472,029 


a51,417 
al9,361 
a73,061 
a91,108 


343,710 
343,720 
495 612 
696,114 


9,229 
12,348 
17,459 
22,837 


56 
53 
59 
60 


37 24 


1182 


27 56 


1887 


28 38 


1892 


30 48 


1897 


130 


579 


110,859 


101,250 


767,487 
832,853 


532,837 


a46,627 


715,976 


24,390 


61 


29 35 


1902 


134 


593 


105,801 


112,650 


547,402 


44,246 


769,680 


24,472 


58.96 


31 45 


1903 


135 


619 


111,028 


118,773 


876,737 


571,559 


48,723 


816,082 


25,722 


59.55 


31 72 







a Expenses for repairs, etc., included. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



Xlll. 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) per year : 

1902. 1903. 

Sites and buildings . § $ 1 81 $ 1 89 

Teachers' salaries ' 22 37 22 22 

All other expenses 7 27 7 61 

For all purposes $31 45 $31 72 

Average cost per pupil (average attendance) per year : 

1902. 1903. 

Sites and buildings $ 3 07 $ 3 18 

Teachers' salaries 37 93 37 31 

All other purposes 12 34 12 78 

For all purposes $53 34 $53 27 

2. — Classification of Pupils, etc. 





English. . 


Mathematics . 


Science. 


Year. 






o 

1 

ft 


0> 
H 

P 

5 

Fh 






pi 

03 






>> 










3.2 

•512 


o 




fc 


ft 


•ll 
ll 


£ 




u 

o 
Pi 


w 




>> 




Sp3 


'So 


<D 


s 


» 


ss 


<x> 


o 


o 

be 


>> 


1 


. P 
$ 




c 


1=1 


O 






Fh 






•£ 


A 




o 




H 


H 


ft 


w 


O 


<3 


< 


O 


H 


ft 


o 


CO 


1867 


5,467 


4,091 




4,634 


5,264 


5,526 


2,841 


1,847 


141 


1,876 


840 




1872 


7,884 


T,278 




7,513 


7,715 


7,834 


6,033 


2,592 


174 


1,921 


1,151 




1877 


8,819 


8,772 




9,106 


9,158 


9,227 


8,678 


8,113 


359 


2,168 
2,880 
5,265 
6,601 
11 002 


2 547 




1182 


12,275 


12, 189 




12,220 


12,106 


12,261 


11,742 


11,148 


397 


2,522 
3,411 
3 710 




1887 


17,086 


17,171 


16,649 


17,010 


16,962 


16,939 


16,904 


14,839 


1,017 


4,640 
6,189 
&2,892 
9,051 
9,442 


1892 


22,530 


22,525 


22,468 


22,328 


22,118 


21,869 


22.229 


17,791 
16,788 


1,154 
1,652 
1,662 
1,618 


1897 


19,591 


24,195 


24,176 


18,318 


13,747 


19,798 


24,105 


5,489 
5,860 
6,214 


1902 


21,576 


24,241 


23,768 


23,559 


14,500 


21,594 


22,953 


16,881 
17,873 


12 758 


1903 


23,069 


25,375 


24,885 


24,426 


15,290 


23,246 


23,840 


14,240 



2 — Classification of Pupils, etc. — Continued. 







Languages . 








«j 






172 




% 
















Fh 

oj 






2 




i 








































a - 

o 


05 




-d 




A 
o 


Year . 


















H 

P 

P 


p 

03 

o3 




32 

o 
o 




pj 

3 


M 

<v 




pi 
c3 


bo 

g 


"S 
3 
S 

s 

o 


fap.2 
.So 

o 
PQ 


o 

FH 

03 

a 

o 


1 
Fh 

o 
"S3 


P . 

'&§ 

,P 


o> 

"3 

P 
o 

3 


o 

|* 

P 


1867 


5,171 
3,860 


802 
900 


2,164 

2,828 


34i 


676 
2,176 




1,283 
3 127 








56 
78 
145 
272 
305 
471 
652 
1,071 
851 


67 
28 
35 
37 
58 
77 
87 
82 
81 


1872 


486 


300 


213 
564 
751 
791 
398 
409 
705 
684 


1877 


4,955 


871 


3,091 


442 


2,755 
3,441 

14,295 
16,980 




3,621 
5,642 
14,064 
16,700 
11,647 
11,334 
12,264 


555 


328 


1882 


4,591 


815 


5,363 
6,180 


962 




881 
1,141 
1 111 


646 
882 
1,006 
1,153 
743 
844 


1887 


5,409 


997 


. 1,350 
2,796 


1,955 
948 


1892 


%,006 


1,070 


10,398 


1897 


16,873 


1,421 


13,761 


5,169 


12,252 
10,721 
11,619 


160 


1,368 
1,573 
1,805 


1902 


18,884 
18,831 


631 


13,595 


3,280 


138 


1903 


602 


14,522 


3,229 


287 



XIV. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



The following table will be of interest regarding the occupation of- parents 
of High School pupils, and will show the classes of our population receiving most 
advantages from those institutions. 

Agricultural 8,004 

Commercial 6,941 

Mechanical 6,491 

Professional 2,504 

Other callings 1,782 



V. DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS, ETC. 

1. Table shewing the Number of Teachers-in-Training at County Model Schools. 
Normal College, Provincial Normal Schools, etc., 1877-1903. 





County Model Schools. 


Normal College. 


Normal and Model Schools, etc. 


Year. 


S3 


i 


a 

* a 

15 


& 


9 


w . 

«£ to 


o 
o 

o 

CO 

"3 


03 -d 


11 

O 03 

co be • 


11 
co ^ 


tn fees of 
hools, 
ools, and 
ten pupils. 


"5 oo 




o 

O 






A 
o 

03 


-d-d 


(-1 -> 


a 


a 03 
S3 


•si • 


3<a 


o r ^A b 

^CO o « 
"~_cobc 


g • 
9 -a 




o 

OB 

O 

d 




5S 

. X 
o a> 


d 


,-d 

O o3 


II 

o> o 


£3 


d w 


d§2 


O 03 ft 


eceipts 
Norma 
Model 
Kinde] 


^5 

AS 
X 03 




to 


to 


to 


to 


fc 


M 


to 


ft 


fc 


to 


ti 


H 














$ c. 










$ c. 


$ c. 


1877 


50 


1,146 


1,124 








13 


257 


8 


643 


7,909 22 


25,780 88 


1882 


46 


882 


837 








16 


260 


15 


799 


13,783 50 


44,888 02 


1887 .. 


55 


1,491 
1,283 
1,645 


1,376 
1,225 
1,384 








13 


441 


18 


763 


16,427 00 


40,188 66 


1892 


59 
60 


10 
12 


96 
180 


1.630 00 
4,374 00 


12 
13 


428 
407 


22 
23 


842 
832 


19,016 00 
18,797 59 


45,724 12 


1897 


46,390 91 


1902 


54 


1,171 


1,138 


15 


132 


2,405 00 


16 


619 


31 


958 


20,735 00 


56,672 98 


1903 


55 


1,148 


1,123 


17 


127 


2,110 00 


a25 


586 


36 


1,067 


19,866 00 


61,678 08- 







a Including those engaged in both a Normal and a Model School. 



2. Entrance Examinations, 1877-1904. 



Year. 


No. of 
candidates 
examined. 


No. of 
candidates 
who passed. 


1877 


7,383 
9,607 
16,248 
16,409 
16,384 
18,087- 
19,05S 
19,774 


3.836 


1882 


4,371 


1887 


9,364 


1892 - 


8,427 


1897 


• 


10,502 


1902 


13,300 


1903 


13,003 


1904 


14,632 







1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



xv. 



3. Non professional and Matriculation Examinations, 1004. 





6 




CJ 










o3 


u 


■a bo 










«g 


o 


•Ct3 q. 


m 


(-i 






0> 


H-s bo 

a 


•" 03 


o 
1§> 


2gf 






o 


M 03 


2 c-C 


1-1 03 




o>.2 

as 












+J QJ 


gee 




05 


03 1-1 


g*« 


S^ 


5^ 




Q 


Ph 


1-5 


Ph 


Ph 


o 




222 
76 


2,709 
1,337 


1,601 

1,369 


604 
353 


535 
281 


12 


No. who passed 


9 


No . of appeals 


1 


194 


39 


32 


42 


2 


No. sustained 


1 


39 


7 " 





3 


1 







Note— (a) The Part I. Junior Leaving examination was abolished in 1902. 

(6) In Junior Matriculation column above, 183 scholarship candidates are included, 
(c) The Commercial Diploma Part II was abolished in 1904. 



VI. TEACHERS' INSTITUTES. 

This table presents the work of the Teachers' Institutes for twenty -seven 
years : 





B9 

A 

03 


E 

a 


CO 

a 

"> • 

o 

u 

fi 

o> 

o 

03 


Receipts. 


Expenditure . 


Year. 


1* 

o> bo 

- 5 0. 


a 
la 


a 
2 

d • 
II 

£ si 


<6 

> 
"55 


CD 

fl 

« 




.2 

jO 

u 



'3 


-d 

a 

a 
9 

c 




"3 

o 


o 

6 


o> 

6 




1! 

la 


aa 


a 
3 


3 
O 

a 


a 

o3 
3 




£ 


fc 


fc 


<i 


<i* 


«! 


H 


-4 


H 










$ c. 


$ c. 


• $ c. 


$ . c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1877 


42 


1,181 


6,468 


1,412 50 


100 00 


299 75 


2,769 44 




1,127 63 


1882... 


62 


4,395 


6,857 


2,900 00 


300 00 


1,068 84 


9,394 28 


453 02 


5,355 33 


1X87 


66 


6,781 


7,594 
8,480 


1,800 00 


1,879 45 


730 66 


10,405 95 
12,043 54 


1,234 08 
1,472 41 


4,975 50 


1892 


69 


8,142 


1,950 00 


2,105 00 


875 76 


6,127 46 


]S97 


73 


7,627 


9,128 


2,425 00 


2,017 45 


901 15 


12,446 20 


1,479 88 


6.598 84 


1902 


77 


8,515 


9,367 


2,515 00 


1,877 50 


1,171 80 


13,171 26 


1,437 18 


7.188 45 


1903 


80 


8,783 


9,456 


2,450 00 


1,834 00 


1,296 85 


12,521 50 


1,095 55 


6,736 63 



The County Teachers' Associations are doing excellent work, and at a trifling 
expenditure. In the United States it is not unusual for Teachers' Institutes to 
be held for a week or longer The work attempted is, however, somewhat like 
what is done in our County Model Schools. 



VII. PUBLIC LIBRARIES, ART SCHOOLS, SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS, 

ETC. 

The change in the Act and Regulations requiring Annual Reports from 
Public Libraries to be made out to the end of each calendar year, has been 
complied with, and proved to be very satisfactory. The present Report is from 
the 1st of January to the 31st of December, 1903. 



XVI. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



The following extracts are from the Superintendent's Report : 

1. Public Libraries. 

Abstract showing the Counties and Districts in which Public Libraries are 
established :— Addington (6\ Algoma (13), Brant (7), Bruce (25), Carleton (9), 
Dufferin (10>, Dundas (8), Durham (4J, Elgin (12), Essex (8), Frontenac (7), 
Glengarry (3), Grenville (12), Grey (21), Haliburton (2), Haldimand (11), Halton 
(5), Hastings (8), Huron (18), Kent (13), Lambton (15), Lanark (18), Leeds (8), 
Lennox (2), Lincoln (9), Manitoulin Island (4), Middlesex (140, Muskoka '(6), 
Nipissing (4), Norfolk (6), Northumberland (8 , Ontario (12), Oxford (14), Parry 
Sound (12), Peel (14), Perth (8), Peterborough (5), Prescott (2), Prince Edward (2), 
Rainy River (2), Renfrew (9), Russell (2), Stormont (8),Simcoe (19), Victoria v 12), 
Waterloo (14), Welland (9), Wellington (17), Wentworth (9), York (23). 



Abstract showing the Progress of Public Libraries from 1883 to 31st 

December, 1903. 



Year . 



1883 (April) 

1888 " 

1893 " 

1898 " 

1899 " 

1899 (December) 

1900 ■ " 
1901 

1902 

1903 



93 

167 
255 
347 
364 
371 
389 
415 
446 
428 











w 


. 








bo 




bo 


O 

ft 




a> 




.a 

a 




ft 


'<& 


— X 

13 


a 


a 




a 


> 




ft 


<v 




o 


o 
> 


£ 


















o 


o . 


O 


o 


o*S 


og 


o 


<u 


o> 




u 


5s M 

3a 


o> ft 




^ ■ 


<D 


X> 


X2 % 


.Q 


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■o 2 




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a^ 


a 


ax 


AS 


a ^ 


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B 


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s 


& fH 


p oj 


3^ 


s-s 




£ 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


H 
















$ C. 


13,672 


28 


1,758 


59 


1,540 


154,093 


251,920 


59,716 00 


32,016 


41 


1,102 


104 


3,041 


311,048 


744,466 


103,843 68 


84,088 


41 


1,117 


156 


4,745 


510,326 


1,415,867 


160,556 26 


111,208 


2 


79 


200 


5,834 


789,082 


2,358,140 


188,783 21 


121,397 


2 


35 


200 


5,839 


862,047 


2,547,131 


193,421 20 


129,713 


2 


47 


188 


5,773 


918,022 


2,042,904 


178,642 87 


147,208 


2 


35 


186 


5,971 


989,050 


2,534,711 


210.635 49 


155,361 


1 


19 


194 


6,062 


1,066,117 


2,668,364 


225,796 29 


172,792 






191 


6,044 


1,140,392 


2.738,590 


246,315 29 


173,940 






186 


5,982 


1,164,573 


2,534,228 


240,941 13 



$ c. 

225,190 00 

403,573 75 

685,412 17 

870,167 54 

935,975 81 

966,667 38 

1,024.300 14 

1,080,601 71 

1,151,877 04 

1,269,605 22 



428 Public Libraries (140 Free, 288 Not Free) reported for the year ending 
31st December, 1903. 

52 Public Libraries did not report for the year ending 31st December, 1903. 

4 Libraries, which have not yet reported, were established in the year 1904. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



xvn. 



2. Art Schools, Etc. 

The following abstract shows the number of certificates awarded to Art 
Schools, Ladies' Colleges, Public and High Schools, etc., for drawing, painting, 
etc., at intervals since 1S83 to 1904 







Primary Art 


Advanced 


Mechanical 


Industrial 
Art 

Course. 


Extra 




o 

"5 


Ccmrse . 


Art Course. 


Art Course. 


subjects. 




O 




















o 




2j 




'-■3 




•~ 












u 


se 




eg 


C 


* 
























Year. 




u 


O 


u 


O 


(H 


<y 


t- 


























< 


o i 


o 


s2 


o 


£ 


o 




' 










02 

A 


55 


v 

£ 


u 


a 

a 
'3 




i 




«3 £ 


«gts 


II 

3=c 




a3 g 

3« 


en t: 

8 s 




& 


Ph 


fe 


Ph 


fe 


Ph 


h 


Ph 




1883 


57 
85 
55 


124 
2,977 
4.753 
3,166 




31 
151 
301 
540 




1 

50 
139 
42 








1888. . . 


133 
220 
149 


9 
13 

18 


2 

10 


24 
11 
30 


108 


1893 


165 


18*8 


171 


1899 


62 


3,993 


160 


499 


22 


75 




42 


154 


1900 


47 


3,130 


130 


367 


17 


53 




43 


156 


1901 


57 


2.5-18 


29 


413 


13 


70 


1 


31 


142 


1902 


65 

67 


1,974 

2,675 


41 

38 


280 
187 


10 
3 


57 
24 




31 

24 


151 


1903 




148 


1904 


69 


3,996 


60 


142 


3 


34 




8 


130 









An Order-in-Council has recently been passed that in future the Education 

Department is not authorized to hold examinations for Art Schools, Ladies' 

Colleges, etc. 

3. Literary and Scientific Institutions. 

These Institutions are doing good work. (See Superintendent's Report.) 
They have Libraries of Books relating to Arts and Science, History, etc., and 
several of these Institutions have Museums, which are frequently thrown open 
Free to the public. They give popular lectures on Science and Art, History, 
Literature, etc., and publish their Annual Transactions. Their chief aim is to 
encourage higher education among the masses, and the amount of patronage 
they receive is a proof that their efforts are appreciated. 



GENERAL REMARKS. 

I. THE REVISED REGULATIONS. 

The publication of the new courses of study which are given in another 
part of this report constitutes the most important work of the Education De- 
partment for the year 1904. For a long time it has been felt by teachers, 
inspectors and other educationists that a revision of the high and public 
school curriculum was urgent. Many persons failed to recognize the need 
of that educational progress which is essential in view of the alterations 
which have arisen within half a century in the industrial and social rela- 
tions of the people. In other countries, courses of study have been amend- 
ed more frequently than in this province. This fact may be accounted for 
partly as a result of that centralization which has had its advantages as 
well as its disadvantages in Ontario. 
2 E. 



xviii. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



It is well known that the main provisions of the new curriculum were 
before the country for a considerable time. Teachers' associations and other 
educational bodies discussed at various times, and at considerable length, 
the contemplated changes in the regulations. Much credit is due to the 
careful consideration of the original draft by a committee of the Ontario 
Educational Association. Indeed, the report of the "committee of nine- 
teen" will be found carried out in the main. Modifications of the report 
were made only, where expert knowledge of the conditions of the schools 
rendered such modifications essential. It will be found that the new cur- 
riculum opens up means for important educational development. 

The new programme is set forth with a large amount of detail, and will 
as a consequence be very useful to teachers. Due prominence is given to 
subjects somewhat modern. The subjects long held as important are still 
retained, but nature study, art, manual training and household science 
receive a place in the curriculum. The obligatory subjects in the public 
school programme are only those which all children should take up. Spec- 
ialization is, as before, relegated to the high school. It will be found that 
the curriculum is well suited to the conditions and probable development 
of the province. The preparation for citizenship is kept in view. Sub- 
jects which all pupils should understand have their proper place in the public 
school courses of study. In the high school the various pursuits that may 
be followed by students are satisfactorily recognized. . The requirements 
for matriculation, for the non-professional examinations of teachers, and for 
various industrial and commercial callings, receive due recognition. Man- 
ual training, household science and art, as well as agriculture, become 
^tional departments. 

An important step in advance is that made in diminishing the number 
of examinations. Examinations when held by the teachers themselves 
have a well known value. Indeed, every good teacher holds written exam- 
inations as a regular part of his work. He is largely relieved now, however, 
of the evils of outside examiners., The teacher becomes more independent, 
ana, as a result, he will have greater freedom in carrying on his work. Not 
less important is the greater value that will hereafter be attached to inspec- 
tion. It is well worthy of note that in England where examinations have 
been carried much farther than in this country there has been a call for 
better inspection, and fewer examinations. It is felt there that the value 
of inspection decreases in proportion to the attention paid to examinations. 
Ontario may well take lessons from the experience of England. 

The debate over the proper selection of studies in youth has been a long 
and wearis»me one; but at last two propositions are to command almost 
Universal acceptance. The first is that children and young people should 
study the elements of a considerable variety of subjects, such as language, 
mathematics, history, natural science, sanitation, and economics, not with 
the primary purpose of obtaining information on fthose subjects, but in order 
that they may sample several kinds of knowledge, initiate the mental pro- 
cesses and habits appropriate to each, and have a chance to determine wisely 
iu what direction their own individual mental powers can be best appl'ed. 
The second is tha* training for power of work and service should be the 
prime object of (dn cation throughout life no matter in what line the trained 
powers of the individual may be applied. 

In the new programme of studies for high schools and collegiate insti- 
tutes provision has been made to meet the demands of the various classes 
of students in pH 11 recognized that the second- 

ary schools of this province correspond more srenerally to those in the United 

2 a E. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xix. 



States than to institutions of the same kind in the different countries of 
Europe. There class distinctions have held sway for centuries, and, as a 
consequence, the children of the rich and those of the poor are usually 
vseparated by being placed in different kinds of schools. In Ontario it is the 
rule that the sons and daughters of the mechanic and farmer may be found 
in the same class room with the children of persons belonging to professional 
callings. Side by side may be found the boy whose father works in the fac- 
tory and the one whose parents are of well known intellectual or social 
prominence. 

As far back as 1871 the important change was made in the curriculum 
of the high schools which recognized that the function of these institutions 
was not solely to prepare matriculants for our universities. It is well 
known that the departure then made revolutionized the condition of second- 
ary education in the province. The high schools by becoming adapted to 
the wants of various classes of pupils soon became popular, and increased 
legislative and municipal grants were some of the results. A very valuable 
work of the high schools for many years has been the preparation of can- 
didates for the non-professional requirements for teachers' certificates. The 
new programme still gives prominence to the preparation for matriculation, 
the professions and teachers' certificates. It furnishes, however, other 
courses in view of the many other callings to which young people have their 
attention directed. Provision has been made for commerce, household 
science, manual training, art and agriculture. It is reasonable to expect 
that some of these latter courses will now receive greater attention. Presi- 
dent Hadley, of Yale University, in discussing modern purposes of schools 
and colleges very well remarks, that we now try to educate "students as intel- 
lectual producers and not as intellectual consumers." As late as half a 
century ago, a boy's course in study was not determined by his individual 
aptitudes. It was determined almost entirely by his social standing and, 
perhaps, by his unwise aspirations. "If he belonged to the trading class, 
he received one sort of education; if he belonged to the military class he 
received another sort; if he belonged to the professional class he received 
a third sort:" Doubtless, when free education was adopted as sound in 
poncy in a democratic country, educators were slow to recognize the changes 
which, such recognition must inevitably bring. It is one function of the 
school to give each pupil a chance to have developed his special aptitudes. 
To give all the same training, as was formerly required, or such as is still 
required for professional pursuits, is contrary to modern views of education. 
Hence the provision for different courses of study, and hence the more 
numerous opportunities that are presented for benefiting the public as well 
as advancing the interests of the individual. 

"But the fundamental consideration to be kept in view is the necessity 
so to organize public Secondary Education as that it shall form a constituent 
part of the general provision of National Education as a whole. With this 
in view the Board of Education would have remembered that the base of 
the pyramid is the public provision of Primary Education, and that public 
aid on behalf of Secondary Education should be so offered as to secure that 
the Secondary School in being shall be found to be linked organically to 
the Elementary School, and be in effect more or less of a telescopic develop- 
ment of the educationally humbler institution below it. At the other end 
the scope of the Secondary School should be so directed as to cause it to 
dovetail easily into the institutions for Higher Education above it. In a 
word, whilst class prejudices cannot be put entirely out of sight they ought 
to have been firmly subordinated, as they have been in most of the countries 



xx. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



of Europe, in the States, and in our own Colonies, to the demands of a gen- 
uine democratic and broadly-based scheme of National Education." — The 
Schoolmaster. 

II. CONTINUATION CLASSES. 

The success of continuation classes is now well assured. The exper- 
ience of four or five years proves the wisdom of the provision made for giving 
ample facilities to school boards for extending the work beyond the require- 
ments of the public school programme. The revised regulations give clearer 
recognition to continuation classes, while the responsibilities of the trustees 
are also increased. Continuation classes — at least those of the highest 
grade — may be regarded as simply small, secondary schools. Many of the 
provisions for high schools apply to continuation classes, and they are sub- 
ject to similar examination requirements so far as concern the preparation 
of teachers. In 1903-4 the total number of continuation classes was 419; 
of these 68 were in Grade A, 45 in Grade B, 118 in Grade C, and 188 in 
Grade D. The total number of pupils enrolled was 4,598, and the num- 
ber of teachers employed in continuation class work was 443. The grants 
for each school in these grades were : A, $100; B, $50; C, $25; and D, 
.$16. The sum of $200 was paid to a school in Grade A, if two teachers 
were employed, and $300 if three teachers were engaged. The county 
council is obliged to give an equivalent. In some places county councils 
have, with creditable liberality gone beyond the minimum requirements. 
The trustees are generally anxious to employ teachers of high qualifica- 
tions. In 1903-4, 20 teachers holding degrees in Arts from the universi- 
ties were employed. There were 106 holding first class certificates, and 
239 second class certificates. These institutions, at a comparatively small 
cooo to the province, are doing excellent work. 

III. SCHOOL LIBRARIES. 

By a reference to appendix C, page 60, it will be seen that there has 
been further progress in the establishment of rural school libraries. The 
amount expended by trustees for books was $8,195.70. This shows an in- 
crease over the previous year of $1,306.68. In some counties the move- 
ment for the establishment of school libraries has been very marked. Much 
credit is due to our Public School Inspectors for the manner in 
which they have brought the question to the attention of 
trustees and teachers. The requirements of the new curriculum 
will give a further impetus to the establishment of libraries. 
There is a growing desire to train young children to read the 
best kind of literature. If pupils are left to themselves, or even 
to the guidance of their parents, the best choice of books will not always be 
made. A good library, if attached to an elementary school, becomes a 
powerful means of refining the taste, and enlarging the knowledge of the 
young. Rural schools especially should be furnished with suitable libraries. 
In country districts children very often have little literature in their homes 
and public libraries are not always available. The demand for the best 
works in Nature Study, Biography, History, Poetry, Agriculture, etc., can 
readily.be met by a slight effort on the part of the trustees. When a start is 
made by an expenditure of some $20.00 for books an outlay annually of ten 
dollars will soon secure a valuable library for the section. As trustees are 
recouped for half this expenditure by the Legislature it is safe to say no sec- 
tion, however poor, should be without a library. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxi. 



It is not too much to say that if the children of our public schools do 
not crave for books there is something defective in their intelligence or in 
their training. An atmosphere of good literature is one of the best means 
of cultivating moral and intellectual habits. It would be a mistake to 
assume that the field of knowledge is to be occupied only by those who have 
had the advantages of a college or a high school. In every walk of life 
there may be found persons whose school age closed before the age of 14, but 
who acquired by a ready access to books a good general knowledge of what 
is best in English literature. Under democratic institutions citizens to be 
intelligent should have a fair knowledge of history, and of the institutions of 
the country. Fifty per cent, of all children leave school before the age of 12. 
It would be wrong to close the avenues of usefulness to every boy who is 
obliged to earn his living before completing the public school course. If 
an ardent desire for reading books is cultivated in our public schools the 
difficulties in the way of those who cannot secure a secondary education will 
be partly met. Books make people think, and those who do not think can 
scarcely be regarded as educated. The hope of becoming educated may be 
entertained by every child that will read. It is well known that many 
persons have been started in a useful career by reading a good book. The 
more the value of reading is prized the greater readiness there will be on the 
part of the ratepayers to place every possible advantage within the reach 
of the children attending our public schools. 

It is unfortunate that so many people read few books other than novels. 
One object of a public school library is to remedy this evil so far as possible. 
If children are trained in our schools to have a taste for good literature they 
will not read fiction to excess. The choice of books is important. In the 
catalogue of books provided for use of trustees some careful discrimination 
has been made regarding the books recommended. The amended regula- 
tions give increased latitude for each inspectorate where the Inspector re- 
commends a supplementary list for- the approval of the Education Depart- 
ment. In this way the special demands of each locality may receive due 
recognition. It would never do to give full freedom in the choice of books 
for rural school libraries. The importunity of book agents would in itself 
prove an embarrassment to trustees. It is evident whatever books are pur- 
chased should be of a high order. It is encouraging to find the in- 
creased love for school work among children, which always arises when a 
good library is established. It is safe to say that within a very short time 
the province will take a front place in the number of schools in country dis- 
tricts furnished with libraries. 

IY. TRAVELLING LIBRARIES. 

In 1901, travelling libraries were established in Ontario. The purpose 
intended was to meet the wants of the new and sparsely settled districts in 
the Province. They have generally been taken advantage oi by the men 
working in the lumber and mining camps. In such localities, which are 
generally at a considerable distance from village or well settled country dis- 
trict, public libraries are not accessible. The persons engaged in these oper- 
ations would have difficulty in securing desirable »reading matter. Each 
travelling library contains a set of fifty books. Since their establishment 
37 sets have been sent out. The cases are marked A, B, C, etc. The places 
reached are as follows : 

Michipicoten Harbor, Thessalon, French River, Gertrude Mines, Sud- 
bury, Seguin Falls, Franks Bay, Cache Bay, Cartier, Cordova Mines, Car- 
narvon, Ausonia, Mowat, Gilmore, Edginton, Goulais Bay, Superior Copper 



xxii. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Mines, Searchmont, Boucherville, Markstay, Victoria Mines, Orrville, 
Ballast Pit No. 1, Creighton Mine, Gold Eock, Wabigoon, Blind River, 
Brennan, White Eish, Cutler, Nairn Centre, Masse.y Station, Bancroft, 
Eat Tort age, Huntsville, Parry Sound, Barnesdale, Cobolt. 

V. PUBLIC LIBEAEIES. 

The statistical tables show that the public library system of the province 
has been eminently successful. The total number carried on is 484, and 
of these 146 are reported as free. 52 public libraries did not report for the 
year 1903. The decrease in the number of new libraries is due to the wise 
amendment to the Libraries Act made during the 19,03 session of the Legis- 
lature. The law previously allowed library boards to purchase books on 
credit. The evils arising from this privilege became apparent, and under 
the new provision grants from the Government are based only on cash pay- 
ments for books. 

The province is generous in the aid given to public libraries. The 
grant in each case amounts to 50 per cent, of the sum expended for books 
up to a maximum of $200. It is doubtful if there is any country in the 
world where greater liberality is shown in aiding libraries than in Ontario. 
Our library system affords an excellent opportunity for development, and it 
may be assumed that progress in this field will be marked in the years to 
come. 

Legislative aid to libraries, like aid for other departments of the public 
service, is given to encourage local effort. While the maximum grant is 
$200.00 it may reasonably be expected that library boards which receive 
that amount have contributed more than as much from local sources. In- 
deed, as will be seen from the report, the total receipts in many places are 
three or four times as much as the legislative grant. The expenditures 
upon which the grants are based are not those for salaries, or rent, heating, 
etc., but for the purchase of books. Boards which expend money for books 
raised in this way to the extent of $100.00, $50.00 or $20.00 will receive 
$50.00, $25.00 and $10.00, respectively. 

Compared with other countries the assistance given towards libraries 
in Ontario is exceedingly liberal. In Nova Scotia and New Brunswick no 
aid is given by the Government for the support of public libraries. These 
institutions are in the lower provinces maintained solely from local sources. 
In Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin public libraries receive no grant from the 
legislature. A very trifling grant is given in Iowa. In Minnesota the 
maximum grant to a library is $20.00. Perhaps New York State does as 
much as any other state of the union, but in no case does its grant to a public 
library exceed $100.00. Public libraries in the United States are well 
supported, but this support comes almost entirely from local sources. 

YI. FEEE TEXT BOOKS. 

The year 1904 marks the beginning of the free text book system for the 
rural schools of Ontario. Provision for free text books is the logical out- 
come of free schools. Eree text books reduce the price because the school 
board can take advantage of the wholesale rates, and because the books will 
be better taken care of and used until worn out. An increase of attendance 
will follow. This is the experience of the United States, Massachusetts 
claiming an increase of 10 per cent., while the increased average attendance 
is even "higher. With free text books the .work may proceed promptly at 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxui. 



the opening of the school, whereas under individual ownership there is often 
delay in waiting until each child has secured the necessary books. The 
free text book plan trains pupils to appreciate and care for public property. 
\\ here proper rules are enforced the result seems to secure better care than 
the average child gives to his own property. Minnesota especially reports 
very favorably on this point, and for rural schools the experience in Michi- 
gan is very favorable. A better gradation and classification are possible 
since all pupils in the same class will be furnished the same text at the 
same time, and there will be no delay. Progress in education necessarily 
requires from time to time improved text books. The free text book plan 
makes the change easy when necessary. Free text books induce pupils to 
remain longer at school. When children have to procure their own text 
books they are often withdrawn because the parents cannot meet the neces- 
sary expenses. In England the free tex^ book system has made great pro- 
gress. 

An optional law regarding free tex v - books has been adopted in the fol- 
lowing States : 

Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, 
New York, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, Washington, Wisconsin. 

In the following States the law is compulsory, and has, in many cases, 
followed several years' experience with the optional law : 

Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Ver- 
mont, Idaho, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, Rhode Island. 

As already intimated some states of the American Union, as for instance, 
Massachusetts, make the law compulsory on trustee boards. The law in that 
state, passed in 1883, briefly provides : "The school committee (trustees) of 
every city and town shall purchase at the expense of such city or town (town 
means the same as township) text books, and other school supplies used in 
the public schools, and said text books and supplies shall be loaned to pupils 
of said public schools free of charge, subject to such rules and regulations 
as to care and study, as the school committee may prescribe." 

The late Hon. Frank A. Hill, Secretary of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, says : "The text books of our towns and cities are all selected by local 
boards. There is, of course, a considerable diversity of text books under the 
system. In Massachusetts individualism is so intense that probably any 
suggestion of State uniformity would not be received with favor." 

Among the States where the law is not compulsory, but optional, New 
York may be especially mentioned. In the Empire State, although the 
law is only optional, nearly all the cities and many of the large towns provide 
free text books. 

There is, moreover, another plan adopted, but only by California. The 
law there requires the state board of education to prepare a series of common 
school text books, to have them printed by the state printing office, to be 
bound at the state bindery. All mechanical execution is also under the 
supervision of the state superintendent of printing. The books are dis- 
tributed by the county superintendents to teachers to sell them at cost to 
the pupils for cash and return the receipts to the county superintendents. 

The policy in California has become so unpopular that its example, 
though often enquired into, has never been followed by any other State. The 
initial cost for the plant was exceedingly heavy, and much dead stock was 
accumulated. There has been an agitation for abolishing the system. The 
price of text books was found to be higher than when left to the trade. The 
examnle of California need only be mentioned as a warning to all Govern- 
ment^ to avoid that kind of paternalism. 



xxiv. THE REPORT OF THE "No. 12 



For years the Public Schools Act of Ontario gave school boards full 
power to provide free text books at the expense of the school section or muni- 
cipality. Only a few cities (Toronto, Hamilton and Brantford) exercised 
this optional privilege. The law on the statute book was virtually the same 
as is to be found in such States as New York, Michigan, Minnesota, etc. 

By an amendment to the Education Department Act of 1904 provision 
was made for aiding trustees who adopted the free text book system. The 
regulations, which will be found elsewhere, limit to rural schools the assis- 
tance given. This restriction can be well defended, in view of the large 
(jovernment aid given to high schools, continuation classes, and technical 
education, which benefits urban municipalities. The mode of distributing 
grants for free text books is simple. Forms are sent to trustee boards and 
county inspectors, the letter reporting to the Education Department. As 
might be expected, only a few school sections availed themselves of the pro- 
visions of the new Act in 1904. In most cases trustees, before adopting 
he system, desire to ascertain views of ratepayers at the annual meeting 
ivhich was not held until December. It may be expected that the intro- 
duction of free text books will grow in popularity from year to year. 

It «s worthy of no'te that the policy of Ontario in aiding by grants the 
free text book system is more liberal in these provisions than in the neigh- 
boring states. There, the municipalities pay the entire cost without any 
assistance from the State Legislature. 

Regarding the cost of free text books the following figures from the 
report of the Toronto School Board will be of interest : 

"The cost per pupil for text books on the basis of total enrollment, 
omitting kindergarten pupils, was 9c. 

"The cost per pupil for text books on the basis* of average monthly 
attendance, omitting kindergarten pupils, was 10c. 

"The cost per pupil for supplies on the basis of total enrollment, omitt- 
ing kindergarten pupils, was 9|c. 

"The cost per pupil for supplies on the basis of average monthly at- 
tendance, omitting kindergarten pupils, was 10 Jc. 

"The cost per pupil for both text books and supplies on the basis of aver- 
age monthly attendance, omitting kindergarten pupils, was 20Jc. 

"The cost per pupil for text books, supplies and kindergarten material 
on the basis of total enrollment, was 20 l-5c. 

"In the -above statement the text books and supplies for night schools 
are charged against the day school pupils." 

til. HOME WORK. 

Complaints have frequently been made to inspectors and trustees re- 
garding the excessive amount of home work given to young children. It 
is a great mistake to make the school life of the child unpleasant by giving 
such lessons to prepare at home as will make< school work itself unattractive. 
Before children enter the 5th form it would be safe to say the amount of 
home work should not ordinarily call for more than one hour's preparation, 
and in the case of pupils in the lower classes, much less time. On this sub- 
ject the views of the more experienced teachers are very pronounced. The 
"Elementary School Teacher/' Chicago, voices the sentiments of many per- 
sons who lament the practice not yet abandoned by many teachers of giving 
excessive home lessons to young children : 

"In the development of our educational system the organization of the 
activities of the pupils in the home is rather behind that found in the best 
schools. This is partly because of the feeling that it is the school's func- 



1904: EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxv. 



tion to utilize all the time of the pupil not actually needed for recreation, 
and partly because the modern home, for various reasons, does not always 
seem to be just the place where children are needed. 

"The question of home work for children rests upon debatable ground. 
There are parents who expect the school to make the demand, and they are 
willing so to free the children from other duties that they may meet it. 
The picture of school boys and school girls of other days trudging along 
from school to home with a load of books indicative of tasks that must be 
worked out before next day ; and from home to school with the same burden, 
but with problems that have been solved by the fireside — this picture is too 
vivid in the memory and imagination of most parents for them to realize 
easily that there may be a good school without such outside preparation. 

"It would seem, however, as the present movement toward a unification 
of the interests of the home and school go forward that the school, directly, 
will furnish less rather than more home work for the children. If the 
school properly performs its function of giving the pupil a day filled with 
educative work, it is difficult to see why it ought still to pursue him into 
the period that he should have for recreation, or into the hours when he 
would better be asleep. After a business man has spent a day in his office 
or store; or, after a farmer has driven his plough or harvested his grain or 
cultivated his crops during the day, neither the one nor the other feels that- 
he ought to have "home work" of the same kind. Even the well disciplined 
professional man knows that his "home work" should follow some new chan- 
nels of thought, if he is to recuperate himself properly for the next day, and 
if he is to endure. 

"There seems to be no valid objection to applying v the sfame line of argu- 
ment to the work of the children. In the course of a day, some six hours in 
length, a pupil will have, perhaps, some work in wood, clay-modelling, cook- 
ing, textiles, gymnastics, drawing and painting, with enough of reading, 
writing and arithmdtic along with it all to keep every moment properly and 
fully employed. This is legitimate work, and there is plenty of it as long 
as it lasts. But after school, when the home takes hold, what then? In 
the past, when school was almost wholly a matter of books, the assignment 
of home work was easy. So many pages were set off to be read; so many 
problems in arithmetic to be solved; so many questions in geography to be 
answered — it was all beautifully definite and very easy. 

"But conditions have vastly changed. There is not one home in a 
thousand that has any provision for enabling the pupil to carry forward 
any of the hand work that he is doing at school, even if it be admitted that 
he should do so. In reading we no longer use a single ,book, to be com- 
pleted in a certain time by taking a fixed amount each day. The reading 
is from a library of books, large or small, and it is not easy for the home 
to provide the necessary conditions. In arithmetic the tendency is to solve 
problems when they arise, and the same principle applies to most of the 
subjects which used to be considered legitimate for home work. It is gen- 
erally recognized now, also, that these subjects can be studied with much 
greater advantage and much more .economically in the school, under the 
immediate direction of the teacher, than elsewhere. Most of the academic 
work of the pupils that can be done outside of school, therefore, is coming 
to be of an incidental and general character. 

"It must not be inferred, though, that the school no longer demands 
a preparation for the duties with which it invests the children. It, indeed, 
requires a more delicate and refined preparation for work than ever before. 
This is true because its work is now carefully planned with a deeper appre- 



xxvi. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



ciation of child, character and a truer insight into the essential things which 
develop it. The home influence was once considered sufficient if it sent 
the children to school able to say words and recite formulae. But every- 
body knows nowadays ,that that preparation is of the cheapest kind, in terms 
of human worth, and that it is the easiest possible to provide. The "home 
work' of the children that is most valuable to the modern school is not that 
which can be accomplished mainly by the mouthing of words, or the con- 
ning of pages, but rather by means analogous to those which send the mer- 
chant back refreshed to his store, the lawyer to his client, the minister to 
his pulpit, the farmer to his field — all rejoicing in a new day." 

VIII. CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS. 

In previous reports of this department the advantages of the consolida- 
tion of rural school sections have been repeatedly mentioned. It is scarcely 
necessary to repeat the objects to be secured by having children attend a 
large central school "instead of ungraded schools. A better classification 
of pupils and the employment of teachers of higher qualifications are at 
once assured by consolidation. Doubtless existing conditions, including 
the provision already made for school buildings, will for some time stand 
in the way of progress in this modern movement. It is not necessary, how- 
ever, that consolidation should become general in order that its advantages 
in certain localities may be obtained. There are many villages and small 
towns which might very conveniently have enlarged central schools to ac- 
commodate the children from the urban municipality, and, in addition, 
those from one, two, three or more adjacent school sections. Doubtless 
the expense may' deter trustees in many places. The advantages of con- 
solidation are, however, so apparent that the union of school sections may 
be expected to make progress in future. 

The generosity of Sir William Macdonald by which a consolidated school 
was erected near the Ontario Agricultural College at Guelph will have an 
educating effect upon the many farmers and others who visit that institution 
from time to time. Last year the Education Department provided fourteen 
scholarships for students attending the Macdonald Institute, and an equal 
number are availing themselves of the siame privilege this year. The train- 
ing given at the institution must serve a useful purpose in preparing a 
number of teachers who go forth from the institution acquainted with mod- 
ern systems of school organization, and the best methods of teaching such 
subjects as Manual Training, Household Science and Nature Study. 

IX. SUMMEE SCHOOLS. 

The new programme of studies gives prominence to some subjects not 
heretofore receiving much recognition in the public school curriculum. With 
a view to assist teachers in acquiring a knowledge of the best methods of 
taring up the new subjects, summer schools have been held during the last 
few years In 1902 a school was held in the Toronto Normal School, and 
in 1903 one was held at London, and one near Ottawa. Last year summer 
schools were held at Chatham, Cobourg, and Kingston. The main pur- 
poses in view were to give instruction in manual training, household science, 
are study and drawing. Specialists in the different departments were 
appointed and each of these schools was well attended. Much benefit was 
derived by students and teachers in attendance. It is not, of coiirse pre- 
sumed that such schools should take the place of the ordinary schools for 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxvi, 



the training of teachers. The main object is to meet new conditions, and 
to afford teachers some training in subjects that were not taken up at the 
Normal Schools except of late years. In 1905 it is intended to have summer 
schools at London, Ottawa and Toronto. It is found that by having these 
institutions at the Normal Schools there are better facilities, in view of the 
existing appliances to cover the work required. Schools at these places, 
also, can be readily reached by public school teachers. 

X. TEMPEEANCE AND HYGIENE. 

The importance of instruction in temperance and hygiene is well known. 
The new regulations make some changes respecting the way in which these 
subjects should be taken up. It has long been felt by teachers and other 
educationists that temperance is a virtue which, like truthfulness, honesty, 
industry, etc., cannot be effectively taught by books alone. The regulations 
make provision for proper training in "manners and morals" throughout 
the whole public school course. Instruction in temperance should be given 
incidentally from current incidents, from lessons in literature, history, etc., 
and especially by the example of the teacher. Good habits are strength- 
ened by use. Instruction in hygiene should, to a large extent, be given 
like other departments of nature study or elementary science. Respecting 
the best way of teaching physiology and hygiene, the following views set 
forth by Dr. A. P. Knight will be found very valuable. The remarks of 
Professor Knight, of Queen's University, were submitted in connection with 
a report of work carried on last year at the Kingston County Model School. 
Dr. Knight expresses himself as follows : 

"The special branch of work which I selected was School Physiology and 
Hygiene, in reality a phase of Nature Study. The selection was made be- 
cause of its practical importance. I believe firmly that the knowledge of 
physiology and hygiene which a child can acquire during school life will 
contribute vastly to the preservation of his health and to that pleasure of 
life which is so largely dependent upon good health. 

"A little consideration soon makes it clear to a medical man that the only 
instruction in physiology and hygiene that can be given in the first and 
second classes of our public schools must be limited largely to hygiene. The 
rules of health as stated by the best authorities in medical science must be 
taught, at first, dogmatically to young children. The reason for the rules 
cannot be understood by pupils in Forms I. and II. because the rules pre- 
serving health are based upon a full knowledge of physiology and imply a 
knowledge of physics and chemistry, and along with such a knowledge of 
anatomy as is necessary to understand physiology- 

"To understand how impossible it would be to teach hygiene in any 
other way than dogmatically to young children it is only necessary to glance 
at the curriculum of any decent medical school. A medical school requires 
its students to spend two years on anatomy and physiology, and only after 
this is hygiene and sanitary science taught. Those latter are 'final' sub- 
jects in a medical course. They cannot be fully understood without a pre- 
vious foundation in physics, chemistry, anatomy and physiology, and they 
are, therefore, placed among the third and fourth year subjects of a medical 
curriculum. Obviously, it would be impossible to teach young children the 
laws of health by approaching the subjects as the medical student does. 

"The difficulty in teaching physiology and hygiene to young children 
l a great enough, but when the teacher is required in addition to teach the 
ill affects of stimulants and narcotics upon the various organs of the body, 
be is confronted with the difficulty of teaching another 'final' subject of 
the medical curriculum, namely, pathology. Every rational parent and 



xxviii. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



teacher recognizes the terrible degrading eff ects of the excessive use of alco- 
hol, opium and such like drugs, and the necessity of impressing upon chil- 
dren the horror of becoming slaves to their use, but surely this can be done 
without attempting to teach children the changes which are produced in 
the tissues by these drugs — changes which experts themselves find it dim- 
cult if not impossible, to understand. 

''Manifestly then, in teaching hygiene to young children we must just 
accept the best teaching of medical science as regards the care of the mind 
and body, express this teaching in a set of simple rules, and require young 
pupils to memorize them. In doing this, we can only hope that children 
who do not continue in school beyond the Third Form or reader, may, never- 
theless, be induced, after leaving school, to practice these rules of health, 
just as we hope that we may observe the ordinary rules of conduct and 
morals. 

"With pupils in the Fourth Form, and perhaps the Third Form, the 
case is different. Here some knowledge of anatomy ,and physiology may 
be acquired by observations of parts of animals, ,such as can be obtained in 
any butcher shop. With a little 'trouble on the part o£ the teacher, the 
subject can b© made intensely interesting to even young children, a fiact 
which the model school students had many opportunities of seeing for them- 
selves. 

"The very first day I met the teachers-in-training, I impressed these views 
upon them, and said that my course of instruction to them would be guided 
by these principles. As regards the teachers themselves, I soon found out 
that they knew very little, indeed, about physiology and hygiene. A double 
task, therefore, was before me. These men and women had to be taught 
some physiology and hygiene, and, in addition to this, they had to be instruct- 
ed how to teach these subjects to young children. " 

XL NATURE STUDY. 

The term "Nature Study" has, in recent years, been made to cover the 
study of plants, animals, minerals and the elementary work done in physics 
and chemistry. It also includes much that is ordinarily classed as phy- 
siology and hygiene, as well as geography. The term "Physiography" has 
Jong been used to designate certain phenomena included in geography which 
is, therefore, a very extensive .subject, and one of very great importance in 
the programme of public schools. 

The formation of habits of observation and the arousing of a love for 
nature will determine largely the character and extent of nature study. 
It includes in their proper place and season the observation of minerals, plants 
and animals as well as some of the more apparent physical forces. It 
would be a mistake if the efforts of pupils would stop with a knowledge 
merely of what is observed. The interpretation of natural phenomena is 
of more value than the mere observation of facts. At an early age the 
adaptation of parts of animals and plants to their uses will become an ob- 
ject of enquiry. It should, however, be recollected that while a love for 
nature is the primary end of Nature Study it cannot be reached by simply 
talking about the objects observed. Any drift of such lessons into mere 
sentimental reflections is of little value. 

In connection with this new subject of the pubilc school programme, 
the following remarks taken from a late Massachusetts report are valuable : 

"Through the study of geography the pupils acquire a knowledge of the 
earth as the home of man. There are two elements, therefore, of this 
branch of study ; first, nature, in making the earth suitable for human hab- 



1904: EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxix. 



itation; and, second, the people, in making it a place in which all the acti- 
vities of life are carried on. So far as possible, the pupils' knowledge of 
the earth should be interpreting knowledge, or knowledge by which they 
may understand the relations to human life of its various features, such as 
climate, surface, soil, etc. 

"The facts acquired in nature study ,are closely related to the primary 
facts of geography; indeed, many of the facts of nature study and geography 
arc identical. The subjects of study in these two branches should, there- 
fore, be arranged in the course with reference to purposes of correlation; 
and where it is possible the relations should be made to appear as, for 
example, the effects of running water as a topic of nature study, and the 
study of relief forme as a topic of geography. 

"The relations, also, of one or both of these branches to arithmetic and 
history should be indicated. Probably no subjects in the course will be 
found to be more serviceable for composition and for drawing than these. 
If these relations are not indicated in the course, opportunity at least should 
be afforded for abundant practice in expressing in writing or in drawing 
the facts acquired. 

"In the lower grades resemblances and differences of the human struc- 
ture and that of the lower animals should be objects of study, and in the 
higher grades the connection of the ffacts of anatomy and physiology with 
those of chemistry and physics should be made to appear. In all grades 
the relations t of parts of the body to uses and of uses to health and strength 
should be shown." 

Mr. J. W. Gibson, under the instruction of Professor Robertson, gave a 
series of valuable lessons in nature study to the students attending last year 
the Kingston County Model School. His views given below will be of 
value to all teachers of nature study : 

"My recent experiences in connection with this work have convinced 
me of the fact that the best way to incorporate the nature study ,work as a 
part of our public school- course is to begin with the teachers-in-training 
at the model and normal schools of the province by providing for them 
there a well regulated course in nature study. For some time past I have 
had opportunity to study the question from the teacher's standpoint and to 
observe teachers in their work, which leads me to say that it is difficult to 
find a teacher who is either competent to teach nature study or who is desir- 
ous of attempting it without having first had some special training or help 
in certain lines of nature study work. My recent experiences have con- 
firmed my already strong belief in the nature study and school gardening 
work as # one of the most potent agencies in the training of both teachers and 
pupils ; in making accurate observations and in forming rational conclusions, 
in the formation of good habits and the development of a nobler manhood 
and purer womanhood, and in the acquiring of saner and broader views of 
life, of the relationship of the individual man to his fellow and to his God." 

XII. SCHOOL GARDENS. 

The development of the school garden idea has been rapid in other coun- 
tries, and it may be assumed progress will be made in this direction in On- 
tario when the object aimed at is fairly understood. In a country like 
Canada, which depends so much upon agriculture, every reasonable effort 
should be made to create an interest in the farm. To the credit of Carleton 
the school garden movement has taken a fair hold of the community in that 
county. Regarding its success Inspector Cowley reports as follows: 



xxx. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



"In April, 1904, five school gardens went into operation in connection 
with as many public schools of Carleton County. These gardens are as- 
sociated with Sir William Macdonald's plans for improving* Canadian schools 
and constitute an important factor in the general scheme devised by Pro- 
fessor James W. Robertson to that end. The gardens are placed at inter- 
vals of from seven to fifteen miles, thus bringing the experiment fairly 
under the scrutiny of the entire county. One is at Richmond village, in 
the heart of the county, and is three acres in extent. The others are in 
rural sections, at Mohr's Corners, Carp, North Gower and Bowesville, and 
are each two acres in area. After full discussion with trustees and rate- 
payers the gardens were established under authority of each school board 
concerned. Where additional land had to be bought the Macdonald Fund 
bore half the cost. The fund also undertook to prepare and equip the gar- 
den and to maintain it for three years. For the same period a travelling 
instructor was appointed to visit each garden one day per week for the pur- 
pose of assisting the teachers in directing the garden work of the pupils, 
giving instruction in certain practical aspects of nature study, and gener- 
ally encouraging the association of the garden work with the ordinary exer- 
cises of the class room. There is a garden shed about ten by twenty feet 
for. storing tools and carrying on work not suited to the class room, such as 
analysis of soils, selecting seeds, making labels, potting plants, etc. The 
chief tools and implements are hoes, rakes, handweeders, garden lines, one 
or two spades and shovels, wheelbarrow, saw, axe, grindstone, hammer, 
vise, etc. 

"The general plan of laying out each garden involves (1) a belt of native 
trees and shrubs surrounding the grounds except at intervals where a desir- 
able view is available ; (2) a half-acre playfield for the boys ; (3) a lawn 
bordered with shade trees for the girls ; (4) a shaded walk each for boys and 
girls, about a hundred yards long; (5) an attractive approach to the school, 
consisting ^chiefly of a piece of open lawn with shrubs and flowers on either 
side ; (6) a suitable reservation for individual and class plots ; (7) an orchard 
plot or border ; (8) a forest plot in which the chief native trees are grown 
from seed. 

"As the gardens develop, an influential feature of the work will be the 
distribution of flowers, seeds, trees, etc., to the homes of the section. This 
year hot beds were made in each school garden and were managed largely 
by the pupils. The plants not required for the garden were taken home 
and in many cases the pupil's homework in gardening excelled the results 
he obtained in his plot at ischool. Exhibits of garden produce, chiefly 
vegetables and flowers, were made at the county fair and at two township 
fairs, and won about a hundred dollars in prizes given by the societies and 
by private citizens. 

"The individual plots varied in size from six feet square to six by ten, 
according to the capacity of .the pupil. In one garden the plots were all 
ten by twenty, a big pipil and a small pupil working in partnership. The 
chief things grown were peas, beans, beets, carrots, turnips, ra- 
dish, parsnips, onions, lettuce, asters, zinnias, panmes, balsams,' 
sweet peas, etc. The class plots were each twenty feet square, and 
were used for experimental work with potatoes, corn, clover, cabbage, to- 
matoes, etc. In the largest school two hours per week were requisite for 
garden work. In the other schools one hour sufficed. "Experience indicates 
that when the gardens are fully organized the plots can be well kept by de- 
voting two half -hours per week. The children .have ample time to spare 
and the work of the garden is, undoubtedly, promoting their progress and 
intelligence in the ordinary school course. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxi. 



"In the holidays the weeds gained headway in a few cases, but the pupils 
came to the garden for one hour per week on the average and were given 
credit cards for the work they did. Where the teacher 'conducts the garden 
work successfully during the foresumnier, the pupils can be relied upon to 
look after the plots in vacation. 

"Speaking broadly, the school garden has an educational, an economic, 
and a national aim. Educationally it affords an excellent concrete basis for 
much of the school work in arithmetic, language, writing, reading, -and 
drawing. It develops the motor activities. It turns the powers of ob- 
servation into the orderly channels of cause and effect. It offsets the book- 
lshness of the class room. It awakens an interest in things that grow. It 
encourages work in the fresh air and the sunlight. It unfolds something of 
the beauty and moral spirit of nature. 

"On the economic side it .teachers the constituents of soil, the conditions 
of plant life, the value of fertilizers, seed selection, rotation of crops, tillage, 
etc. It also produces the best trees, plants and seeds for free distribution, 
and stimulates a spirit to improve the farms and beautify country homes. 

"In its national aspect the school garden develops a wide interest in the 
fundamental industry of the country. It convinces the young mind that 
the work of the farmer gives scope for intelligence and scholarship, and 
holds ,out the promise that a life of industry in the country will be followed 
with rewards of prosperity, independence and happiness." 

Other public school inspectors are also recognizing the value of school 
gardens, and are urging teachers and trustees to take advantage of the pro- 
visions of the regulations which will be found elsewhere in this report. In- 
spector Odell, of Northumberland County, has issued a circular to his teach- 
ers from which the following valuable extracts are taken : 

"Those who have not looked carefully into the subject are disposed 
to belittle its importance and taboo the whole thing. So, if you have pre- 
judices, be good enough to set them aside. 

"We drive along the road and too often see untidy home-surroundings; 
too often see that sacred spot, God's acre, neglected; too often fail to see 
borders of flowers and flowering shrubs around neatly kept lawns. 

"Good Schools Associations are being formed in some countries to re- 
vive a lively public sentiment in favor of good schools. The same revival 
is needed in Ontario and the same means might be used with good effect in 
bringing this about as well as placing our educational institutions on the 
highest plane. 

"It seems to me ,that the school ground should be the hub of the sec- 
tion. It should be large, at least one acre, a kind of garden-park, adorned 
Avith choice Candian trees and the best known flowering shrubs and plants 
— a corner being kept for specimens of all wild flowers growing in the neigh- 
borhood — a place where the people of the section may have social gather- 
ings. 

"The study of nature should proceed along natural lines, and we know 
of no better method than the one mapped out. The opportunities in every 
district, rural and urban, for training of this kind, are ample. The cul- 
tivation of a taste for flowers, shrubs and trees is an important part of the 
education of ,girls and boys, who, on leaving school, should be able to iden- 
tify and give the characteristic of all the best known specimens of the flora 
of the country. This cannot be done by book lore. It can only be done 
by the children coming in contact with nature daily; and, further, if we 
can only develop the love of a flower in the heart o»f a child, we have done 
much for that child. Avoid science. What better then to serve the pur- 



xxxii. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



pose just stated than ,to have all the .best varieties of wild and cultivated 
flowers and shrubs in our school yard. And, too, if we desire to trans- 
form many of the most unattractive school-grounds into beautiful spots, 
special and concentrated efforts must be put foitth. 

"Who will be the first to carry out t in a measure, if not fully, the sug- 
gestions as outlined? Who will undertake the study of nature in this most 
natural way? Who will make a little sacrifice of time and convenience 
to begin what has proved to be of such splendid educational value? You 
may say, 'I am leaving the school shortly, and, therefore, it w'Tl be of no 
personal advantage to one.' It must be remembered that the pupils stay 
on at school and the best way to leave the impress of your character on them 
is to leave a memorial in the form of a bed of tulips, daffodils, etc., which 
will, by their beautiful ^tints, the following spring, call you back to remem- 
brance. We all like to be remembered and that for good. We are con- 
stantly sowing for other's reaping and vice versa. We leave a good Senior 
Fourth Class at Christmas. The following sunrxner the pupils do well, 
having shown careful teaching. The work was practically done when we 
left. Another teacher comes in for the reaping of the reward. So it is 
in every department of life." 

XIII. AGRICULTURE. 

In a country like ours everything that has ,a bearing on the interests 
of the farming community is deserving of clofee attention. The tendency 
for persons in rural districts to migrate to urban municipalities is not con- 
fined to Ontario. It would be foolish to attribute this movement to the de- 
velopment of education. Economic causes have, doubtless, most to do with 
the inclination to leave ( the country, and to 'settle in towns and cities. The 
advantages of urban life 'are apparent, and too often its disadvantages are 
overlooked. The social drawbacks of country life have, doubtless, much 
to do with the tendency mentioned. At the same time the growth of mach- 
inery has limited the necessary occupations of the farm. The disappear- 
ance of mechanics from the "cross roads" is due mainly to the rise 6f the 
factory. When work was done by hand more persons were required to do 
the work of the country. There is, besides the noticeable fact that even 
in household occupations many duties have disappeared, which were at one 
time very common. Much of t;he sewing, knitting, eitc, is now done in the 
factory. Conditions have thus arisen which are now well known, and which 
call for consideration. 

It is evident that every possible step /should be taken to make farm 
life not only attractive, but also advantageous from ,an economical point of 
view. Education cannot do everything, but it can do a great deal. For 
many years the importance of properly trained teachers has been recognized 
by the Education Department. Under the regulations long in force in- 
struction has been given in agriculture in all the county model schools, and 
in the normal schools. Every teacher authorized to teach a public school 
has, therefore, some training in the best methods of teaching the subject. 
A text book in agriculture was authorized some years ago for use in the 
4th and 5th forms of the public schools. This work has proved so valuable 
that it became an authorized text book in Wisconsin and in some o ( ther 
parts of the United States. Tor the purpose of further encouraging agri- 
culture and horticulture, and for the purpose of increasing the attractive- 
ness of rural schools, regulations were framed a year ago for the establish- 
ment of school gardens. Every rural school board which provides a school 
garden is entitled to an initial grant of $100, and a subsequent annual 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxiii. 



grant of $10. The establishment of libraries in rural schools has been 
another marked feature of the policy of the Education Department. A 
carefully prepared catalogue giving books recommended has been distrib- 
uted among the trustees of various school sections. The list embraces most 
of the latest works in nature study, agriculture, history, biography, travel, 
poetry and citizenship. Up to a maximum od: $20.00 the Government gives 
one-half the amount expended each year for books. The recent amendment 
to the Education Department Act provides for free text books aided by the 
Legislature. Grants to the extent of 50 per cent, of the amount expended 
for certain text books in rural schools will hereafter be given. In these 
several provisions as enumerated it will be seen that the policy of the Edu- 
cation Department has had specially in view the needs of the farming com- 
munity. • 

The new courses of study to be fiound elsewhere will show the wise pro- 
visions made for a school programme valuable to agriculturalists. It is 
well known that practical farming cannot to any great extent be taught to 
young pupils. A more intelligent interest, however, in the processes of 
agriculture may be communicated and some liking for country life may be 
promoted. The revised courses of study give special prominence to elemen- 
tary science, which lies at the basis of the study of agriculture. Nature 
study which embraces a great deal has received its proper place. Such 
subjects as animal life, the care of domestic animals, -the characteristics 
of plants, and the caring for plants, and economic fruits receive consider- 
able notice. The various operations of seeding, and harvesting, with the 
effects of climate, have a proper place in the curriculum. As the pupil 
advances more attention is given to the functions of plants, the care of ani- 
mals, the culture of farm and garden crops, and various natural phenomena. 
The special courses of study for high schools constitute new, but valuable 
features of the curriculum for secondary education. The courses are two 
in number. 

XIV. INSPECTION. 

It was in 1871 thait provision was 'made in Ontario for county inspec- 
tors. Previously in most places there was an inspector for each township. 
The change to a system of county officers resulted in a revolution in edu- 
cational affairs. For over thirty years the public schools in nearly every 
part of Ontario have made much progress in various directions largely in 
consequence of the improved system of inspection. The amendment made 
during the last session of the Legislature by which the salaries of inspectors 
were increased was a just recognition of claims repeatedly made on behalf 
of a worthy class of educational officials. It will be remembered that the 
cost of living has very much advanced since county inspectors were first 
appointed. The qualifications also have been wisely raised. To receive 
an inspector's certificate now demands that the candidate must have an honor 
degree from a university, have taken one year's course at the ^Normal College 
and must have secured standing as a specialist. He must, besides, have 
had a*t least five years' experience as a teacher, three of which must be gained 
in public school work. It follows, therefore, that no one can be appointed 
an inspector who has not only the highest certificate of academic and pro- 
fessional qualification, but also who is by experience acquainted with ele- 
mentary school work. 

It would be a mistake to suppose that an inspector's duties have to do 
only with the formal inspection of schools. To be a useful officer he must 
h* an educationist in the best sense of the term. He must be an enthusiast 

3 E. 



XXXIV. 



THE REPORT OF THE No. VZ 



in advancing the standing of the teachers in his county, in establishing 
school libraries, and in promoting interest in schools, among trustees and 
other ratepayers. His duties should not be regarded simply as those of a 
detective, but rather as one whose visits to the schools and addresses on 
education have an inspiring influence in every section of the county. 

Much could be said in favor of having our inspectors appointed by the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council and thus freeing them from local influences 
which, sometimes, interfere with their usefulness. It is doubtful, however, 
whether such a step towards centralization would be viewed favorably. The 
amended Act referred to increases the remuneration of inspectors. A great 
deal could be said in advance of having a fixed salary for these officers. 
"So much per school " is objectionable as a mode of payment. The inspec- 
tor should give all his time to his duties, visiting schools not simply twice 
in the year, but three or four times, if the number under his supervision 
and their needs call for isuch visits. It is possible our system of examina- 
tions has too often stood in the way of healthy inspection. Regarding the 
relative values of inspection and examination the following opinions taken 
from an English educational paper are worthy of note : 

"That the inspector has risen to a proper sense of his duty under the 
system is true. In a letter from one of the officers of the National Union 
of Teachers, England, to the Secretary of the Public School Teachers' As- 
sociation of New South Wales, it is stated, corroborative of the above, that 
'the relations beWeen teachers and inspectors have undergone a complete 
revolution. ' Under the examination system, public school teachers in 
England were often the victims of inspector's caprice, and a bad report on 
the day of examination meant something iserious for the unfortunate teach- 
er. 'Now,' says the same writer, 'if an assistant is not working properly 
it becomes the duty of the head teacher to report to the teacher's employers, 
whose duty it is to remove that teacher if he cannot be brought up to the 
mark. We find that if a teacher is so reported upon, and so removed, it 
occurs only after careful investigation and observation, and every oppor- 
tunity is given to the teacher to improve. Under the old system teachers 
not infrequently were adversely reported upon, sometimes dismissed, not 
because their work was unsatisfactory during the year, but because the 
children were nervous on the examination day, or the inspector was out of 
touch with his work on that particular occasion.' 

"The head teacher of ? the suburban school already referred to, since 
gone to his long rest, would have in his day seriously resented any attempt 
to return to examination as indicating an imputation on his honour or a 
belief that he was incompetent to manage his school. The mistress of the 
infarits in the same school Stated that the Government inspectors listened 
to the teaching, and observed the methods of instruction in carrying on the 
ordinary work according to timetable, but conducted no systematic examina- 
tion, and that the board inspectors neither inspected nor examined, but were 
chiefly employed in making enquiry into matters of organization noted by 
uie Government inspectors." 

Extract from an article, "Inspection versus Examination," in Teachers' 
Times, London, April 17, -1903 : 

"The threatened relapse into examination from healthy inspection is 
a subject that disturbs the teacher's peace of mind. What, however, is like- 
ly to be the effect upon the children of our schools? 

"Though examination of attainments is indispensable in promoting 
children from class to class, it can only be done satisfactorily by one who 
knows the children intimately. The mind of a little child is complex, and 
3a E. 



1904: EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxv. 



its growth cannot be estimated by a rough and ready scale. An outsider 
cannot adequately test this growth and progress; only a teacher can do 
i.nat. 

"The value of an outsider lies in the fact that he is, or should be, a 
judge of school method, and because he is in a position to compare the mach- 
inery in different schools. Teachers are isolated in their work, for there 
are really no practical opportunities for seeing other schools at work, con- 
sequently, there is a danger in monotony — that fatal danger — in method. 

"An inspector, if he knows his work, can act as the carrier of good 
methods and the destroyer of inferior methods. He can develop his schools 
in proper directions and eliminate any tendency to go on wrong tracks. 
By judicious suggestions he can often give invaluable help to grateful 
teachers. 

"Inspection, as opposed to examinations, is really a question of point 
of view. To those who think that all school work aims a't making a child 
self-reliant, self-controlled, and eager to learn, inspection of methods and 
its effect on the pupil is best. To those who judge school and teachers' 
work by the intrinsic results of a test paper worked by 'the pupils, examina- 
tion is a fetish. 

"If examinations were conducted in a less rigid manner, the system 
would lose many of its faults. 'There is no such thing as an average child.' 
A child that can work four sums correctly, together with a child who cannot 
work any, are not equal to two pupils with two right each. Every teacher 
knows that, and yet rigid examination treats them as if they were. If any 
examiner tried to find out what children did know, instead of endeavoring 
to discover what was not learned, it would be better. Unfortunately, many 
of the old annual examinations resolved themselves into 'trials of strength 
between the examiners and the ingenuity of the teachers in cramming their 
poor little charges with the latest tricks of answering, and the favorite 
idiosyncracies of the inspector. The pitch of excellence required by in- 
dividual examinations wasted the time which might have been given to 
mental improvement on useless parrot knowledge. 

"The children could not find out things for themselves, time pressed, 
and very often rule of thumb methods were adopted, for, whatever happen- 
ed, three sums out of four must be worked correctly. 

"The very children, backward children, who need careful training in 
growth of mental power, and with whom all lessons should aim more at 
improvement of mind than ability to pass tests, are the pupils whom the 
new regulations propose to examine. The brighter scholars are the only 
pupils who can spare the time to undergo the tests. 

"If a teacher does his work well, there is more real skill and industry 
to be expended under the inspection regime than under examination. Any 
coach can prepare for the latter, but it takes an educator, alert, sympathetic, 
and energetic for the former system. Any teacher who has relaxed his 
efforts under the new conditions has failed grievously towards his pupils, his 
fellow teachers, and himself. 

"In accuracy and neatness of work there is very little difference between 
now and the examination period. But the difference, which was an arti- 
ficial inflation, represents no worrying of the poor dunces, but kindly help- 
ful teaching, no intolerable strain for the teacher, and a magnificent step 
towards true education in the primary school." 

A member of "The Mosely Commission" says: — '.To quote President 
.Eoosevelt, 'America has the advantages in a broader and sounder base of 
general education, but in England there are loftier pinnacles of individual 



xxxvi. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



attainment.' The difference is due to difference of aim, and this again to 
difference of external conditions. Our schools are dominated by outside 
examinations, and organized for the winning of certificates and scholar- 
ships. The public judges their success by the number they win; the masters 
knowing that this is the test on which their professional reputation depends, 
are forced in self-defence to concentrate their attention on the picked 
pupils, and to keep up the pace in class work which will give their powers 
full scope. While the ultimate goal is still far off, a more immediate 
stimulus is supplied in the class prize. The ordinary pupil thus finds the 
work proceed at a rate with which he cannot keep up, while the prize the 
immediate goal of ambition, he knows to be utterly beyond his reach, how- 
ever hard he works. Naturally he soon gives up the struggle, and resigns 
himself to the conviction that headwork is not for such as him. From this 
incubus the American schools are remarkably free. Everywhere there is 
State or university control, but it takes the form of inspection rather Chan 
of examination. There are few scholarships ; indeed, the need of them is little 
felt; the high school course is free, and at the universities a healthy social 
tone combined, in many cases, with an extended summer vacation, makes 
it customary for the poor student to earn enough before the session begins 
to pay his way through it. Where scholarships do exist, they are usually 
awarded without examination. Thus, at Harvard and Tale, the award 
is on enquiry; at Michigan and Chicago scholarships are attached to the 
accredited high schools of the university district either (as within the City of 
Chicago) one to each school, or a number to a group of schools, but in the 
latter case they are awarded in rotation, and there is no inter-school com- 
petition. In a few cases the award is on examination, but in most either 
on enquiry by the university faculty or on recommendation by the high 
school Principal. 

"Add to this freedom from the pressure of external competition an al- 
most complete absence of class prizes and all the machinery of class com- 
petition, and it is not difficult to understand why the pupil of moderate ab'li- 
ties follows the class work with so much more interest in America than he 
does in England. The aim of the American school is the education of all; 
that of the English, the instruction of the few." 

Sir John Gorst, M.P., writes : "I greatly regretted the relapse of 
the London School .Board into the primitive plan of examination as a test 
of schools and school work. The consequence of such a system is that 
children cease to be educated, and instead are only prepared for examina- 
tions. To test either the character. of the school, or the ability and indus- 
try of the teacher by such a method, is, in my judgment, a most unwise 
step, disastrous to real education." 

Mr. Oscar Browning, M. A., Principal of the Day Training College, 
Cambridge, writes : "I am of opinion that the introduction of inspection 
instead of individual examination in the estimate of school efficiency was a 
great improvement, and I should regard any return to the old system as a 
retrograde step." 

Dr. Waller, Westminster Training College, writes : "The effects of the 
system generally were most disastrous involving the worst forms of over- 
pressure. The tone, the activity, and ideal happiness of school life were 
lowered. The attention was concentrated on bringing up every child to the 
minimum standard demanded. School life became irksome, and learning 
was abandoned as soon as the scholar left school. Many of the ablest teach- 
ers abandoned the profession in sorrow and disgust. Their ideals had van- 
ished. They objected to become mere 'Code grinders.' " 

An English Inspector in one of his late reports says : "The old ex- 
amination stimulus has been withdrawn, and the teachers are not yet able 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



to make the best possible use of the liberty that has been given them. It 
is probable that the schools, taken as a whole, are neither as efficient as 
they were two or three years ago nor as they will be two or three years hence. 
But this is not a matter of great importance; what is of importance is the 
growing tendency in elementary, as in every other grade of education, to do 
everything for the pupil, to coddle him, to spoon-feed him, to tie him to 
his nurse's apron and to keep him in leading' strings, to direct his studies 
for him, to arrange his amusements for him, to fill up his leisure for him, 
in short, to do everything for him except what is of all things most truly 
educational, viz., to leave him to his own devices, and throw him upon his 
own resources If we do not do for a pupil what he ought to do for him- 
self, we certainly hold his hands for him while he is doing it." 

XV.— WOMEN TEACHEKS. 

As will be seen from table 3 of Public Schools, page IX, the total 
number of teachers employed in the Public Schools in 1903. was 9,456, of 
whom 7,296 were women. The percentage of men in the profession is 
steadily declining. In 1867 the percentage of men was 58.26. In 1877, 
46.69; in 1897, 30.5, and in 1903, 22.84. The conditions and causes are 
worthy of thought. Several members of the Mosely Commission who visited 
the United States in 1903 called attention, and in most instances disapprov- 
ingly, to the preponderance of women teachers. The situation on the other 
side is pretty well known. As regards the elementary schools, "the passing 
of the schoolmaster' ' has long been noticed. If the tendency were confined 
to the lower classes of the Public Schools, it might not be regarded as a 
disadvantage. In the United States the number of men teachers employed 
in the High Schools has decreased relatively from year to year. Fortu- 
nately for Ontario matters are not so bad. In our High Schools and Col- 
legiate Institutes the proportion of women teachers has not become so great 
as to sause much alarm. It is to be regretted, however, that in many urban 
schools there has been too great a disposition to employ, even for the more 
advanced pupils, women teachers. Frequently one will hear it said that 
the work of the woman is as good in the school as that of the man. Doubt- 
less those who use this line of argument regard the school as simply a means 
not of training but of receiving knowledge. If passing pupils at examin- 
ations were the measure of a teacher's success, it may be difficult to meet 
the argument advanced. Character building is the main object the teacher 
should have in view in instructing his pupils. It is unreasonable to think 
that for large boys a woman is as competent as a man. The trouble arises 
from false views of economy. If proper discipline is to be exercised, that 
force of character which a well trained male teacher should possess, is 
essential. 

In our High Schools and Collegiate Institutes there should be some 
lady teachers in view of the large number of girls attending those institu- 
tions. It is doubtful, however, if there should be in a High School more 
than one woman teacher for every two men. Boys in the higher classes 
of graded public schools should be taught by men. It would be well, also, 
if in a country school having two teachers the principal were a man. Some 
persons deplore the departure of the "schoolmaster" in rural districts. It 
should be recollected, however, that in nearly all country schools the pupils 
are young children where a woman is better fitted to have charge of them. 
No longer do young men as formerly attend country schools. Young men 
living in the country should already be at their life's work, unless prosecut- 
ing their studies which would find them in the high school or college. 



xxxviii. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The entire question is one of importance in view of the formation of char- 
acter. If trustees are willing to give proper salaries, the difficulty" will 
be readily met. 

The following opinion from an English educationist, Hon. E. B. Hal- 
dane, M. P., will be of interest : —"Germany errs on one side of this sub- 
ject, and the United States appear to err on another. A striking feature 
in the report of the Mosely Commission on American education is the testi- 
mony of the witnesses as to the undue extent to which women have become 
the teachers, of young men in the United States. 'In both secondary and 
elementary schools 'teacher' has almost become feminine, and in the newer 
universities large numbers of women are to be found among the teachers. 
While it is undoubtedly a good thing to have women teachers in the ranks 
of the profession, and while, as one parent put it, 'it is better to have one's 
children taught by first-rate women than by fourth or fifth-rate men', it 
cannot be desirable, at least in the higher branches of education, that the 
number of women should preponderate over the number of men. It cannot, 
for instance, contribute to the virility of a nation for- a large number of 
boys to be taught and guided almost entirely up to the age of eighteen by 
women ,^ as is the case in some of the States.' Now the problem which has 
arisen in America is on its way to become a practical one here. The local 
authorities are experiencing increasing difficulty in obtaining competent 
male teachers. This has been notably an experience of the educational 
authority in London. There is probably a general increase in the tendency 
to employ women to teach boys. It has not yet gone far with us, and it 
is probably legitimate and desirable so far as the elementary school is con- 
cerned. But we have to steer between the Charybdis of the United States 
on the pne hand, and the Scylla of Germany on the other — at all events, 
if certain elements in the formation of character are to be developed in our 
general educational system. And the elements in question are not only 
those which are concerned with the courage which is half physical and the 
daring spirit of the ruler of men. The duty and spirit of citizenship is 
more and more becoming recognized as something the sense of which can be 
imparted early. Here again the man seems to be the true teacher of the 
man. I am far from underrating the fine influence which women may 
exercise; but in the school, as in the church, the leader who is most likely 
to influence and mould the youth into accepting him as a leader (and teach- 
ers ought to lead their pupils) is the man." 

Superintendent Wm. H. Maxwell, of Greater New York, thus expresses 
himself : — "Attention has recently been attracted by the report of the 
Mosely Commission to what has been called the feminization of American 
schools, because the great majority of public school teachers are women. 
It was an economic reason, in the first instance — the fact that women work 
for smaller wages than men — that led to the present preponderance of the 
feminine element in the teaching force. It is more than doubtful, how- 
ever, whether American schools and American education have deteriorated 
in consequence. It is quite certain that the refined woman of to-day who 
has been thoroughly trained is a much better teacher than the coarse, ignor- 
ant, pedantic schoolmaster of fifty years a^o, who excited no feeling but 
contempt, hatred or terror in the breasts of his pupils. We all^ believe in 
the salutory influence of the masculine mind in teaching, particularly in 
the case of older pupils, but we also believe that the influence of a strong 
woman is better than that of a weak man; and that sl woman teacher of 
ability who is devoting her life to educational work is apt to be a better 
teacher than the male fledgling who takes up teaching as a makeshift, and 
whose mind is set, not upon education as a career, but upon law or medi- 
cine. In short, to increase the efficiency of the public school 'teaching force 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxix. 



by increasing the number of efficient men teachers — men who would devote 
their lives to the work — would involve a largely increased expenditure of 
money, in order to induce such men to make teaching their life work." 

XVI.— FUNCTIONS OF THE SCHOOL. 

The main function of the school is not to furnish knowledge, or to lead 
pupils to acquire knowledge themselves. Information is valuable only when 
it has developed strength and formed character. To train children that 
they may become good citizens is* the chief duty of the teacher. In secur- 
ing this object the personality of the one who trains is of the first import- 
ance. Fortunately the teachers of our high and public schools are in most 
cases men and women of high character. Professional ability is, however, 
needed and this calls for no small amount of academic attainments, as well 
as systematic training in the best methods of the teacher's art. It is a 
wrong impression to suppose that .a narrow curriculum will serve the pur- 
pose 'of the ordinary child. To know how to take his part in industrial 
or commercial pursuits demands training in a variety of subjects. In a 
democratic community young men should know how the country is govern- 
ed. They should be trained in the best habits and taught to prefer the 
right and to reject the wrong. A well conducted school is a powerful agency 
in preparing boys and girls to take their part in life's battles. The wis- 
dom of school expenditure can be best determined by its results. The pro- 
blem of education is not a simple one. Indeed the science of education 
is in many respects still in a state of evolution. If improvements are to bs 
made, they can come only from careful observation hy educational experts, 
and with liberality on the part of those who contribute to the support of 
school or college. 

Mr. Rathbone, a member of the Mosely Commission, says of the 
schools of the United States : — •' 

"The problem which the American educators seem to me . to be 
attempting to solve is, how to give the children those qualities which will 
make them good citizens and competent workers, men and women who will 
be resourceful, self-reliant, and adaptable, who will be able to observe 
accurately, record their observations correctly, compare, group, and infer 
justly from them, and express cogently the results of these mental observa- 
tions. They desire, no doubt, that in addition to these qualities.and others 
that might be mentioned, the children should have sufficient knowledge 
to enable them to deal effectively with the problems which they 
will have to face in after life, but it is the qualities and not 
the knowledge to which they appear to attach the most import- 
ance,. What the boys and girls are, not what they know, when they leave 
school appears in their consideration to be of the first importance. It is 
useless they say to teach children to read if you do not also teach them 
whv and what to read, and if, when they leave school they have no desire 
to read anything of an improving character. They desire of course that 
the boy shall have the knowledge as well as the qualities, and they hope, 
no doubt, before long to be able to so alter their teaching methods as to 
effect both objects, but in the meantime they think it is better to^ concen- 
trate all their efforts on the formation of character, even if mso doing they 
may give but little knowledge, as when a child leaves school, if he has been 
rightly trained, he will soon acquire most, if not all, of the knowledge need- 
ful to'him. I do not think it can be doubted that no small measure of suc- 
cess has attended the efforts of American educators to attain this end. 

The importance of training is also set forth in the introduction to the 
new school code for the English schools: — 



x). THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



"The purpose of the Public Elementary School is to form and. strength- 
en the character and to develop the intelligence of the children entrusted 
to it, and to make the best use of the school years available, in assisting 
both girls and boys, according to their different needs, to fit themselves, 
practically as well as intellectually; for the work of life. 

"With this purpose in view it will be the aim of the school to train the 
children carefully in habits of observation and clear reasoning, so that they 
may gain an intelligent acquaintance with some of the facts and laws of 
nature; to arouse in them a living interest in the ideals and achievements 
of mankind, and to bring them to some familiarity with the literature and 
history of their own country; to give them some power over language as an 
instrument of thought and expression, and, while making them conscious 
of the limitations of their knowledge, to develop in them such a taste 
for good reading and thoughtful study as will enable them to increase that 
knowledge in after years by their own efforts. 

"The school must at the same time encourage to the utmost the child- 
ren's natural activities of hand and eye by suitable forms of practical work 
and manual instruction; and afford them every opportunity for the healthy 
development of their bodies, not only by training them in appropriate 
physical exercises and encouraging them in organised games, but also by 
instructing them in the working of some of the simpler laws of health. 

"It will be an important though subsidiary object of the school to dis- 
cover individual children who show promise of exceptional capacity, and 
to develop their special gifts (so far as this can be done without sacrificing 
the interests of the majority of the children) so that they may be qualified 
to pass at the proper age into" secondary schools, and be able to derive the 
maximum of benefit from the education there offered them. 

"And, though their opportunities are but brief, the teachers can yet 
do much to lay the foundations of conduct. They can endeavor, by ex- 
ample and influence, aided by the sense of discipline which should pervade 
the school, to implant in the children habits of industry, self-control, and 
courageous perseverance in the face of difficulties ; they can teach them to 
reverence what is noble, to be ready for self-sacrifice, and to strive their 
utmost after purity and truth; they can foster a strong respect for duty, 
and that consideration and respect for others which must be the founda- 
tion of unselfishness and the true basis of all good manners; while the cor 
porate life of the school, especially in the playground, should develop that 
instinct for fair-play and for loyalty to one another which is the germ of 
a wider sense of honour in later life. 

"In. all these endeavours the school should enlist, as far as possible, 
the interest and co-operation of the parents and the home in an united effort 
to enable the children not merely to reach their full development as indi- 
viduals, but also to become upright and useful members of the community 
in which they live, and worthy sons and daughters of the country to which 
they belong." 

The following resolutions passed at the recent meeting in Winnipeg 
by the Dominion Educational Association show the trend of educational 
opinion in Canada: — "(1) In a country like Canada, which recognizes no 
class distinctions, it is the duty of the State to utilize for the general good 
the various useful faculties possessed by each member of the community, 
and with this object in view, all our high schools should be free, and no 
imposition of fees should become a barrier in securing the privileges of 
secondary schools; our universities also should be so generously supported 
as not to close their doors to students who are not children of wealthy 
parents.'" 



]3<M EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xli 



"(2) The formation of character should be the chief aim to be kept in 
view in all efforts to advance the work of the school. Knowledge and edu- 
cation are not identical. Moral training should form the most important 
part of the teacher's duties. Instruction in morality should be mainly 
incidental rather than formal, and the use of a text book for the purpose 
is secondary in value. The best teacher is the one who is the best disci- 
plinarian, and the personality of the teacher should be the highest desider- 
atum. If better moral training is to be given in our schools, the object can 
be secured only by demanding teachers of high qualifications." 

"(3) This Association desires to impress upon the attention of Canadians 
the importance of education as a question which lies at the basis of demo- 
cratic institutions, and would urge greater liberality of expenditure on the 
part of provincial and municipal authorities in support of Elementary, 
Secondary and Higher Education. While our country is advancing in 
material prosperity, it is essential to the growth and stability of our insti- 
tutions that all classes of citizens should more fully realize the value of the 
intellectual and moral development of our population.'' 

''(4) Patriotism should continue to form a prominent feature of the 
instruction given in all our schools, and pupils should be trained to have 
an intelligent appreciation of those advantages which Canadians as^ citizens 
of our great empire enjoy. In fostering a love for British institutions, 
military achievements should not be set forth as the chief factors which 
have contributed to the grandeur and glory of the nation. Children should 
be trained in all those habits which promote good citizenship, and taught 
to realize that the highest examples of courage, self-control and usefulness 
are not associated with war." 

XVII.— EXPERT KNOWLEDGE IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. 

President Charles W. Eliot of Harvard University, in. an address, 
"The Function of Education in Democratic Society," delivered before the 
Brooklyn Institute, October 2, 1897, said, among other things : 

"Confidence in experts, and willingness to employ them and abide by their 
decisions, are among the best signs of intelligence in an educated individual 
or an educated community; and in any democracy which ^ is to thrive, this 
respect and confidence must be felt strongly by the majority of the popula- 
tion. In the conduct of private and corporation business in the United 
States the employment of experts is well recognized as the_ only rational 
and successful method. No one would think of building a bridge or a dam, 
or setting up a power station or a cotton mill, without relying absolutely 
upon the advice of intelligent experts. The democracy must learn, in gov- 
ernmental affairs, whether municipal, State, or national, to employ experts 
and abide by their decisions. Such complicated subjects as taxation, fin- 
ance, and public works cannot be wisely managed by popular assemblies or 
their committees, or by executive officers who have no special acquaintance 
with these most difficult subjects. American experience during the last 
twenty years demonstrates that popular assemblies have become absolutely 
incapable of dealing wisely with any of these great subjects. A legislature 
or a congress can indicate by legislation the object it wishes to attain ; but 
to devise the means of attaining that object in taxation, currency, finance, 
or public works, and to expend the money appropriated by the constituted 
authorities for the object, must be functions of experts. Legislators and 
executives are changed so frequently, under the American system of local 
representation, that few gain anything that deserves to be called experi- 
ence in legislation or administration; while the few who serve long terms 



xlii - THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



are apt to be so absorbed in the routine work of carrying on the Govern- 
ment, and managing the party interests, that they have no time either for 
thorough research of for invention. Under present conditions, neither ex- 
pert knowledge nor intellectual leadership can reasonably be expected of 
them. Democracies will not be safe until the population has learned that 
governmental^ affairs must be conducted on the same principles on which 
successful private and corporate business is conducted; and therefore it 
should be one of the principal objects of democratic education so to train 
the minds .of the children, that when they become adult they shall have 
within their own experience the grounds of respect for the attainments of 
experts in every branch of governmental, industrial, and social activity, 
and of confidence in their advice." 

Dr. Draper, the newly appointed Commissioner of the State of New 
York, says : —"If the department is to be an uplifting and aggressive force 
in the educational activities of the State, its time and productive energies 
cannot be occupied almost exclusively with routine, or with questions and 
difficulties arising out of routine. If the teachers of New York are to 
advance in professional enthusiasm and in teaching power, they must be 
trusted more, encouraged to exercise larger independence, and left to more 
of their own resources concerning the relations of teaching and examining. 
If the examinations are to be just to the children of the State, they must 
consume less time, they must bind thought less and leave nature's inclin- 
ations more latitude, and the papers must be more deliberately rated by 
me a and women of wider experience and outlook. If the edu- 

cational system is to be of real advantage to the people, it must be within 
the comprehension of men and women who are ordinarily intelligent and 
would like to understand it." 

A couple of years ago an important commission was appointed by the 
Government of New South Wales to examine into the educational features 
of the leading countries of Europe and America. The commissioners visited 
Great Britain, France, Germany, Sweden, Italy, the United States, Canada, 
and some other countries. The report issued is a very comprehensive one, 
and the views entertained regarding the question of the best method of 
administering educational affairs are very suggestive. Regarding the direc- 
tion of education by the Government the following opinions are expressed :■ — 
"Under any scheme of Government the political policy and general aim 
of a Department of Public Instruction must necessarily devolve upon ^ a 
Minister acting under the authority of Parliament. Education is, 
however, so special a subject that no Minister would claim to be an expert 
therein, and therefore a comprehensive educational scheme for any State 
needs to be shaped as regards its general technique and details by a well 
directed and far sighted policy of development. This must proceed from 
some individual having a commanding knowledge of modern education, 
and of modern educational method. In the nature of things a Minister 
cannot devote sufficient time to become an educational expert of the highest 
order himself, nor is that his appropriate function, either here or else- 
where, so that although the Minister must ever control the great questions 
of departmental policy which represent the decisions of the State as regards 
the whole issue, the realization of the educational system requires that the 
chief administrator shall be really director of education. The direction 
must necessarily aim at the perpetual embodiment of such advances and 
improvement of method as the total experience of mankind shews to be 
necessary and must be that of an expert who thoroughly understands the 
educational systems of the world, and the special needs of our own terri- 
tory. An educational system cannot be a patchwork production, it must 






1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xliii. 



have organic unity if we are ever to have education equal to that of the 
greater countries of Europe/ ' 

The value of expert knowledge in school matters so long advocated in 
the United States is set forth in the following resolution passed at the Na- 
tional Educational Association of the United States last summer: — "We 
would direct attention, therefore, to the necessity for a supervisor of ability 
and tact for every town, city, county, and state system of public schools. 
Not only are leaders needed m this position who can appreciate and stimu- 
late the best professional work, but qualities of popular leadership are also 
demanded to the end that all classes of people may be so aroused that every 
future citizen of the Republic may have the very best opportunities for 
training in social and civic efficiency.' ' 

In the last report of the Superintendent of Education for the Province 
of Nova Scotia, the following language indicates the same need in all de- 
partments of education for trustees, municipal councils and other public 
bodies guiding their actions by* the opinions of experts : — "Every school 
section, according to law, must have one expert head, a duly licensed teach- 
er who may be known as the principal, or when there are so many schools 
that his time is taken up mainly with supervision instead of teaching, as 
the supervisor. It was found to be necessary for the purpose of properly 
co-ordinating the work in the several departments^ and especially for the 
purpose of unifying the statistics of the school section in the "returns" to 
the Education Department. 

"This principal or supervisor is also made the official adviser of the 
school board, and is expected to be present at all ordinary meeting^ of the 
board as the representative of the teachers for the purpose of giving in- 
formation to the board, and so that he may fully understand its policy and 
and thus be better able to direct the teachers under his supervision. The 
members of the school board should be careful on the other hand to ^obtain 
the views of the principal on all school matters; for no matter how intelli- 
gent they may be in their own business affairs, they cannot be expected to 
understand fully many things to which the teacher only can be alive. 
After having all the information and advice which the principal can give, 
the members of the school board then have the right to decide according 
to their own judgment what shall be done. The principal has no vote, 
merely an opportunity for giving information and discussing the bearings 
of any proposed action. When a school board does notfeel like inviting 
the principal to be present with them for the mutual consideration of affairs 
coming within the purview of Regulation 23, the logical course is to get 
another principal. Otherwise an appeal against their decisions may be 
effectively made." 

It is well known in Ontario that the best managed collegiate institutes 
and high schools are those where the school boards secure the appointment 
of principals of good administrative ability, and act upon their advice ; n 
all matters pertaining to the selection of assistant teachers, and any other 
question of general administration for which expert knowledge is essential. 
In rural districts as well as in urban municipalities the judgment of the 
public school inspector is closely followed by trustee boards, and other local 
authorities that have to do with education. It would be difficult to over- 
estimate the value to our high and public schools of ^ the knowledge, dis- 
cretion and enthusiasm displayed by inspectors and principals. 

XVIIL— TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES. 

To supply our schools with teachers well qualified is always pne of our 
most perplexing problems. Circumstances have made the question a seri- 
pus one for Ontario. There is at present a greater dearth of teachers of 



xliv. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



high qualifications than there has been for many years. The scarcity of 
teachers has invaded the secondary schools. The Education Department 
has been obliged under the provisions of Eegulation 37 (2) to issue a number 
of temporary certificates to assistant high school teachers. The number of 
temporary certificates granted to public school teachers within the last 
year is unusually great. The conditions call for an intelligent examination 
of the whole situation. It is clear the teaching profession does not furnish 
inducements sufficiently tempting to warrant young persons in incurring 
the expense necessary to become qualified. The salaries paid, though slight- 
ly in advance of some previous years are exceedingly low when compared 
with what is paid to persons in other callings of life. The expense of living 
has increased without a corresponding increase in the remuneration paid. 
The salaries paid young women in our public schools have not at all ad- 
vanced in proportion to the increased wages paid to persons in other occu- 
pations. The difficulty of obtaining the higher grades of certificates, and 
the poor remuneration paid have caused very few of our teachers to aim 
for first class certificates. The summary I (3) given on page IX is far from 
encouraging. In response to a circular sent out to inspectors this year 
(1905) the facts are discouraging, but the needs of our schools warrant that 
the true condition should be known. It appears that this year the number 
holding first class certificates in our public and separate schools is only 
613. The number holding second class certificates 3,976. There are 2,682 
holding third class certificates ; 624 holding extensions or renewals of third 
class certificates; 56 are teaching on Old Cpuntry Board certificates. There 
remain 535 who hold only District certificates, and 336 holding only tem- 
porary certificates. 422 appear not to hold any legal certificates of quali- 
fications. These, however, are mostly teaching in Separate Schools, and 
will doubtless soon qualify in view of the recent decisions of the court. The 
certificates of 170 are not reported. From these figures it is clear a great 
many children in our public and separate schools are not taught by teachers 
with good qualifications. What then should be done? This is the problem 
to consider. Is the province right in adhering to the present method^ of 
distributing the legislative grant ? Schools employing teachers holding 
only district certificates receive at present the same share of the grant as 
those employing first class teachers. Should a school which employs a 
teacher holding only a district certificate receive any share ^ of Jhe legisla- 
tive grant ? Has not the time come when a mode of distributing ^ the 
£240,000 annually paid should be placed upon a different Basis ? This is 
a question for the legislature to deal with. 

XIX.— UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT. 

The report from the authorities of the University of Toronto show the 
continual progress of that institution. The facts mentioned in the report 
which is given in Part 2 will pay a careful examination. The growth of 
our highest seat of learning is most encouraging. The province must, 
however, realize that much larger expenditures are necessary if modern 
conditions are to receive due recognition. The constitution of the Univer- 
sity, including its organization and management, is one which will call 
for consideration at an early date. 

The report of the School of Practical Science shows how another de- 
partment of higher education has grown to very large, proportions. The 
new Science building, including the necessary equipment and additions to 
the staff, cannot be maintained without increasing the demands upon the 
legislature. 



1 

1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xlv. 



XX.— CONCLUSION. 

The remarks given in these pages refer to some of the questions which 
engaged the attention of the Education Department during the last year. 
Much the greater part of the statistics and discussions of educational ques- 
tions were prepared before the undersigned took charge of the Department. 
For various matters connected with the work of our schools the reader must 
refer to the statistical tables. The future presents a variety of topics de- 
manding the attention of leading educationists of the province. All our 
schools of to-day show the development of half a century. Canada scarcely 
yet realizes its magnificent resources, and does not fully appreciate the 
possibilities before us if the advantages of school and college are brought 
home to our young people. Fair discussion is always in order. To conceal 
defects is the reverse of wisdom. I have had charge of the Department 
only for such a short time that it would be unexpected or unbecoming on 
my part to indicate the various directions in which improvement is neces- 
sary.^ Perhaps it will be as well for me to mention at present only one 
question, the importance of which has been clearly brought before me. 
This question — a far reaching one — is that of elevating the status of the 
teacher, and thus making educational effort more effective in every school, 
college and university of the land. The advice and assistance of teachers, 
inspectors, university professors and other educationists, I have reason to 
believe will not be lacking. With their assistance I may reasonably hope 
^hat fair progress will continue. 

R. A. PYNE, 
Minister of Education. 
Education Department, 

Toronto, April, 1905. 



APPENDICES. 



[i 



1904 THE REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX ^..-STATISTICAL TABLES. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

I. — Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. 



Counties, 

(including incorporated villages but 
not cities or towns) etc. 


CO . 

*3 <S be 
eS e< 

o ■- , en 

P-0> cS 

■— i > a> 
-§.Qcn 


(-i ■ 

* "3 

SQ 
CO M- 

Q.CU 

Pi 


Pupils between 5 
and 21 years of 
age. 


CO 

&, & 

Pi 


CD a 

IS 

J3 03 . 

s=i2 
'3.° 

^ x 
H 


BO 
O 


00 

3 


if 

OS . 

o> .-> 3 

> a p. 

4 


Is 
*S . 

*§►§ 

a> «J =5 
Pi 


1 Brant 


3,778 

13,153 

8,468 

4,985 

5,308 

5,099 

6,735 

10,291 

7,048 

4,300 

15,342 

4,856 

5,764 

4,416 

12,147 

13,895 

9,541 

11,119 

5,741 

10,451 

5,112 

3,994 

11,417 

*7,027 

7,044 

7,851 

8,700 

4,965 

8,540 

6,508 

11,993 

*3,245 

10,776 

17,522 

4,982 

8,284 

7,471 

6,303 

11,153 

5,405 

13,696 

2,181 

7,276 

•8,087 
30 

351,999 


7 
18 
54 
23 
25 
10 
12 
17 
.47 
26 
82 
10 

26 

19 

8 

n 

8 

2 l 

28 
20 
23 
2 l 
33 
38 
7 
13 
31 
12 
15 

34 
32 

905 


3,056 
10,445 
6,637 
4,443 
4,226 
4,431 
5,796 
6,425 
5,539 
3,754 
12,760 
b ,633 

4,937 
3,278 
8,741 
10 017 
7,909 
9 130 


1 

5 
4 
5 

' 'i 
' "2 

2 

1 

10 

2 

4 
4 

\ 


3,064 
10 468 
6,695 
4 471 
4 251 

4 442 
5,808 
6,444 

5 588 
3 781 

12 852 
3.643 

4,963 
3,280 
8,789 

10,031 

. 7,929 
9,139 
4,287 
8,773 
4,166 
3,650 
8,781 
5,432 
5,663 
6,747 
6,731 
3,764 
6,207 
5,126 
5,173 
2,650 
7,440 

14,986 
3,976 
6,811 
5,488 
5,171 
7,920 
4,709 

11,300 

1,775 

6,072 

5,421 
19 


1,620 
5,398 
3,525 
2,299 
2,185 
2,248 
3,013 
3,300 
2,902 
1,933 
6,638 
1,909 

2,536 
1,696 
4,507 
5,238 
4 129 
4,819 
2,170 
4,485 
2,168 
1,927 
4,541 
2,760 
2,933 
3,560 
3,570 
2,0 24 
3,277 
2,645 
2,5 8 7 
1,3 5 9 
3,8o9 
7,868 
2,0 9 
3,536 
2,967 
2,66l 
4,175 
2,480 
6,010 

893 

3,066 

2,709 
9 


1,444 

5 ,070 
3,170 
2,172 
2,066 
2,194 
2,795 
3,144 
2,686 
- 1,848 
6,214 
1,734 

2,427 
1,584 
4,282 
4,793 
3,800 
4,320 
2,117 
4,288 
1,998 
1,723 
4,240 
2,672 
2,730 
3,187 
3,161 
1,740 
2,930 
2,481 
2,586 
1,291 
3,631 
7,118 
1,886 
3,275 
2,521 
2,510 
3,745 
2,229 
5,290 

882 

3,006 

2,712 
10 


1,653 

5,825 
3,433 
2,025 
2,383 
2,415 
2,733 
3,174 
2,421 
1.781 
6,400 
2,265 

2,179 
1,755 

4-408 
5,787 
4,089 
5,221 
2,483 
4,691 
2,200 
1,952 
5,121 
2,870 
3,091 
3,573 
3,706 
1,866 
3,815 
2,448 
2,522 
1,408 
3,337 
7,732 
2,033 
3,268 
3,414 
2,654 
4,420 
2,507 
5,873 

736 

2,889 

2,352 

9 


54 
56 




51 


4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 


45 
56 
54 


7 Elgin 


47 


8 Essex 


49 




43 


10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 


44 
49 


12 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton, N.E. Muskoka, S. 

Nipissing & E. Parry Sound 

14 Balton 


62 

44 
5 3 


15 Hastings 

16 Huron 

17 Kent 


50 
57 
51 
57 




4*270| . . . 

8,732; 2 
4,163l 2 
3,635 . . . 
8,771 1 
5,406^ 2 
5,6571. . . 
6,737 2 
6,729 2 
3,764... 
6,188; 1 
5,1051 . . . 
5,14L 4 
2,628 2 
7,415 2 

14,952 11 
3,942 1 
6,768 5 
5,479 2 
5,157 1 
7,888 1 
4,697,. . . 

11,284 1 
1 
1,775 . . . 

6,032 6 

5,385 4 
19 ... 


58 


20 Leeds and Grenville 

21 Lennox and Addington 


53 
52 
53 


23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 


58 
53 


25 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 


55 
53 
55 
50 
61 


30 Peterborough 

31 Prescott and Russell 


48 
49 
53 




45 


34 Simcoe and W.. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 


52 
51 
48 


38 Welland , 

39 "Wellington 


62 
51 


3b Victoria and S. E. Muskoka 


56 
53 


41 York 

42 Rainy River and Thunder 

Bay Districts 

43 Algoma and 

Manitoulin -. 

44 N. Nipissing, etc., and W. 

Parry Sound 

45 Moose Fort 


52 
41 

47 

43 
47 


Totals 


272,876 95 


273,876 


142,174 


131,702 


142,917 


52 


1 Belleville ••• 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham ... 


2,142 
3,693 
2,586 
3,320 

14,334 
5,674 
9,561 

16,747 
2,960 
3,921 
2,689 

53,487 
3,974 
2,095 




1,299 .. . 
2,562 .. . 
1,543 .. . 
1,702 . . . 
8,114 ... 
2,374 ... 
5,675 ... 
4,898 . .. 
1,459 . .. 
1,934 ... 
1,494 . . . 
29,744 2 
1,721 . . . 
1,592 . . . 


1,299 
2,562 
1,543 
1,702 
8,114 
2,374 
5,675 
4,898 
1,459 
1,934 
1,494 
29,746 
1,721 
1 1,592 


667 

1,290 

771 

855 

4,142 

1,175 

2,837 

2,509 

689 

947 

789 

14,843 

865 

795 


632 

1,272 

772 

847 

3,972 

1,199 

2,838 

2,389 

770 

987 

705 

14,903 

856 

797 


834 
1,877 

987 
1,229 
5,953 
1,912 
4,040 
3,406 
1,020 
1,361 
1,044 
20,914 
1,262 
1,141 


64 
73 
64 

72 


5 Hamilton ... 


73 
80 




71 


8 Ottawa ... 


70 
70 


10 St. Thomas 

11 Stratford 

12 Toronto 

13 Windsor 

14 Woodstock 


70 
7 
70 
73 
72 


Totals 


127,183 






33,174 


32,939 


. 46,980 


71 






\ 







♦Estimated. 
4 E. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Ho. 12 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.— Continued. 



I. — Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. — Continued. 



Towns. 



lis 

CO 



'So? 



£S 



n tic 
a> as 

o o 






2 oJ • 



: s © 

, P.CO 



«3 . 

<p-0 to 



CJ ft 



al 

•H o 



bCa)§ 

s 2 1 3 

fe * oJ 



1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amher8tburg 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Barrie 

9 Berlin 

10 Blenheim 

11 Bothwell 

12 Bowmanville 

13 Bracebridge 

14 Brampton 

15 Brockville 

16 Bruce Mines 

17 Cache Bay 

18 Carleton Place 

19 Clinton 

20 Cobourg 

21 Collingwood .. ... 

22 Copper Cliff 

23 Cornwall 

24 Deseronto 

25 Dresden ....... 

26 Dundas 

27 Dunnville ...... ..'.. 

28 Durham . 

29 East Toronto . 

30 Essex 

31 Forest 

32 Fort Frances ... 

33 Fort William .. 

34 Gait ' 

35 Gananoque 

36 Goderich .... 

37 Gore Bay '.'." 

38 Gravenhurst '.. ... 

39 Harriston "'.... 

40 Hawkesbury ...... 

41 Hespeler *' 

42 Huntsville . 

43 Ingersoll 

44 Kincardine 

45 Kingsville 

46 Leamington 

47 Lindsay ' 

48 Listowel 

49 Little Current '.'.'. 

50 Mattawa .. 

51 Meaford 

52 Midland ., 

53 Milton 

54 Mitchell 

55 Mount Forest ....*.. 

56 Napanee 

57 New Liskeard .... 

58 Newmarket 

59 Niagara 

60 Niagara Falls 

61 North Bay 

62 North Toronto ... 

63 Oakville 

64 Orangeville 

65 Orillia 

66 Oshawa 

67 Owen Sound 

68 Palmerston 

69 Par's 

70 Parkhill ......" ...... 

71 Parry Sound 

72 Pembroke ...... ... 

t73 Penetanguishene 

4a E. 



531 
460 
871 
606 
907 
476! 
555i 

2,1471 

2,980 
564 
237, 
621 

1,050 
900 : 

2,469; 
217 
275 

1,300 
584 
916 

1,895 
413 

1,869 
960 
450 
928 
560 
460 
*914 
366 
364 
250 
930 

1,687 

1,217 

1,020 
363 
630 
58 

1,229 
671 
677 

1,408 
572 
487 
693 

1,841 

620 

340 

*461 

509 

1,200 
470 
702 
523 
620 
•364 
602 
167 
172 
902 
539 
460 
980 

1,638 

1,201 

2,429 

•501 

916 

306 

1,193| 

1,440; 
801 



•1 



400 
394 
291 

57 1 
374 

41? 

1.091 

1,504 

394 

209 

47 

807 

5lo 

1.244 

23| 

196 

902 

431 

544 

Hll 

652 
655 
427 
563 
478 
446 
703 
357 
304 
193 
716 

1»32„ 
758 
598 
276 
603 
332 
139 
503 
601 
785 
458 
403 
496 

1.117 
*539 
331 
77 
409 
971 
383 
3 
425 
549 
280 
434 
240 
745 
564 
525 
343 
542 
967 
777 

1,740 
385 
495 
221 
916 
652 
631 



402 
394 
29l 

57 1 
374 

419 

1 504 
'394 
210 
470 
807 
515 

1,244 

'238 

196 

902 

544 

1.471 
'352 

652 
655 
427 
563 
478 
450 
703 
35? 
304 
193 
716 
1,325 
758 
598 
278 
606 
334 
139 
503 
601 
785 
458 
403 
496 

539 
331 

77 
409 
971 
383 
369 
425 
549 
280 
434 
240 
745 
564 
525 
346 
542 
967 
777 
1.740 
385 
495 
221 
918 
652 
631 



45 

202 
194 
153 
274 
175 
198 
549 
774 
214 
123 
246 
397 
269 
611 
140 

90 
456 
231 
279 
725 
168 
345 
335 
197 
272 
230 
188 
364 
174 
129 

96 
368 
642 
402 
283 
135 
312 
180 

83 
256 
317 
390 
217 
203 
254 
555 
277 
161 

40 
193 
471 
193 
179 
236 
252 
146 
222 
125 
398 
277 
261 
177 
245 
479 
371 
825 
206 
275 
109 
438 
327 
333 



39 

200 
200 
138 
303 
199 
221 
542 
730 
180 

87 
224 
410 
246 
633 
128 
106 
446 
200 
265 
746 
184 
307 
320 
230 
291 
248 
262 
339 
185 
175 

97 
348 
683 
356 
315 
143 
294 
154 

56 
247 
284 
395 
241 
200 
242 
562 
262 
170 

37 
216 
500 
190 
190 
189 
297 
134 
212 
115 
347 
287 
264 
169 
297 
488 
406 
915 
179 
220 
112 
480i 
325; 
298| 



45 
221 
274 
185 
405 
248 
282 
605 
1,133 
268 
130 
329 
397 
383 
896 
144 

95 
623 
303 
374 
971 
212 
478 
458 
278 
293 
263 
273 
435 
207 
208 

94 
401 
857 
491 
401 
152 
376 
196 

87 
330 
395 
491 
242 
250 
293 
800 
361 
149 

41 
277 
543 
271 
261 
280 
335 
123 
287 
127 
478 
324 
328 
218 
365 
663 
526 
1,202 
239 
349 
141 
501 
419 
391 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.- Continued. 
I. — Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. — Concluded. 



Towns. 



12 

O 5 s £ 






3 °* 

Pi 





o? 




es 


JH-C 




»-. c5 


ii 




a> tuo 




o*, 


3 * • 




o 


B.3 o 




EL<3 


3|l 

o a,a3 


O 


H 


H 



JJ'O m 

£££ 

a> +-> 3 
> si & 



° 

||| 

||| 

Cj rt oj 



74 Perth 


959 
2,831 




, 529 
1*557 




529 
1,557 


267 
764 


262 

793 


388 
1,033 


73 
66 


75 Peterborough 


76 Petrolea 


950 


875 




875 


450 


425 


566 


65 


77 Picton 


803 


586 




586 


316 


270 


357 


61 


78 Port Arthur 

79 Port Hope 


918 

1,000 


698 

838 


698 
838 


338 
416 


360 
422 


415 
460 


59 

55 




80 Prescott 


675 


428) 


428 


194 


234 


285 


66 


81 Preston 


603 


390! 


390 


191 


199 


287 


73 


82 Rat Portage 


1,604 




826 


826 


408 


418 


567 


68 


83 Renfrew 


1,082 




423 


423 


218 


205 


303 


71 


84 Ridgetown 


557 




460 




460 


231 


229 


278 


60 


85 St. Marys 

86 Sandwich 


915 




571 




571 


299 


272 


404 


71 


501 




- 147 




147 


74 


73 


76 


52 


87 Sarnia 


2,567 


1*469 




1,469 


693 


776 


1,042 


71 


88 Sault Ste. Marie 






1,325 
326 


648 

167 


677 
159 


806 
239 


61 
73 


89 Seaforth 


615! 326 


90 Simcoe 


620 459 

*l,410l 1,089 




459 
1,089 


229 
500 


230 
589 


284 
788 


62 


92 Stayner 




71 


91 Smith's Falls 


350 ! 266i 


266 


131 


135 


202 


76 


93 Strathroy 


750 498 


498 


239 


259 


358 


72 


94 Sturgeon Falls 


684 


225 


225 


101 


124 


128 


57 


95 Sudbury 


♦6111 


230 


230 


122 


108 


126 


59 


96 Thessalon 


421 


325 


325 


168 


157 


168 


52 


97 Thornbury 


227 


160; 


160 


89 


71 


108 


67 


98 Thorold 


554! 


3181 


318 


155 


163 


179 


56 


99 Tillsonburg 


483 4741 


474 


238 


236 


331 


70 


100 Toronto Junction 


2,148 


1,384 


1,384 


692 


692 


839 


60 


101 Trenton 


1,164 


598 


598 


298 


300 


415 


69 


10? "Oxbridge 


485 


345! 


345 


173 


172 


206 


60 


103 Vankleekhill 


*643i 


210! 


210 


110 


100 


128 


61 


104 Walkerton 


690 


450[ 


450 


213 


237 


300 


67 


105 Walkerville 


556| 


331 


331 


162 


169 


214 


65 


106 Wallaceburg 


1,0181 i 583 


583 


284 


299 


401 


69 


107 Waterloo 


1,090 1 590 


590 


316 


274 


462 


78 


108 Welland 


430! 252 

691 379 




252 
379 


127 
195 


125 
184 


185 
246 


73 


109 Whitby 




65 


VQ Wiarton 


*843| 649 


« 649 


340 


309 


410 


63 


Ill Wingham 


700] 583 583 


264 


319 


378 


65 


Totals 


98,201 12 63,151 9 63,172 


31,446 


31,726 


40,833 


65 


Totals. 












Jl Counties, etc 


351,999 905272,876 95 273.876 142,174 


131,702 


142,917 


52 


2 Cities 


127 183 1 fifi.111 


2 66 113 


33 174 


32 939 


46 980 


71 




98,201 


"12 63,151 


9 63J172 


31,446 


31^726 


40,833 


65 






II "4 Grand totals, 1903 

115 Grand totals, 1902 


577,383 


917 402,138 


106 403.161 206,794 


196,367 


230,730 


57.20 


584,512 


1,001 


407,013 


110 


408,124 


209,566 


198,558 


232,663 


57.01 


6 Increases 






































.19 




7,129 


84 


4,875 


4 


4,963 


2,772 


2,191 


1,933 




8 Percentages 


















.23 


99.75 


.02 




51.29 


48.71 


57.20 





* Estimated. 

t Including Protestant Separate School. 

tin incorporated villages, included in Counties etc. 
dailv attendance of 17,747. 



there were 28,463 pupils enrolled, with an average 



Kindergarten and Night School pupils are not included. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 



II. — Table B. — Number of pupils in the 



Reading. 



Counties 

(including incorporated 

villages, but not 

cities or towns), etc. 



tf i 8 



03" 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin 

8 Essex 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 

12 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton. N. E. Mus- 

koka, S. Nipissing and 
E. Parry Sound 

14 Halton 

15 Hastings 

16 Huron 

17 Kent 

18 Lambton 

19 Lanark 

20 Leeds & Grenville 

21 Lennox & Addington ... 

22 Lincoln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 

25 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 

'60 Peterborough 

31 Prescott & Russell 

32 Prince Edward 

33 Renfrew 

34 Simcoe & W. Muskoka.. 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria & S. E. Musk. 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 York .'...".'.'... 

42 Eainy River and Thun- 

der Bay 

43 Algoma and Manitou- 

lin 

44 N. Nipissing, etc., and 

W. Parry Sound 

45 Moose Fort 

Totals 



Cities. 

Belleville 

Brantford 

Chatham 

Guelph 

Hamilton ...... 

Kingston 

London 

8 Ottawa 

9 St. Catharines 

10 St. Thomas 

11 Stratford 

12 Toronto 

13 Windsor 

14 Woodstock 

Totals 



621 

2,379 

1,621 

955 

836 

800 

1,213 

1,744 

1,375 

1,152 

3,071 

701 



1,570 

734 

2,573 

1,459 

1,852 

2,195 

1,094 

1,863 

892 

772 

1,610 

1,203 



1,105 



1,356 

1,351 

710 

1,062 
1,248 
1,778 
454 
2,086 
3,336 
1,006 



,425 
127 
149 

585 

847 
,757 



518 
1,779 
1,818 



426 

1,603 

1,033 

722 

611 

615 

693 

1,322 

840 

594 

1,945 

522 



789 
433 

1,522 



1,214 

1,108 

1,613 
666 

1,320 
590 
528 

1,244 
726 
786 
980 
994 
562 
854 
868 
846 
312 

1,330 

2,168 
498 

1,038 
811 
798 

1,009 
618 

1,499 

352 

989 

1,004 



62,782 41,001 



332 

566 
306 
317 

1,256 
497 
982 
956 
358 
499 
245 

5,643 
596 
386 



209 
356 
204 
191 

1,074 
282 
770 
587 
228 
228 
237 

3,454 
307 
222 



549 
1,959 
1,124 

746 
1,047 

990 
1,015 
1,343 

948 

746 
2,749 

679 



884 

535 

1.686 

1,924 

1,462 

1,480! 

810 

1,653! 

795 

621 

1,542 

1,134 

1,223 

1,286 

i,i4o; 

643 
1,112 

9771 

813; 

461 

1,379; 
2 ,836 

881 
1,388 
1,393 

916 1 
1,533 

815 
2,207| 



704 

2,027 

1,203 

983 

724 

994 

1,214 

1,129 

1,186 

596 

2,569 

720 



912 

615 

1,552 

2,131 

1,352 

1,721 

8 41 

1,688 

836 

776 

1,913 

1,010 

1,168 

1,359 

1,274 

835 

1,656 

946 

770 

509 

1,291 

2,821 

751 

1,440 

1,20" 

1,072 

1,690 

1,110 

2,330 



261 
1,052 
1,052 



378 
1,173 



909 
3 



51,792 54,090 



235 
396 
286 
290 

1,310 
338 

1,408 
709 
231 
384 
218 

6,772 
363 
311 



213 
704 
341 
453 

2,227 
634 

1,290 

1,333 
379 
433 
416 

6,497 
296 
203 



649 
1,92 
1,3. 

884 

749 

853 
1,147 

784 
1,124 

632 
2,120 

854 



630 

787 

1.161 

2,429 



521 



720 

1,933 

886 

863 

1,897 

1,157 

1,156 

1,526 

1,517 

834 

1,286 

969 

769 

703 

1,111 

2,972 

690 

1,278 

777 

976 

1,690 

1,039 

2,307 

231 

907 

558 
2 



115 
574 
338 
181 
284 
190 
526 
122 
115 
61 
398 
167 



178 
176 
295 
874 
634 
436 
156 
316 
167 
90 
575 
202 
225 
240 
455 
180 
237 
118 
197 
211 
243 
853 
150 
242 
171 
260 
413 
280 
200 

35 

172 



3,038 
10,068 
6,172 
4,293 
4,135 
4,442 
5,718 
6,316 
5,588 
3,781 
12,495 
3,637 



4,652 
3,280 
8.789 
9,895 
7,841 
8,995 
4,287 
8,522 
4,166 
3,537 
8,781 
5,313 
5,455 
6,627 
6,547 
3,692 
6,015 
5,126 
4,842; 
2,627| 
7,040 ! 

14,896; 
3,976 
6,504^ 
5,488; 
5,084 
7,849 
4,709 

11,000, 



3,064 
10,354 

6,284! 

4,431! 

4,203: 

4,442; 

5,758 

6,336; 

5,588 

3,781 l 
12,752; 

3,635i 



4,628 
3,280 
8,789 
9,992 
7,828 
9,076 
4,287 
8,560 
4,166 
3,605 
8,781 
5,351 
5,557 
6,713 
6,656 
3,694 
6,122 
5,041 
5,044 
2,642 
7,253 
14,929 
3,976 
6,643 



3,036 
9,902 
6,058 
4,231 
4,048 
4,385 



276 

588 
781 



488 
062 
843 
709 



11,253 



1,725 1,741 



5,834: 

4,661 
19 



5,847 

4,732 
19 



52,074 12,137 267 , 457 269 , 935 260,601 



12,466 
3,625 



4,171 
3,280 

8.780 
9,597 
7,929 
8,405 
4,287 
8,263 
4,149 
3,362 
8,781 
5,273 
5,171 
6,5 66 
6,483 
3,579 
5,795 
4,601 
4,716 
2,621 
6,199 

14,077 
3,815 
6,285 
5,488 
5,001 
7,742 
4,709 

10,775 

1.692 

5,678 
4,197 



310 
488 
406 
339 

1,750 
623 

1,225 

1,182 
263 
390 
378 

6,063 
159 
470 



12,939 8,349 13,25115,419 14,046 2,109 66,113- 66,113; 65,717 



1,299 

52 2,562! 
J 1,543 

112 1,702! 

497 8,114 

2,374 

! 5,675; 

131 4,898 

1,459 

1,934 

1,494 

1 ,317i 29,746 

1.721 

1,592 



1,299 
2,562 
1,543 
1,702 
8,114 
2,374 
5,675 
4,898 
1,459 
1,934 
1,494 
29,746 
1,721 
1,592 



299 
562 
543 
702 
114 
336 
675 
898 
101 
934 
494 
746 
721 
592 



11)04 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
various branches of instruction. 



x* 




fl.2 


5 


t-c' 



w 


J 

0J05- 




S 


'3h 




>> 




35 M 


6 






03 O 






& 


13 XX 


0) 




<-. 








08 

£) 

o 


3 




"So 


a 
a 

as 


la 


oj.S 


M 
M 

O 
O 


53 

ho 


a 



0) 


a 

eg 



si 



be 


CJ 


S3 





w 


U 


Ph 


Q 


cq 


< 





cq 


3 


*^ 


• 1 2,128 ! 1,808: 2,015 


783 


1,225 


922 


1,697 


102 


104 


99 


17 


25 


506 


2 6,772 4,709 6,724 


2,626 


4,227 


4,58 2 


4,851 


437 


580 


542 


184 


268 


1,302 


3 4,215 2,908 4,395 


1,854 


2,362 


1,987 


3,458 


327 


316 


313 


249 


132 


1,043 


4 3,142 2,405 2,650 


1,221 


1,888 


1,750 


2,660 


228 


191 


188 


67 


145 


738 


5 3,434 2,784 3,105 


1,159 


1,478 


1,713 


2,519 


217 


269 


255 


29 


132 


754 


6 3,010 1,658 2,456 


833 


1,080 


1,031 


1,260 


197 


183 


163 


47 


44 


192 


7 4,424 3,161 3,812 


1,882 


2,716 


2,957 


3,377 


512 


513 


486 


183 


159 


1,156 


8 3,847 2,802 3,517 


941 


2,106 


5,255 


3,551 


129 


117 


103 


64 


59 


713 


9 3,728 1,921; 2,975 


1,362 


2,031 


1,750 


2,565 


87 


78 


69 


25 


9 


413 


10 2,216 1,017 1,955 


701 


957 


823 


1,475 


57 


56 


55 


32 


11 


195 


11 9,178 6,513 7,648 


2,777 


4,998 


7,618 


7,558 


425 


363 


343 


163 


111 


1,564 


12 2,748 1,795 2,569 


1,063 


1,413 


1,430 


2,102 


149 


156 


130 


16 


30 


985 


• 
13 2,652 1,279 2,356 


1,117 


1,565 


1,437 


2,203 


149 


139 


144 


16 


62 


247 


14 2,515 1,409] 2,405 


1,022 


1,393 


1,232 


1,716 


164 


173 


173 


66 


55 


565 


15 5,2S8 4,119 


5,158 


1,498 


2,961 


4,811 


5,550 


408 


278 


266 


100 


73 


811 


16 7,7l3 5,372 


7,182 


3,273 


4,833 


3,335 


4,254 


785 


854 


834 


214 


183 


880 


17 6,762 


5,047 


5,378 


2,418 


3,128 


3,456 


4,829 


631 


635 


635 


119 


171 


1,909 


18 5,6?1 


6,152 


5,672 


2,200 


3,759 


3,727 


5,468 


361 


418 


402 


138 


94 


1,541 


19 2,6 7 5 


1,311 


2,410 


948 


1,476 


1,102 


2,300 


179 


187 


184 


208 


94 


369 


20 6,ll9 


4,394 


5,902| 


2,980 


3,613 


3,267 


4,464 


295 


287 


274 


147 


125 


1,343 


21 2,9^3 


1,578 


2,531 


1,250 


1,750 


1,657 


2,414 


155 


136 


121 


31 


45 


840 


22 2,5 ; »9 


1,605 


2,392 


1,027 


1,610 


1,302 


1,565 


111 


57 


37 


96 


122 


582 


23 6,5 4 3 6,333 


5,801 


2,572 


3,953 


4,358 


6,594 


536 


542 


533 


138 


n 


2,279 


24 3,8 9 9 2,959 


3,527 


1,536 


1,993 


1,834 


3,373 


232 


188 


176 


80 


1,158 


25 3,7'3 2,142 


3,516 


1,127 


1,671 


1,468 


2,016 


205 


215 


176 


28 


58 


301 


26 4,5»2 3,207 


4,197 


2,014 


2,604 


2,192 


2,485 


240 


230 


213 


31 


3 


884 


27 4,8 :; 8| 2,647 


4,5 26 


1,974 


2,826 


2,363 


2,725 


364 


433 


396 


82 


164 


965 


28 2,602 1,586 


2,282 


1,550 


1,704 


1,223 


2,064 


172 


183 


183 




37 


266 


29 4,470 3,614 


4,160 


1,664 


3,012 


1,561 


5,118 


231 


210 


202 


" "64 


27 


1,477 


30 3,122: 2,087 


2,808 


1,282 


1,781 


1,703 


2,235 


119 


105 


96 


46 


6 


277 


31 2, 7ii8; 1,827 


2,627! 


1,024 


' 1,563 


1,457 


3,101 


199 


195 


193 


199 


54 


671 


32 2,119 1,022 


2,015 


1,004 


1,165 


1,439 


1,352 


213 


200 


158 


221 


86 


1,020 


33 3,943 1,658 


3 , 762 


1,464 


2,099 


1,777 


1,978 


248 


229 


224 


24 


99 


356 


34 9,4U1 7,291 


8,827 


4,155 


6,065 


5,609 


9,411 


923 


799 


759 


312 


332 


2,240 


35 2,8 8 1,594 


2,630 


940 


1,134 


1,275 


1,961 


146 


120 


119 


8 


52 


439 


36 4,460 2 ,174j 3,843 


1,680 


2,323 


1,909 


2,186 


224 


222 


204 


68 


29 


518 


37 3,550 3,871 2,157! 


745 


1,874 


952 


3,034 


143 


132 


127 


50 


7 


318 


38 3,390 2,528 3,266 


1,584 


2,131 


1,920 


2,155 


252 


248 


215 


101 


5 


406 


39 5,382 4,029 


4,922: 


2,221 


3,579 


3,086 


4,358 


402 


389 


377 


257 


153 


1,097 


40 3,435 2,466 


3,288: 


1,470 


2,079 


1,338 


2,863 


243 


234 


230 


218 


112 


1,033 


41 8,255 6,082 


7,680 


2,943 


4,251 


3,870 


4,983 


184 


192 


160 


159 


57 


761 


42 997 


415 
1,435 


871 
2,932 


286 
1,285 


499 
2,049 


576 
1,925 


411 
1,614 


36 
197 


31 

148 


29 
146 






170 


43 3,280 


28 


16 


265 


44 2,558 


925 


2,345 


787 


1,157 


943 


1,491 


90 


73 


65 


27 


44 


111 


45 3 


19 


6 












2 














------- 












182,877 127,658 167,195 


70,242 


104,081 


101,922 


139,344 


11,704 


11,410 


10,797 


4,352 


3,596 


35,760 


758 7351 885 


310 
540 
526 
339 

2,227 


523 
1,261 

747 

792 

2,912 


551 

2,562 

642 

792 

4,541 


926 
2,562 
1,543 
1,702 
8,114 








2,562 2,562 1,647 


52 









* 1,346 1,543 1,346 






. . . . . ..... ...... 


4 l,li>4 1,702 1,702 


112 
497 








5 5,961 8,053 6,858 




497 


"'469 


i i 646 


385 




6 1,876| 2 , 282| 1,894 

7 5,675 5,675! 2,515 


623 
835 

1,313 
263 
390 
378 

5,782 


958 

1,743 

2,646 

465 

823 

588 

7,510 


991 
5,675 
2,646 

465 
1,207 

938 
17,520 


2,374 
5,675 
4,898 






623 



















8 2,646 1,543 2,646 


"*i3i 


82 


82 








9 873 873 






10 1,207 1,207 


823 

1,494 

27,839 








11 1,138 1,034 1,260 








1228,694 28,844 27,958 


*3',08i 


202 


785 


2^6i5 




309 


13 962 1,721 962 


154 
470 


460 
673 


1,721 
704 


.1,721 














14 984 l,592i 673 


'. .......... '. ...... 










55,876 


57,286 




52,426 


14.150 


22,101 


40,955 


59,671 


3,873 


781 


1,959 


4,261 


385 


309 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



II.— Table B.— 



THE PUBLIC 
Number of pupils in the 



Towns. 







Reading. 








'd 




o 


S3M 




03 


d 


0>-u 






0) 


«a 


P5 


M 


p! 




*JPM 


d 


^3 


,cj 












1—1 




C4 


CO 


-* 



AS 



5^ 



Alexandria 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Amherstburg ... 

Arnprior 

Aurora 

Aylmer 

8 Barrie 

9 Berlin 

10 Blenheim 

11 Bothwell 

12 Bowmanville ... 

13 Bracebridge 

14 Brampton 

15 Brockville 

16 Bruce Mines ... 

17 Cache Bay 

18 Carleton Place 

19 Clinton 

20 Cobourg 

2. Col.ingwood ... 
n Copper Cliff .. .. 

23 Cornwall 

24 Deseronto 

9 5 Dresden 

25 Dundas 

27 Dunnville 

28 Durham 

29 East Toronto 

30 Essex 

31 Forest 

32 Fort Frances .. 

33 Fort William 

34 Gait 

?5 Oananoque ... 

36 Goderich 

37 Gore Bay 

38 Gravenhurst ... 

39 Barriaton 

40 Hawkesbury ... 

41 Hespeler 

*2 Huntsville 

43 Irgersoll 

44 Kincardine ... 

45 Kingsville 

46 Leamington ... 

47 Lindsay 

48 Listowel 

49 Little Current 

50 Mattawa , 

51 Meaford 

5? Midland 

53 Milton 

R. "Mitchell 

55 Mount Forest 

5 • Napanee 

5 7 New Liskeard 

58 Newmarket ... 
'•9 Niagara 

60 Niagara Falls 

61 North Bay 

6? North Toronto 
M Oakyille 

64 Orangeville 

65 Orillia 

6* Oshawa 

67 Owen Sound ... 

68 Palmerston 

6' 1 Paris 

70 Parkhill 

71 Parry Sound .. 



11 

30 

85 

54 

140 

96 

57 

222 

244 

99 

47 

106 

270 

112 

258 

41 

93 

250 

84 

91 

455 

145 

142 

207 

130 

145 

122 

102 

230 

123 

73 

61 

253 

307 

240 

90 

49 

168 

59 

30 

146 

179 

160 

73 

105 

106 

250 

111 

114 

22 

100 

327 

87 

58 

75 

121 

106 

104 

50 

158 

228 

166 

66 

118 

233 

187 

402 

98 

107 

44 

365 



11 


24 


82 


74 


51 


117 


57 


58 


120 


120 


54 


84 


66 


88 


129 


281 


292 


400 


42 


108 


19 


28 


57 


96 


152 


133 


83 


79 


162 


279 


35 


60 


17 


46 


172 


148 


50 


103 


79 


119 


240 


185 


46 


81 


119 


153 


110 


135 


83 


36 


113 


62 


86 


92 


64 


76 


122 


87 


74 


63 


5 2 


56 


31 


34 


98 


124 


93 


308 


69 


150 


77 


130 


29 


57 


97 


166 


45 


60 


24 


26 


54 


67 


108 


121 


72 


191 


63 


81 


61 


82 


88 


129 


124 


262 


65 


89 


29 


80 


12 


10 


94 


103 


158 


183 


54 


56 


54 


49 


49 


102 


88 


94 


25 


51 


32 


139 


19 


47 


102 


143 


89 


81 


87 


80 


78 


59 


90 


121 


141 


173 


no 


141 


213 


377 


49 


52 


88 


85 


41 


41 


80 


158 



17 
41 
67 

46 

99 

75 

98 

241 

347 

78 

30 

102 

199 

149 

261 

40 

17 

140 

120 

138 

304 

38 

115 

137 

68 

107 

73 

53 

140 

58 

44 

30 

105 

318 

155 

167 

49 

93 

80 

30 

128 

102 

194 

131 

84 

99 

278 

143 

43 

6 

62 

158 

40 

112 

88 

100 

53 

74 

58 

171 

75 

93 

87 

103 

194 

213 

365 

93 

123 

46 

124 



21 

78 

74 

26 

98 

65 

110 

216 

221 

27 

36 

109 

53 

92 

284 

21 

18 

192 

74 

117 

287 

28 

123 

66 

53 

136 

105 

71 

124 

41 

79 

23 

136 

299 

144 

,134 

48 

82 

90 

29 

82 

45 

168 

110 

43 

74 

203 

131 

50 

17 

50 

96 

72 

96 

111 

146 

42 

85 

66 

171 

91 

82! 

561 

110 

167j 

126! 

383 

63 

92 

49! 

124 



14 



46 



28 



84 

402 
394 
291 
577 
374 
419 

1,091 

1,504 
373 
210 
470 
807 
515 

1,244 
216 
196 
902 
431 
544 

1,471 
352 
652 
655 
427 
563 
478 
450 
703 
359 
304 
193 
716 

1,325 
758 
598 
278 
606 
334 
139 
503 
591 
785 
458 
403 
496 

1.117 
539 
331 
77 
409 
971 
383 
369 
425 
549 
280 
434 
240 
745 
564 
525 
346 
542 
967 
777 

1,740 
385 
495 
221 
892 



84 
402 
394 
291 
577! 
374 
419 

1,091 

1,504! 
394 
210! 
470 
807 
515 

1,244 
238 
196 
902 
431 
5441 

1,471 
352' 
652! 
655! 
427! 
563 
478 
450 
703 
359 
304 
193 
716 

1,325 
758 
598 
278 
606 
334 
139 



503 
601 
785 
458 
403 
496 
949 
539 
331 
77 
409 
971 



425 
549 
280 
434 
240 
745 
564 
525 
346 
542 
967 
777 
1,740 
385 
495 
221 
917 



84 
402 
394 
291 
577 
374 
419 

1,091 

1,504 
394 
210 
470 
807 
515 

1,244 
216 
196 
902 
431 
544 

1,471 
352 
652 
655 
427 
563 
270 
450 
703 
359 
304 
193 
716 

1,325 
758 
598 
253 
606 
334 
139 
503 
601 
785 
458 
403 
496 

1,087 
539 
331 
77 
409 
971 
362 
311 
425 
549 
280 
434 
240 
745 
564 
525 
346 
542 
700 
777 

1,740 
385 
495 
221 
892 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

various branches of instruction. — Continued. 



■a 

CD 
O 


6 
"53 


pi .2 

S 

P 




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u 


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2 
3 
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5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 


84 
402 

289 
181 
317 
374 
419 
957 
968 
295 
210 
307 
627 
370 

1,244 
216 
86 
480 
297 
374 

1,471 
209 
532 
448 
270 
305 
270 
270 
473 
192 
179 
193 
475 

1,018 
518 
431 
154 
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275 
139 
357 
352 
785 
337 
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317 
722 
363 
188 
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309 

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902 
431 
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1,397 
352 
652 
655 
340 
563 
373 
229 
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193 
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1,325 
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598 

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785 
458 
403 

900 
539 
331 
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409 
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383 
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425 
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280 

564 
525 

j 346 
542 
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' 1,74C 
295 

221 


62 

402 
218 
237 
577 
374 
419 
920 
768 
295 
210 
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295 
515 
1,244 
238 
86 
480 
297 
255 
971 
173 
652 
338 
270 
305 
204 
284 
473 
192 
304 
132 
699 
970 
375 
431 
179 
316 
275 
139 
357 
- 422 
569 
458 
328 
360 
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539 
217 
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301 
340 
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298 
240 
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! 247 
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202 
334 
720 
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1,135 
287 
215 
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472 


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264 

74 

61 

98 

65 

87 

419 

221 

104 

78 

109 

53 

92 

284 

62 

23 

192 

74 

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591 

80 

238 

66 

176 

136 

64 

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136 

41 

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176 

144 

134 

69 

112 

90 

29 

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91 

168 

110 

71 

74 

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131 

108 

27 

50 

303 

125 

96 

111 

246 

98 

159 

124 

342 

166 

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56 

213 

i 277 

72 

383 

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j 92 

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166 


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104 
107 
197 
124 
208 
459 
568 
128 
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201 
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415 
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166 
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143 
213 
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577 
124 
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497 
568 
147 

94 
256 

53 

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1,244 

61 

40 
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74 

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1,471 

80 
391 
203 
121 
563 
149 
200 
124 
359 
123 

53 

239 

1,325 

299 

134 

68 
150 
275 

59 
133 
268 
785 
401 
271 
390 
317 
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331 

96 
301 
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98 

85 
190 
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247 

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334 

334 

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495 
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84 

310 

42 

380 

309 

186 

1,036 

1,504 

96 

160 

470 

807 

471 

1,244 

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431 
544 

1,471 

652 
655 

"*563 

329 
450 
703 
292 
225 
145 
603 
761 
329 
598 

1.25 
275 
139 

785 
458 
403 












21 


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97 


97 


49 


97 




35 


50 


50 


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50 


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57 


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28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 


40 


84 


84 


40 


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14 


14 


14 








67 
















35 
36 

37 

38 


























21 


46 


46 




20 




39 














40 














41 


12 
46 


12 

46 


12 
46 






12 


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46 






43 






44 














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28 


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539 
331 

409 
971 
383 
369 
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15 
10 


15 
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52 
53 
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49 

74 


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74 


18 


18 

40 


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56 














57 


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3 


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58 








59 














60 




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346 

542 

! 108 

! 177 

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17 


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63 








64 














65 


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66 







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67 







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68 
69 


36 


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r 



10 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
II. — Table B — Number of pupils in the 





Reading. 














03 








I-.' 

o 




Towns. 


1- 




03 
33 






o3 


bog 

WW 


tab 


"3 


60 

a 
"9 




«a 


03 "g 


« 




« 




° 2 


a 




^Ph 




T3 

CM 




>0 

CO 


£ 


•eg 


G 

£ 


<j 





72 Pembroke 

*73 Penetanguisheue . 

74 Perth 

75 Peterborough ... . 

76 Petrolea 

77 Picton 

78 Port Arthur 

79 Port Hope 

80 Prescott 

81 Preston 

82 Rat Portage 

83 Renfrew 

PA Ridgetown 

85 St. Mary's 

86 Sandwich 

87 Sarnia 

88 Sault Ste. Marie . 

89 Seaforth 

90 Simcoe 

91 Smith's Falls 

92 Stayner 

93 Strathroy 

94 Sturgeon Falls... . 

95 Sudbury 

96 Thessalon 

97 Thornbury 

93 Thorold 

99 Tillsonburg 

100 Toronto Junction. 

101 Trenton 

102 Uxbridge 

103 Vankleekhill 

104 Walkerton 

105 Walk-TTille 

106 Wallaceburg 

107 Waterloo 

103 Welland '.. 

"hitbv 

1 1 Wiarton 

111 Wingham 

Totals 

Totals, 
tl Counties, etc 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 



170 


93 


231 


111 


112 


61 


383 


25 6 


243 


160 


20 2 


66 


170 


154 


185 


167 


109 


921 


91 


53! 


312 


101 


123 


43 


112 


48 


99 


87 


55 


11 


454 


223 


470 


219 


86 


45 


115 


51 


326 


139 


78 


39 


105 


67 


60 


43 


62 


26 


126 


27 


30 


21 


72 


60 


81 


51 


351 


280 


133 


99 


89 


42 


61 


11 


91 


73 


81 


46 


166 


119 


110 


104 


55 


54 


75 


50 


195 


142 


94 


74! 



113 

116 
130 

307| 

133 

103 

106 

156 

58; 

105 

132! 

67 

115! 

96 

20| 

256 

211 

38; 

101; 

218 

41! 

114 

26 ! 

41 

63 

26 

43| 

104! 

207! 

160, 

77 

29 

74 

68 

85 

133 

45 

65 

134 

126 



88 

74 

109 

304 

202 

103 

119 

160 

52 

87 

165 

75 

79 

163 

37 



188 
76 
117 
307 
137 
112 
149 
170 
117 
54 
1161 
1151 
106 ! 
126 
23 



23 



652 

631! 
529 

,557) 
875' 
586 
698, 
838 1 
428, 
390 1 
826 
423; 
460 
571 
147 



265 


271 





1,469 


267 


158 




1.325 


48 


109 





326 


59 


133 




45 9 


209 


197 




1,089 


33 


34 


41 


236 


88 


124 




498 


48 


33 


15 


225 


45 


35 


21 


230 


39 


56 


14 


325 


28 


48 


7 


160 


79 


64 




318 


112 


126 




474 


281 


265 




1,384 


84 


122 




598 


77 


60 




345 


48 


61 




210 


80 


132 




450 


66 


43 


27 


331 


76 


38 


99 


544 


127 


116 




590 


34 


64 




252 


85 


104 




379| 


101 


76 





649 


123 


58 


108 


583; 



652 

631: 

529! 

1,557! 

875' 
586! 
698i 
838: 
42S. 
390; 
826 
423! 
. 450: 

571; 

147 

1,469 

1,325 

■ 326! 

459' 

1,089 

266 

498! 

225[ 

230: 

3251 

160; 

318! 

474j 

1,384; 

598! 
345: 
210 
450! 
331' 
583; 
590! 
252; 
379! 
649 
583! 



652 
631 
528 
557 
875 
588 
698 
838 
428 
390 
826 
423 
460 
517 
147 

,469 

,325 
326 
459 

,089 
236 
498 
225 
230 
325 
160 
318 
474 

,384 
598 
346 
210 
450 
331 
544 
590 
252 
379 
649 
485 



16,151 9,427 12,215 12,428 11,671 



62,782 
12,939 
16,151 



4 Grand totals, 1903 

5 Grand totals, 1902 



• 91,872 
! 92,941 



41,001 51,792 54,090, 52,074 
8,349 13,251! 15,419 14,046 
9,427 12,215 12,428! 11,671 



58,777! 77,258 81,937! 77,791 
61,062 77,023; 82.724! 77,645 



6 Increases 

7 Decreases 



8 Percentages 



1,069 2,285 



22.79, 14.58 



235 



7871 



146 



19.16 20.32 



19.3 



1,280 63-, 024! 63,003 62,294 



12,137 267, 457269 , 935 260,601 
2,109 66,113 66,113! 65,717 
1,280 63,024 63,003 62,294 



15,5 26 396,594 399,051 388,612 
16,729 399,352 403,609 392,078 



1,203 2,758 4,558! 3,465 
3.85, 98.37i 98.98! 96. 29 



♦Including Protestant Separate School . 
fin incorporated villages, included in Counties, etc. 
II, 4,323 ; '2nd, 5,170 ; 3rd, 5,019 ; 4th, 5,283 ; 5th, 2,101. 



the numbers in the Readers were : 1st, Part I, 6,507 ; Part 



19(M 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



II 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 



various branches of instruction. — Concluded. 





ts a 




S O 




aS-j3 












a o 






o 


2 


go 


r^, 


O 



72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

85 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 



482 
393 
S56 
918 
569 
586 
409 
838 
278 
277 
826 
257 
460 
385 
92 
792 
870 
195 
293 
,089 
188 
326 
123 
142 
172 
160 
238 
342 
726 
366 
223 
149 
335 
229 
319 
385 
252 
379 
248 
415 



652 
465 
529 
439 
446 
586 



838 
428 
390 
826 
423 
392 
63 



1,149 

1.325! 

326| 

459; 

1,089 

141 

498 

59 

62 

3251 

160! 



474 
384! 
209 
345! 
210 
450 
331! 
268! 



379' 
649 
415 



389 
393 
356 
918 
571 
371 
409 
476 
227 
188 
513 
423 
460 
475 
81 

,313 
755 
195 
192 

,089 
149 
326 
123 
216 
109 
160 
213 
474 
726 
429 
345 
210 
450 
229 
448 
370 
133 
379 
248 
415 



18 

99 

117 

223 

137 

215 

149 

170 

169 

54 

116 

96 

185 

126 

48 

197 

92 

109 

133 

197 

108 

64 

48 

56 

70 

55 

64 

238 

265 

122 

60 

61 

132 

96 

179 

116 

98 

104 

76 

170 



-d • 




a v 




!* 


'3 


bo«- 




3& 


«l 




a3.52 

•po 


Ph 


ft 



389 
173 
168 
611 
339 
215 
268 
253 
169 
141 
281 
190 
185 
289 

48 
536 
425 
147 
192 
291 

45 
212 

96 
101 
109 

83 
161 
238 
546 
206 

94 
109 
212 
136 
174 
168 
133 
189 
177 
170 



389 
99 
117 
611 
403 
586 
268 
330 
169 
141 
281 
190 
300 
126 
48 1 

984: 

720 

109 

459 

1,089 

34 
498 

48 
105 

70 
130 
119 
295 
265 
206 
223, 
149! 
450 
243 

68! 
116 
133 
379 
230 

58 



652 
182i 
529' 
857! 
875) 
586! 
289 
838 
428 



23 



423 
354 
132 



357 

325 

195 

459 

089 

11 

498 

15 
21 
14 

160 7 



82 



474 

384 



21 



41 



345 
210 

450 

331 27 

... 60 

97? 

252! 

379! 

261 

49 



45,353 46,993 44 , 283J14 , 532J 23 



1 182,877 127,658 167 ,195 70 , 242 104 , 081 

2 56,876 57,286 52,42614,150 22,101 

3 46,353 46,993 44,28314,532 23,983 



32,070 43,322 1,519 



101,922 139, 34411, 704 
40,955[ 59,671! 3,873 
32,070 43,322! 1,519 



284,106 231,937 263 , 904 98 , 924 150,165 174 ,947| 242 , 337J 17 ,096 
288,967 236,797 268,763 98 , 738 148 , 637 179 ,772! 242 , 115! 17 ,091 



4,861! 4,860 4,859 



1861 1,528 



70.47 57.52 65.46 24.54 37.24 



4,825 



43.39 



2221 



60.11) 4.24 



108 



1,205 



11,410 

781 

1,205 



13,396 
14,625 



1,229 



3.32 



21 



£3-3 



62 



318 



41 



11 



11 



15 
21 



14 



I?! 



108 



3 r J 



49 



5 3 



1,188 687 983 



.It 



10,797 4,352 3,596 35,76t 
1,9594,261 385 30» 

1,188 687 983 Itt 



13,944 9,300 4,964 3C.2S8 
14,644!7,298 4,152 43,286 



700! 



2,002 8i: 



,02T 



3.45 2.3 1.23 S.lt 



12 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 



III. — Table C. — Teachers, Salaries 





A 
a 

33 

o 






Salaries. 


Counties, 


u 

S3 


OS ,3 


J5 <s 


(including incorporated villages, but not 


O 






a 


3 2 

Kg 


OS* 

to *^ 


cities or towns) etc. 






a 


B2_J 

ot3 


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3 

3 


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m. 






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& 


b 


w 


< 


< 


1 Brant 


70 


19 


51 


$ 

575 


396 


324 


2 Bruce 


224 


77 


147 


900 


395 


293 


3 Carleton 


141 


28 


113 


600 


401 


292 


4 Dufferin 


105 


14 


91 


700 


376 


293 


5 Dundas 


110 


43 


67 


800 


366 


270 


6 Durham 


116 


20 


96 


600 


415 


292 


7 Elgin 


131 


37 


94 


550 


409 


297 




124 


38 


86 


550 


384 
300 


307 
242 


9 Prontenac 


154 


18 


136 


500 


10 Glengarry 


83 


12 


71 


550 


349 


262 


11 Grey 


248 


78 


170 


725 


369 


289 


12 Haldimand 


94 


17 


77 


650 


428 


292 


13 Haliburton, N. E. Muskoka, S. 














Nipissing and E. Parry Sound... 


133 


24 


109 


600 


355 


231 


14 Halton 


77 


19 


58 


650 


408 


308 


15 Hastings 


200 


53 


147 


800 


367 


282 


16 Huron 


222 


85 


137 


800 


403 


294 


17 Kent 


149 


40 


109 


720 


420 


324 


18 Lambton 


205 


45 


160 


■. 600 


399 


306 


19 Lanark 


132 


12 


120 


600 


333 


246 


20 Leeds and Grenville 


262 


51 


211 


700 


334 


257 


21 Lennox and Addington 


126 


23 


103 


550 


311 


250 


22 Lincoln 


82 


26 


56 


700 


436 


281 


23 Middlesex 


206 


61 


145 


525 


393 


303 


24 Norfolk 


121 


40 


81 


600 


358 


279 


25 Northumberalnd 


128 


41 


87 


700 


388 


281 


25 Ontario 


141 


35 


106 


750 


395 


292 


27 Oxford 


139 


56 


83 


650 


438 


305 


28 Peel 


89 
122 


31 
45 


58 

77 


625 

510 


386 
400 


308 


29 Perth 


311 


30 Peterborough 


116 


33 


83 


650 


357 


279 


31 Prescott and Russell 


111 


24 


87 


850 


357 


245 


32 Prince Edward 


82 


26 


56 


500 


337 


284 




157 
306 


25 
104 


132 
202 


600 
750 


348 
392 


257 


34 Simcoe and W. Muskoka 


282 


35 Stormont 


89 


21 


68 


475 


355 


267 


36 Victoria and S. E. Muskoka 


167 


48 


119 


600 


371 


258 


37 "Waterloo 


116 


48 


68 


625 


439 


307 


38 Welland 


105 


20 


85 


> 720 


432 


_ 288 


39 Wellington 


168 


60 


108 


650 


397 


312 


40 Wentworth 


96 


33 


63 


550 


412 


308 


41 York 


207 


75 


132 


750 


424 


307 


42 Rainy River and Thunder Bay... 


44 


19 


25 


850 


404 


337 


43 Algoma and Manitoulin 


134 
156 


42 
20 


92 
136 


600 
500 


358 
335 


294 


44 N. Nipiss'g, etc., & W. Pa'y Sound 


252 




6,188 


1,686 


4,502 


900 


387 


283 


•1 Totals, Counties, etc 


1,273 


189 


1,084 


1,600 


951 


491 


2 Cities '.'.'.'.'.'. 


1,099 


187 


912 


1,200 


678 


327 


3 Towns 


8,560 


2,062 


6,498 


1.600 1 


465 ! 


324 


t4 Grand totals, 1903 


8,497 


2,200 


6,297 


1,600 


436 


313 


t5 Grand totals, 1902 
















63 




201 




29 


11 






138 











7 Decreases 











.. 24.09 


75.91 








8 Percentages 









(*) In incorporated villages, included in Counties, etc.. there were 531 teachers, 1-14 male and 387 female, with 
average salaries of $555 and $285 respectively. 77 held First Class. 354 Second Class, and 93 Third Class cei I 
17 were University graduates. 

(f) Kindergarten and Night'Sehool teachers not ia< luded. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



13 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 



Certificates, etc. 



QJ O 

oS 2 a> 

O 03—.^ 
^•^ g oj 

a-^ o o 



r Q'0 



Certificates. 



>S 
go 

Ph 



go 

Ph 



O O 

-CO 
en ►_ 
C3^ 

^8 



2 . 

S o 
* pq 
O >, 

O O 

on 
a>^ 



1 


44 
104 
78 
36 
42 
59 
63 
46 
35 
27 
103 
50 

4 
45 
69 

133 
79 

114 
39 
97 
28 
45 

120 
51 
78 
71 
80 
51 
77 
47 
20 
28 
23 

104 
25 
54 
72 
41 
87 
61 

146 
13 
31 
24 




5 

16 

2 

5 

4 
4 
8 

4 
2 
4 
7 
7 

4 
6 
4 
11 
5 
7 


39 
90 
76 
33 
37 
55 
57 
43 
33 
23 
89 
43 

19 
39 
65 

123 
77 

107 

* 39 

93 

27 

42 

115 
50 
74 
67 
73 
46 
70 
44 
19 
26 
22 
96 
23 
52 
67 
37 
82 
53 

148 
10 
38 
27 






26 
110 
55 
66 
69 
56 
66 
66 
77 
43 
140 
44 

77 
31 

127 
88 
65 
84 
81 

163 
82 
32 
79 
67 
48 
70 
57 
38 
45 
47 
46 
46 

102 

195 
60 
78 
42 
- 60 
77 
34 
54 
17 
23 
78 






2 


4 
1 
3 

2 




1 


7 
7 
1 


1 


3 


1 




4 






5 








6 




1 






7 










8 


1 
8 
3 






6 
41 
13 

4 


5 


9 




1 




10 






11 




7 


1 


12 


1 

1 
1 






13 






33 

1 
4 




14 








15 








Iff 










17 








2 
6 
10 
1 
3 




18 


1 

2 
2 
3 




1 




19 


2 




?0 


5 
1 

5 
7 
2 
3 
4 
8 
5 
7 
3 
3 
2 
2 
12 
2 
3 
6 
4 
8 
9 
2 
1 
7 
4 






21 


1 


1 

1 


11 
2 


?3 






5 




24 






2 

1 




?5 


1 




2 




?,6 






7!7 


1 


1 








?8 








?9 












30 






1 


20 
6 
8 

29 
3 
3 

20 


1 


31 







37 


R? 










33 


2 
2 


1 




1 


34 






35 




1 




36 




1 


1$ 


37 




1 




38 




4 






39 






1 




40 










41 




2 




1 
16 
33 

44 




49 








43 




3 

1 


2 

1 


28 


44 




1 








1 
2 


2,644 

1,216 

935 


39 
26 

20 


219 
239 
139 


2,488 
986 
818 


17 
10 
10 


22 
8 
6 


3,011 

15 

103 


330 


101 
15 


o 


17 


6 


4 
5 


4,795 

4,601 


85 
81 


597 
595 


4,292 
4,136 


37 

34 


36 

29 


3,129 
3,319 


347 
311 


122 

73 


6 


194 


« 


2 


156 


3 


7 


'*. 'i9o" 


36 


49 











8 


56.02 


1 


6.97 


50.14 








36.55 


4.05 





14 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
IV.— Table D.— School Houses, 







School Houses. 




School Visits. 


Totals. 


00 






















o 




















A 
















5 




o 














c 








w 














a, m 






o 










o 


to 
0) 








u 










o> 


cc 


tiC 


o 




















a> 


£j 






8 
3 


4* 


o 


a 


be 

o 


a 


H 


5 


o 
>> 


3 




fei 


pq 


oq 


fe 


-q 


« 


M 


« 


pq 




1 Counties, etc 


5,324 


2,311 


1 

423 2,293 


1 

297 


10,908 


6,698 


3.219 20,503 41,328 


2 Cities 


171 


148 


17 I 




3,190 


2,526 


750 13,964 20,430 


3 Towns 


239 


166 


28| 45 




2,200 


1,959 


393 2,352 6,904 



4 Grand totals, 1903 ...| 5,734 2,625| 468 2,344 297 16 ,298,11 ,183J 4 ,362; 36 ,819 68 , 662 

5 Grand totals. 1902 



6 Increases 

7 Decreases 



5,671 2,533 


479 


2 


339 


320 


16,378 12,354 


4 


,521 39,030 72,283 

! 


63 92 . 


11 




1 
5 . 










23 


80 


1,171 




159 2,211 3,621 










l 




Percentages i ; 45.78 8.16 40. 



(*) Also 5,690 shrubs and bulbs, and 14,960 plants, 
(f) To each school. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



15 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 



Prayers, etc 













T3 


T3 
















CD 


V 






Maps and Globes. 


Prizes. 


Lectures . 


Trees. 




O 


® 














O 




£2 














-fl 




cq 
























3 








o 


a3 







be 


















be 

CO . 
3 en 


cy 
S 
o 


be 

'co 
S3 


.5.2 


CO 

A 


CO 

25 

-Q ■ 


3S 






CO 

O 




CO 

cu 


2 * 


o 

o 
J2 . 


IB 

o 

.3 


O S3 
©is 


o 


3 

o 




CO O 


u 

o 

o 


CO 




-1 


8« 

2r 


CO CD 


o 

CO 

O 


^ S3. 

CO -3 












^3 




^ ^ 


<- A 


t-i 


>-. O 


o 




1" 


*> EL 


en 




^° 


j§.& 


.Of? 


0) 
fit 


,o'3> 


9 


a 


a 5? 




O 


- 


£ 5 


as 


a-s 


3 


a-S 




s 


S3 » 


~ -H 


>> 


^ 




S"^ 


^aa 


s ? 


S3 


S3 S 


fe 


& 


fc 


fc. 


pq 


PP 


H 


53 


£ 


55 


£ 


55 



1 


44,714 


4,819 


2 


,280 


574 




954 


! 
222 


! 

1,176 


7 


j 
.516 1 


2 


1 
,987 


5 


1 

,152 


2 


,272 


974 


2 
3 


8,101 
2,943 


260 
329 




168 
46 


90j 
35 




26 
94 


57 
67 


83 
161 




*3 

205 




47j 
100 




167 
232 




137 . 




I 
142 

.1 


6 


4 


55,758 


5,408 


2 


,494 


699 


1 


,074 


346 


1,420 


7 


724 


3 


,134 


5 


1 
,551 


2 


i 
,551 


980 


5 


52,503 


5,195 


2 


369 


552 


1 


,232 


258 


1,490 10 


333 


3 


,273 


5 


,492 


2 


,437 


890 



3,255 



213 



125 



147 



158 



88 



70 2,609 



139 



59 



114 



SO 



t .94 



12.19 75.63 24.37 

I 



54.65 96.81; 44.49 17.09 



16 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE FUBLIC 

V.— Table E.— 



Counties (including incorporated villages, 
but not cities or towns) etc. 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 7 7 7 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin 

8 Essex '* 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 77 

12 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton, N.E. Muskoka7s7Nipis-' 
«ing, and E. Parry Sound . . 

14 Halton 

15 Hastings ...... 

16 Huron 

17 Kent '.' 

18 Lambton 

19 Lanark 

20 Leeds and Grenville . ... 777.7777 

21 Lennox and Addington 7 

22 Linooln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk '...".'.'.. 7.7. 77 

25 Northumberland ".'.'..' ... .7. 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 7.7 

30 Peterborough 

31 Prescott and Russell .......777 

32 Prince Edward 

33 Renfrew 

34 Simcoe and W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria and S. E. Muskoka 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 Tork 

42 Rainy River and Thunder Bay 

43 Algoma 

44 N. Nipissing, etc., and W. Parry Sound 

45 Moose Fort 

Totals 

Cities. 

1 Belleville 

2 Brantf ord 

3 Chatham 

4 Guelph 

5 Hamilton 

6 Kingston 

7 London 

8 Ottawa 

9 St. Catharines 

10 St. Thomas 

11 Stratford 

12 Toronto 

13 Windsor 

14 Woodstock 

Totals 





Receipts. 






Municipal 


Clergy Reserve 


Total reeeipts 


Legislative 


grants and 


fund, balances 


for all 


grants. 


assessments. 


and other 


Public School 






sources. 


purposes. 


$ c. 


$ c 


$ c. 


$ c. 


2,364 02 


28,958 11 


22,663 74 


53,985 87 


8,077 12 


92,249 61 


35,282 "0 


135,609 43 


5.093 83 


53,636 17 


16,336 11 


75,066 11 


3,403 00 


43,107 88 


15,609 98 


62,120 86 


3,333 67 


48,976 07 


9,544 75 


61,854 49 


3,279 50 


43,632 54 


17,086 94 


63,998 98 


5,025 53 


50,926 45 


30,467 08 


86,419 06 


4,376 45 


50,790 07 


27,967 03 


83,133 55 


4,232 50 


39,417 26 


16,138 65 


59,788 41 


2,613 55 


27,348 53 


9*435 90 


39,397 98 


8,220 22 


97,709 08 


32,167 03 


138,096 33 


3,149 00 


35,623 92 


16,266 54 


55,039 46 


11,461 48 


30,562 66 


9,246 24 


51,270 38 


2,721 87 


27,465 91 


15,833 97 


46,021 75 


7,633 00 


66,356 92 


31,833 95 


105,823 87 


8,118 62 


83,975 90 


40,673 34 


132,767 86 


6,528 73 


64,576 57 


52,614 07 


123,719 37 


6,424 95 


79,348 62 


37,560 75 


123,334 32 


4,115 98 


37,347 58 


13,962 41 


55>425 97 


7,241 67 


79,182 02 


30,507 27 


116,930 96 


3,833 48 


33,511 45 


16,589 80 


53,934 73 


2,812 50 


34,095 81. 


16,225 81 


53,134 12 


7,350 95 


89,650 31 


38,113 54 


135,114 80 


3,799 40 


42.536 28 


25,609 88 


71,945 56 


4,256 75 


47,973 13 


22,357 04 


74,586 92 


5,748 75 


57,022 38 


25,991 40 


88,762 53 


5,146 75 


59,481 71 


39,874 25 


104.502 71 


2,716 31 


34,636 41 


17,528 53 


54,881 25 


4,531 25 


5? 1 70 62 


29,622 14 


86.324 01 


4,397 55 


40,787 21 


11,918 43 


57,103 19 


3,997 50 


34,091 49 


16,365 33 


54,454 32 


2,340 75 


25,996 o° 


10,790 02 


39.127 69 


6,459 00 


45,381 67 


19,284 47 


71.125 14 


16,806 11 


105.154 82 


52,097 03 


174,057 96 


2,767 75 


27.819 47 


9,044 80 


39,632 02 


9,359 25 


50.912 67 


20,101 60 


80,373 52 


4,030 00 


50,997 58 


42,594 68 


97,622 26 


3,546 74 


40,8*2 94 


21,815 32 


66.2^5 00 


5,950 25 


67,938 53 


35.033 72 


108,922 50 


3,708 33 


37.933-34 


30,143 59 


71,785 26 


7,125 94 


94,782 21 


59,342 32 


161,250 47 


2,963 63 


18,324 2^ 


3,680 61 


24,968 53* 


16,629 20 


39,299 74 


17,873 17 


73,802 11 


13,365 57 
150 00 


33,161 53 


16,608 53 


63,135 63 
150 00 


251,208 40 


2,245,734 38 


1,079 804 46 


3,576,747 24 


1,048 00 


10.985 34 


1,413 86 


13.447 20 


2,086 55 


30.000 00 


3.774 26 


35,860 81 


1,214 25 


15,200 49 


2,643 22 


19,057 96 


1,672 30 


30.293 31 


2.205 70 


34,171 31 


6,855 40 


110,206 15 


27,296 55 


146,358 10 


2,329 60 


27.680 00 


2,005 86 


32,015 46 


* 6.489 70 


95730 84 


2,497 62 


104,718 16 


4,572 95 


I5t1 g-70 on 


17,118 46 


143,670 41 


1,179 00 


13,679 00 


1,008 75 


15.866 75 


1,652 00 


r>n 470 10 


823 72 


22,945 P2 


1,682 65 


it; dm oo 


4,510 69 


21.T93 34 


25,845 80 


^QQ £7? 00 


35.129 60 


660.647 40 


1,555 00 


OS POO 00 


462 49 


27.817 49 


1,377 00 


15.336 56 


2,228 30 


18.941 86 


59,560 20 


1,134,032 79 


103,119 08 


1,296,712 07 



(*) Including grant of $1,500 in re Normal School. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



17 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

Financial Statement. 









Expenditure. 














Libraries, maps, 


Rent and repairs, 


Total expenditure 


Balances. 


Teach 


Sites and building 


apparatus, prizes 
and school books. 


fuel and 


for all Public 








school houses. 


other expenses. 


School purposes. 






$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c- 


1 


23,916 32 


1,966 71 


1,056 87 


9,649 04 


36,588 94 


17,396 93 


2 


72,563 83 


9,036 45 


1,377 69 


22,403 74 


105,381 71 


30,227 72 


3 


44,816 92 


4,112 67 


2,142 23 


12,352 66 


63,424 48 


11,641 63 


4 


31,504 74 


4,223 89 


545 26 


14,096 54 


50,370 43 


11,750 43 


5 


33,084 19 


11,061 41 


308 38 


9,930 18 


54,384 16 


7,470 33 


6 


'36,264 35 


1,819 40 


1,083 08 


9,397 91 


48,564 74 


15,434 24 


7 


42,784 90 


2,257 21 


1,579 94 


13,527 91 


60,149 96 


26,269 10 


8 


40,867 80 


7,844 17 


996 n 


13,948 36 


63,657 44 


19,476 11 


9 


35,151 05 


2,836 91 


770 54 


8,719 35 


47,477 85 


12,310 56 


10 


22,799 73 


1,684 83 


1,124 65 


5,972 86 


31,532 07 


7,865 91 


11 


79,092 06 


6,417 67 


2,128 16 


2,6,147 35 


113,785 24 


24,311 09 


12 


29,389 57 


456 09 


1,095 79 


8,772 25 


39,713 70 


15,325 76 


13 


30,907 05 


1,965 15 


760 81 


10,023 64 


43,656 65 


7,613 73 


14 


25,565 15 


1,133 35 


361 87 


10,622 14 


37,682 51 


8,339 24 


15 


58,588 73 


7,322 25 


1,149 41 


14,923 35 


81,983 74 


23,840 13 


16 


74,161 15 


7,845 49 


757 38 


21,342 69 


104,106 71 


28,661 15 
44,230 83 


17 


51,611 49 


7,329 41 


1,299 70 


19 247 94 


79,488 54 


as 


64,930 80 


9,494 22 


1,001 79 


20,843 34 


96,270 15 


27,064 17 


19 


32,930 32 


1,447 51 


418 02 


7,772 07 


42,567 98 


12,858 05 


20 


69,994 44 


3,630 07 


1,470 43 


19,740 24 


94,835 18 


22,095 78 


21 


31,930 63 


1,660 62 


470 78 


8,754 10 


42,816 13 


11,118 60 


22 


27,385 34 


2,056 03 


418 96 


8,887 04 


38,747 37 


14,386 75 


23 


67,423 83 


7,878 29 


1,160 74 


22,088 50 


98,551 36 


36,563 44 


24 


36,834 31 


650 95 


464 81 


9,143 29 


47,093 36 


24.852 20 


25 


40,417 56 


3,488 70 


1,135 12 


11,660 66 


56,702 04 


17,884 88 


26 


44,709 10 


5,322 41 


2,079 59 


17,416 36 


69,527 46 


19,235 07 


27 


49,713 98 


1,229 72 


977 00 


16,018 28 


67,938 98 


36,563 73 


28 


29,512 79 


2,442 38 


657 23 


10,920 54 


*43,532 94 


11,348 31 


29 


40,809 96 


6,792 43 


1,448 96 


16,638 87 


65,690 22 


20.f33 79 


30 


33,280 99 


4,365 59 


879 57 


8,838 84 


47,364 99 


9.738 20 


31 


29,111 91 


3,212 57 


352 29 


7,951 69 


40,628 46 


13.825 86 


32 


24,694 17 


431 38 


326 15 


5,467 82 


30,919 52 


8.208 17 


33 


41,555 54 


7,571 72 


871 07 


10,685 52 


60,683 85 


10.441 29 


34 


97,078 32 


7,543 73 


2,088 91 


25,436 78 


132,147 74 


41,910 22 


35 


25,533 29 


2,865 69 


848 90 


5,648 76 


34,896 64 


4,735 38 


36 


45,673 08 


4,541 35 


1,978 23 


14,627 66 


66,820 32 


13.553 20 


37 


41,594 *9 


1,657 45 


489 83 


12,858 92 


56,600 49 


41.021 77 


38 


33,364 93 


3,293 07 


515 22 


10,341 37 


47,514 59 


18.730 41 


39 


57,094 10 


3,866 62 


779 10 


20,366 16 


82,105 93 


26.R16 52 


40 


32,928 85 


4,531 35 


658 65 


10,034 62 


48*047 43 


23.737 83 


41 


74,609 13 


10,371 31 


1,347 43 


30,552 55 


116,880 42 


44.370 05 


42 


12,632 9 


3,101 77 


483 14 


5,895 98 


22,113 78 


?.P54 75 


43 


38,406 98 


6,134 92 


1,283 15 


13,557 02 


59.382 07 


14.420 04 


44 


32,590 76 


7,989 59 


1,079 14 


10,816 08 


52,475 57 


10,660 06 


45 


150 00 








150 00 






1,889,961 32 


196,728 76 


44.222 78 


594,040 97 


2,724,953 83 


851,793 41. 


1 


9,208 53 






3,795 54 


13,004 07 


443 13 


2 


22,017 15 


181 "81 " * 


1*784 'l2 ' 


11,877 73 


35,860 81 




3 


12,030 07 
14,179 14 




66 90 


6,905 86 
5,297 83 


19,002 83 
33,494 33 


55 13 
676 98 


4 


" 13,878 '75" 


138 61 


5 


81,905 60 


15,859 56 


5,911 55 


42,462 09 


146,138 80 


2 1 9 *0 


6 


21,197 15 
66,070 69 

68,828 35 




87 01 


10,731 30 
30,662 91 
29,494 42 


32,015 46 

104,718 16 
124,357 9^ 




7 


"*7,'984 56* 

20,228 94 




8 


5,806*24' 


19,312 45 


9 


10.610 68 






5,256 07 


15.866 75 




10 

1 1 


17,130 77 

12.396 95 
406,791 32 




"15*56' 


4,884 50 

6,219 10 

194,078 11 


22,030 87 

21,193 34 

640.189 9° 


914 95 


1,124 65 : " 

38,800 30 


1,452 64 
520 25 


12 


20,457 42 


13 


18,168 62 
12,317 50 


1,004 38 


127 26 

1,041 00 


8,517 23 
4,867 43 


27,817 4Q 
18.225 93 




14 


" " 71 5 93 








772,852 52 


99,062 95 


16,951 08 


365,050 22 


1,253,915 77 


42,795 30. 



18 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 

V.— Table E — 



Towns. 



1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg . . 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Barri* 

9 Berlin 

10 Blenheim 

11 Bothwell 

12 Bowmanville . . 

13 Bracebridge . . . 

14 Brampton .... 

15 Brockville .... 

16 Bruce Mines . . 

17 Cache Bay 

18 Carleton Place 

19 Clinton 

20 Cobourg 

21 Collingwood . . . 

22 Copper Clifl . . . 

23 Cornwall 

24 I)e3eronto .... 

25 Dresden 

26 Dundas 

27 Dunnville 

28 Dui-ham 

29 East Toronto . 

30 Essex 

31 Forest 

32 Fort Frances . . 

33 Fort William . 

34 Gait 

35 Gananoque 

36 Goderich 

37 Gore Bay .... 

38 Gravenhurst . . . 

39 Harriston .... 

40 Hawkesbury . . 

41 Hespeler 

42 Huntsville 

43 Ingersoll 

44 Kincardine 

45 Kingsville .... 

46 Leamington . . . 

47 Lindsay 

48 Listowel 

49 Little Current 

50 Mattawa 

51 Meaford 

52 Midland 

53 Milton 

54 Mitchell 

55 Mount Forest . 

56 Napanee 

57 New Liskeard 

58 Newmarket . . . 

59 Niagara 

60 Niagara Falls 

61 North Bay . . . 

62 North Toronto 

63 Oakville 

64 Orangeville . . . 

65 Orillia 

66 Oshawa 

67 Owen Sound . . 

68 Palmerston . . . 

69 Paris 

70 Parkhill .... . 



Receipts. 



Legislative 


grant 




a 


c. 


65 00 


358 00 


283 


00 


335 00 


286 


00 


195 00 


297 90 


785 


00 


1,388 


60 


305 00 


202 


00 


343 00 


1,011 


00 


479 00 


964 00 


300 


00 


100 


00 


504 00 


437 0u 


412 


35 


796 


00 


373 


03 


492 


00 


404 


00 


295 


00 


306 


00 


270 


00 


545 00 


2*3 


00 


172 


00 


343 00 


74 00 


451. 


no 


968 


85 


601 


00 


591 


00 


510 


00 


260 00 


216 


00 


33 00 


348 80 


471. 


00 


674 


05 


429 00 


253 


00 


324 


00 


811 


on 


325 


no 


148 


no 


39 00 


382 00 


471 


00 


511 


00 


381 


00 


396 


00 


498 


00 


110 


00 


406 00 


148 00 


541 00 


232 


00 


3n4 


no 


186 00 


605 00 


506 00 


491 


00 


1 .255 


eo 


322 00 


333 


00 


146 


00 



773 22 
1,888 00 
3,777 47 
5,632 28 

6,579 38 
2,575 00 
4,664 26 

10,468 *0 

22,399 76 
3,695 89 
1,613 00 
4,500 00 
4,225 00 
5,825 00 

14,700 00 
1,503 00 
1,«078 91 
5,800 00 
2,900 00 
6,600 00 

10,704 00 
3,129 06 
6,150 00 
5,300 00 
2,475 00 
5,112 67 
2,350 00 
2,798 60 
4,924 66 
2,092 18 
2,850 00 
2,325 00 
7,049 00 

14,000 00 
S.078 02 
5,225 85 
1,780 00 
3.794 44 
2.534 00 
2,500 00 
4,230 76 
3.500 00 
5,900 00 
2,982 00 
3.357 82 
3.791 00 

10,948 86 
3.774 00 
1,502 00 
1,181 7 2 
3,193 00 
6,071 00 
2,776 79 
2,969 00 
3,649 00 
6,150 00 
2,360 01 
2,475 00 

2.nn5 74 

15,088 45 
fi.313 00 
4,950 72 
3,629 25 
6,450 00 

14.800 00 
6,612 00 

14,930 00 
3.250 uO 
4,800 00 
2.225 00 



Clergy Reserve 

fund, balances 

and other 



8 c 

851 37 

704 39 

667 32 

278 25 

1,525 46 

763 51 

56 80 

377 49 

769 88 

799 45 

522 82 

135 10 

710 19 

1,064 30 

1,3/4 85 

103 74 

1,970 45 

258 58 

791 50 

45 60 

321 77 

1,409 55 

3,865 52 

346 43 

584 91 

190 75 

252 26 

1,163 07 

541 48 

14 93 
457 40 
591 10 
828 14 

15 27 
1,211 23 



111 56 
106 78 
178 64 
209 16 
9,800 06 

171 73 
781 66 
680 90 

2,950 74 

4,911 86 

2,183 23 

88 97 

835 12 

61 24 

211 23 

257 37 

653 93 

241 68 

292 20 

172 73 
120 13 
975 32 
171 26 
119 95 
699 05 

57 56 
49 00 
200 71 
979 44 
509 20 
522 72 
260 82 
775 55 
86 53 



Total receipts 
for all Public 
School pur- 
poses. 



1,689 59 
2,950 39 
4,727 79 
6,245 53 
8,390 84 
3,533 51 
5,018 96 

11.630 89 

24,558 2* 
4,800 34 
2,337 82 
4,978 10 
5,946 19 
7.368 30 

17,038 £5 
1.906 74 
5,149 36 
6,562 58 
4,128 50 
7,057 95 

11,821 77 
4,911 61 

10,507 52 
6,050 43 

3.354 91 
5,609 42 
2,872 26 
4,506 b7 
5,699 14 
2,279 11 
3.650 40 
2,990 10 
8,328 14 

14,984 12 
6,890 25 
5,816 85 
2,401 86 
4,161 22 
2,978 64 
2.742 16 

14,379 62 
4,142 73 

7.355 71 
4,091 90 
6,561 56 
9.026 86 

13,948 09 
4,188 97 
2,485 12 
1,281 56 
3,786 23 
6,799 37 
3.941 72 
3,594 68 
4,337 26 
6,820 73 
2,590 14 
3,855 32 
2,325 00 

15.749 40 
7,244 05 
5,312 28 
3.364 25 
7,255 71 

16,285 44 
7,612 20 

16,708 32 
3.832 82 
5,908 35 
2.457 53 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



19 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
Financial Statement. — Continued. 



Expenditure. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2,6 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
,33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
6tf 
69 
70 



Teachers' 
salaries. 



Sites and building 
school houses. 



715 00 

2,127 30 

3,587 06 

2,582 15 

3,471 50 

2,139 07 

3,163 32 

8,245 92 

11,973 89 

2,827 00 

1,644 17 

4,171 07 

4,532 72 

3,722 43 

8,957 01 

1,470 00 

650 00 

4,625 00 

2,982 00 

4,489 03 

8*415 24 

2,688 00 

4,797 92 

4,619 35 

2,730 95 

4,165 63 

2,402 74 

2,936 82 

4,034 50 

1,885 00 

2,429 00 

1,427 37 

5,033 97 

11,061 07 

4.637 74 

4,443 69 

1,606 25 

3,068 51 

1,890 00 

1,227 33 

3,338 50 

2.906 83 
5,230 00 
2,750 05 ' 
2,756 45 
3,128 85 
9,014 02 
3,064 08 
1,295 50 

905 23 
2,880 00 
5,255 88 

2.907 50 
2,725 00 
3,041 50 
4,333 30 
1,013 46 
2,520 00 
1,600 00 
5,338 75 
2,480 44 

3,407 29, 
1,265 ,00 
3,950 48 
6,963 30 
5(,621 19 
U.815 00 
9,629 70 
3,872 50 
1,696 25 

5 E. 



c. 
5 60 



349 82 

573 00 

6,338 70 

353 63 



Libraries, maps, 

apparatus, prizes 

and school books, 



62 85 
290 40 
422 25 



2 75 

1,779 67 

426 77 



146 71 

241 27 

180 93 

3,589 63 



891 44 



397 47 



152 79 

500 00 

9,664; 79 

229 25 



77 66 
4,553 90 



336 54 
277 37 



592 84 



7,720 62 
592 50 



60 75 



652 75 
157 27 



14 37 



25 73 

46 27 

73 ?5 

770 73 



58 52 
180 00 



24 22 
14 50 

14 40 



49 65 



46 54 



Rent and repairs 

fuel and other 

expenses. 



52 54 

140 31 

6 00 



233 47 

351 99 

25 55 



24 08 



68 95 
51 45 



70 25 



52 15 

198 33 

15 CO 

35 35 



127 47 



79 55 
47 72 
18 20 

354 15 



20 00 
39 65 
69 13 

118 00 
67 50 
35 15 

349 36 
74 94 



32 40 
18 50 



838 86 
669 46 
1,140 73 
2j,178 80 
901 97 
574 02 
1,205 84 
2,531 44 
4,860 59 
1,149 77 
309 89 
624 04 
1,051 91 
2,995 74 
7,151 23 
410 66 
719 69 
1,453 76 
958 47 
2,392 28 
2,992 48 
1,481 11 
1,267 10 
1,201 59 
568 20 
1,297 38 
469 52 
623 44 
1,428 32 
344 49 
784 29 
826 20 
2,942 18 
3,862 14 
1,882 47 
1,373 16 
332 69 
1,004 45 
909 01 
476 60 
1,376 33 
835 25 
2,068 24 
1,159 04 
3,617 97 
1,208 06 
4,881 92 
800 32 
666 61 
258 47 
906 23 
1,039 12 
' 573 04 
445 78 
983 44 
2,394 03 
337 50 
868 61 
258 64 
2,219 40 
3,712 80 
1,595 66 
2,471 00 
2,873 48 
2,327 29 
1,263 32 
3,448 20 
1,034 62 
2,027 83 
591 77 



Total expenditure 

for;all Public 
School purposes. 



1,609 46 
2,796 76 
4,727 79 
4,775 32 
4,373 47 
2,738 87 
4,765 25 
11,423 61 
23,943 91 
4,330 40 
1,954 06 
4,857 96 
5,933 55 
7,320 42 
16,108 24 
1,883 41 
3,149 36 
6,529 75 
3,954 97 
7,042 42 
11,648 99 
4*399 69 
9,654 55 
5,820 94 
3,345 69 
5,463 01 
2,872 26 
4,^04 22 
5,603 13 
2.235 49 
3,213 29 
2,884 51 
8,328 14 
14,948 76 
6,520 .6J. 

5.816 85 
1,938 94 
4,097 04 
2,951 80 
2,203 93 

14,379 62 
4,040 23 
7,349 69 
3,909 09 
6,522 33 
8,890 81 

13,948 09 
4,063 23 
1,977 11 
1,199 55 
3,786 23 
6,422 47 

3.817 08 
3,527 70 
4,072 66 
6,745 53 
2,297 95 
3,388 61 
1,878 64 

15 318 42 
6,854 87 
5,120 95 
3,864 25 
6,859 11 
9,639 95 
7,612 20 

15,420 47 
3,696 72 
5,900 33 
2,306 52 



Balances. 



1 


c. 


80 


13 


153 53 


1,470 


?1 


4,017 37 


794 64 


253 


71 


207 28 


614 


33 


469 


94 


583 76 


120 


14 


12 


64 


47 88 


930 


61 


23 


$5 


32 


83 


173 


53 


15 


53 


172 


78 


511 


92 


852 


87 


229 


49 


9 22 


146 


4 


2 


45 


96 


01 


43 62 


437 


11 


105 


59 



35 36 
370 04 


462 62 
64 18 
26 84 

538 23 



102 45 

G 02 

182 81 

39 23 



15b 


Ut> 


125 74 


508 01 


82 


01 


376 


90 


124 


64 


66 


98 


264 54 


75 


20 


992 


19 


467 


?1 


446 


36 


430 


98 


389 


18 


191 


33 


3% 


60 


6,645 49 


1,287 


95 



136 10 
8 02 

151 01 



20 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. i2 



THE PUBLIC 
V.— Table E.— 



Towns. 



Totals. 



1 Counties, 

2 Cities . . 

3 Towns . . 



etc 



4 Grand Totals 

5 do do 



1903 
1902 



6 Increases 

7 Decreases 



8 Percentages 



Receipts. 



Legislative 
grants. 



71 Parry Sound 

72 Pembroke 

73*Penetanguishene . 

74 Perth 

75 Peterborough 

76 Petrolea 

77 Picton 

78 Port Arthur 

79 Port Hope 

80 Prescott 

81 Preston 

82 Rat Portage 

83 Renfrew 

84 Ridgetown 

85 St. Marys 

86 Sandwich 

87 Sarnia 

88 Sault Ste. Marie 

89 Seaforth 

90 Simcoe 

91 Smith's Palls 

92 Stayner 

93 Strathroy 

94 Sturgeon Falls . . 

95 Sudbury . 

96 Thessalon 

97 Thornbury 

98 Thorold 

99 Tillsonburg 

100 Toronto Junction 

101 Trenton 

102 Uxbridge 

103 Vankleek Hill . . 

104 Walkerton 

105 Walkerville 

106 Wallaceburg 

107 Waterloo 

108 Welland 

109 Whitby 

110 Wiarton 

111 Wingham 

Totals 



,058 00 
334 00 

393 00 
457 00 

,141 50 
480 00 
583 00 
296 00 
653 00 
436 00 
260 10 
718 00 
385 00 
277 00 
418 00 
72 00 
,010 00 
871 00 
206 00 
533 65 
743 00 
342 00 
508 00 
132 00 
109 00 
191 00 
118 00 
184 00 
289 20 
,075 05 
376 00 
208 00 
283 00 
400 00 
230 00 
504 00 
375 00 
380 00 

394 00 
280 CO 
459 00 



Municipal 
grants and 

assessments. 



Clergy Reserve 
fund, balances 
and other 



47,195 65 



251,208 40 
59.560 20 
47,195 65 



357,964 25 
353,194 39 



4,769 86 



6.4 



I c. 
6,110 50 
4,759 00 
3,796 14 
3,859 09 

17,500 00 
7.500 0C 
5,150 00 

5,155 00 
6,350 00 
3,725 00 
3,600 00 

10,116 74 
5,595 05 

3.198 23 
7,194 85 
1,250 00 

13,050 60 

12.693 00 
2,600 00 
4,712 15 
7,911 09 
1,400 00 
4,056 00' 
2,545 92 
1,800 CO 
1,859 CO 
1,206 04 
2,645 00 
3.909 95 

18,479 00 
4,554 73 
2,505 00 
2,110 25 
3,903 70 
5,000 00 
4,540 49 
6,691 08 
2.900 00 
4,400 00 
3,600 00 
4,122 02 



187 53 
454 19 

472 92 
831 91 

2,959 70 
461 71 

3,945 36 
831 57 
612 00 
319 23 

1,916 95 
199 85 
686 48 
339 06 

473 84 
1,419 49 
6,429 57 

856 87 
1,049 91 

172 '>5 

345 50 
1,281 12 

410 55 
72 74 

528 60 



577,340 99 



2,245,734 ?P 

1,134,032 79 

577,340 99 



3,957,108 16 
3,666,563 59 



290,544 57 



70.81 



302 77 
447 78 
163 02 

1,047 60 
625 36 
393 05 
814 72 
343 50 
208 '43 
97 50 
511 57 

1,765 97 
335 83 
152 74 
146 65 



90,615 53 



1,079,804 46 
103,119 08 
90,615 53 



1,273,539 07 
1,261,241 33 



12,297 74 



Total receipts 
for all Public 
School pur- 
poses. 



$ c. 
7,356 03 
5,547 19 
4,662 06 
5,148 00 

21,601 20 
8,440 71 
9,678 36 
6,282 57 
7,615 00 
4,480 25 
5,777 05 

11,034 59 
6,666 53 
3,814 29 
8,086 69 
2,741 49 

20,490 17 

14,420 87 
3,855 91 
5,418 45 
8,999 59 
3,023 J 2 
4,974 55 
2,750 66 

2.437 60 
2,050 00 
1,626 81 
3,276 78 
4.362 17 

20,601 65 
5,555 69 
3,106 05 
3,207 97 
4.647 20 

5.438 43 
5.141 99 
7.577 65 
R 045 97 
5,129 83 
4.032 74 
4,727 67 



22.79 



715.152 17 



3.576.747 01 

1,W 719 07 

715,->52 17 



5.588,611 48 
5,280,999 31 



307,612 1' 



Cost per pupil : Counties, etc., $9.95 ; Cities, $18.96: ; Towns, $10.68; Province, $11.54. 



5a E. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



21 



SCHOOLS —Concluded. 
Financial Statement. — Concluded. 



71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 



Expenditure. 



Teachers' 

salaries. 



$ c. 
4,687 68 
3,953 30 
3,326 46 
3,471 50 
14,265 15 
5i825 00 
4,752 14 
4,062 17 
5,585 00 
3,126 16 
3,124 87 
6,878 71 
3,437 00 
2,887 52 
3,576 00 
850 00 
8,824 88 
8,148 76 
2,227 62 
4,480 07 
6,619 50 
1,975 28 
4,044 00 
1,583 15 
1,885 00 
1,555 00 
1,325 00 
2,165 84 
3,176 50 
12,678 25 
3,322 08 
2,453 17 
1,920 00 
3,511 81 
3,393 38 
3,445 85 
5,052 78 
2,195 74 
3,700 00 
2,980 00 
3,567 43 



433,318 52 



1 1,889,961 32 

2 772,852 52 

3 433,318 52 



Sites, and building 
school houses.j 



4 3,096,132 36 

5 2,987,932 88 



108,199 48 



66.53 



Libraries, maps, 
apparatus, prizes 
and school books. 



258 50 



4 00 

278 45 



528 25 

4,746 00 



135 00 



1,000 00 
' '665 25 



40 68 
191 "27* 



52,163 32 



196,728 76 
99,062 95 
52,163 32 



347,955 03 
331,842 08 



16,112 95 



77 56 

2 50 

33 25 



129 74 



10 00 

129 46 

29 95 

76 33 



29 00 



29 22 

427 11 



75 91 
287 66 



11 35 

32 60 
15 10 

33 64 



200 00 



25 10 
291 40 

64 19 
184 03 

27 00 



23 73 



6,341 70 



44,222 78 

16,951 08 

6,341 70 



67,515 56 
80,565 47 



Rent and repairs,^ Total expenditure 
fuel and other. . for all Public 



13,049 91 



7.48 



1.45 



expenses. 



School purposes. 



$ c. 


$ c. 


2,581 37 


7,346 61 


1,591 39 


5,547 19 


760 60 


4,378 81 


1,613 3 


5,085 <3 


7,336 05 


21,601 20 


2,615 71 


8,440 71 


1,496 66 


6,382 54 


1,814 74 


6,155 36 


2,030 00 


7,615 00 


1,293 09 


4,429 25 


1,072 83 


4,327 16 


3,825 93 


10,734 59 


2,490 01 


6,531 59 


873 83 


3,761 35 


1,609 44 


7,908 44 


652; 47 


1,502 47 


6,341 25 


19,941 35 


5,617 48 


14,193 35 


726 35 


2,953 97 


491 2) 


4,971 36 


2,307 99 


8,999 40 


565 00 


2,827 94 


925 77 


4,969 77 


994 18 


2,712 33 


432 95 


2,317 95 


441 41 


2,007 76 


267 67 


1,625 27 


1,075 97 


3,256 91 


1,142 36 


4,352 50 


6,625 77 


20,304 02 


1,217 80 


4,739 88 


423 63 


2,876 80 


492 05 


3,077 30 


1,036 30 


4,573 21 


1,729 97 


5,414 75 


1,594 51 


5,104 55 


2,224 34 


7,461 15 


728 36 


2,991 76 


1,429 83 


5,129 83 


74£ 09 


3,920 36 


1,136 51 


4,727 67 



182,856 20 



594,040 97 
365,050 22 
182,856 20 



1,141,947 39 
989,378 68 



152,568 71 



674,679 74 



2,724,953 83 

1,253,916 77 

674,679 74 



Balances. 



$ c.~" 
9 47 


283 25 
62 67 




3,295 
127 


82 

21 



4,653,550 34 
4,389,719 11 



50 98 

1,449 39 

300 00 

134 94 

52 94 

178 25 

1,239 02 

548 3" 

227 52 

90i 94 

447 09 

19 

195 18 

4 73 

33 33 

119 65 

42 24 

1 54 

19 87 

9 67 

297 63 

815 81 

229 25 

130 67 

73 99 

23 f-8 

37 44 

116 50 

2,054 19 • 



112 38 



40,472 43 



851,793 41 
42,795 30 
40,472 43 



935,061 14 
891,280 20 



263,831 23 



43,780 94 



24.54 



* Including Protestant Separate School. 



22 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I —Table F.— Financial 



Counties, 

(including incorporated villages but 
not cities or towns,) etc. 



Receipts. 



1 Bruce *- 

2 Carleton 

3 Essex 

4 Frontenac 

5 Grey 

6 Hastings 

7 Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds and Grenville 

12 Lennox and Addington .. 

13 Lincoln 

14 Middlesex 

15 Norfolk 

16 Northumberland 

17 Ontario 

18 Peel 

19 Perth 

20 Peterborough ••• 

21 Prescott and Russell •••• 

22 Renfrew 

23 Simcoe • •• 

24 Stormont, Dundas and 

Garry 

25 Waterlc") 

26 Wellington 

27 Wentworth 

28 York 

29 Districts 



Expendi- 



Glen 



Totals 



Cities. 



1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham 

4 Guelnh 

5 Hamilton 

6 Kingston 

7 London 

8 Ottawa 

9 St. Catharines 

10 St. Thomas .... 

11 Stratford 

12 Toronto 

13 Windsor 

14 Woodstock 



Totals 



267 



433 00 
1,086 00 
1,488 00 
555 00 
249 60 
277 00 
213 00 
327 00 

57 00 
147 00 
324 00 
117 00 

91 00 
174 00 

48 00 
224 00 

65 00 

63 00 
142 00 

20 00 

2,943 00 

1,133 00 

272 00 

896 00 

286 00 

232 00 

46 00 

41 00 

1,925 00 



5,678 09 

7,547 55 

10,866 20 

3,448 96 

2,070 18 

1,789 09 

3,835 52 

3,684 12 

571 45 

728 40 

1,304 56 

496 08 

938 40 

1,805 _ 

376 67 

2,001 72 

205 33 

137 18 

2,070 12 

325 38 

25,150 74 

3,366 05 

1,298 



39 



86 



13,874 60 



276 00 
232 00 
197 00 
230 00 

1,089 00 
448 
647 00 

4,010 00 
274 00 
170 00 
236 00 

3,679 001 

344 00! 

69 00! 



3,861 70 
4,630 71 
3,570 89 

131 ' 

534 
5,834 



2,788 01 

5,300 67 

9,086 83 

1,311 54 

825 04 

484 78 

882 48 

1,952 34 

251 02 

114 

246 16 

102 57 

459 48 

1,102 35 

257 24 

908 04 

742 81 

41 65 

1,175 13 

24 50 

12,225 97 

3,095 08 

216 86 

1,526 52 
2,259 85 
1,076 " 
72 00 
239 75 
3,249 98 



8,899 
13,934 
21,441 
5,315 
3,144 
2,550 87 
4,931 00 
5,963 46 

879 47 

990 15 
1,874 72 

715 65 
1,488 88 
3,082 18 

681 91 
3,133 76 
1,013 14 

241 83 
3,387 25 

369 88 
40,319 71 
7,594 



13 



1,787 25 

6,284 22 

7,176 56 

4,879 77 

249 00 

814 76 

11,009 24 



2,012 71 
2,038 80 
1,942 16 
2,940 04 

11,000 00 
3,383 59 
8,057 71 

45,175 
4,090 39 
1,287 41 
2,362 



70 



47,554 91 



466 
531 



1,175 04 
1,498 53 





358 


50 




269 


bO 


2 


,452 


14 


7 


,912 


92 


3 


,488 


4o 





,348 


05 




244 


8 V 




36 


7 6 



3,740 00 

5,736 78 

10,316 03 

3,038 50 

1,815 00 

1,756 50 

2,610 25 

3,327 02 

540 00 

723 00 

1,375 30 

550 00 

800 00 

1,640 00 

325 00 

1, 



720 83 



220 . 
1,852 50 

261 37 

20,188 51 

3,401 05 

1,245 00 



2,993 00 
2,875 00 
2,365 70 
225 00 
495 00 
6,139 37 



98,258 58 52,020 28 164,153 46 82,914 46 



698 73 



11,095 
670 
275 



3,463 75 
3,769 33 

2,497 

3,439 

14,541 14 

11,744 51 

12,193 16 

59,533 05 

4,609 26 

1,494 17 

3,297 43 

62,329 46 

6,481 86 

875 00 



1,955 00 
1,100 00 
1,200 00 
1,900 00 
6,228 35 
4,615 94 
3,400 00 

26,300 
2,006 
1,000 
1,300 

23,200 

5,428 

675 



11,901 00!l37,843 29 



40,525 03 190,269 32 



80,309 17 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



23 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 
Statement, Teachers, etc. 










Teachers 




i 








R 






o5 










4=1 






a 


03 






>» 








H 








ce 


O 






i 


Sh 






<D 


o> 






be 


42 






03 


a 


a> 


a 




3 


oj 




k 


K 


% 


h 


<j 



less 

< 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


$ i 

1,678 83 

4,712 60 

3,994 83 

743 52 

71 70 

129 00 

223 13 

424 57 

140 45 

2 40 

21 90 

60 50 

343 00 

733 03 


$ ' 

2 52 

319 15 

657 36 

2 50 

59 25 

37 30 

32 05 

53 00 


% t 

2,004 47 

2,230 17 

4,404 15 

847 24 

354 04 

230 11 

769 87 

957 13 

71 65 

88 75 
443 86 

89 87 
240 47 
392 33 

74 40 

989 90 

148 89 

21 83 

571 40 

99 33 

4,386 37 

1,039 96 

184 78 

901 75 
788 30 

1,034 29 

24 00 

317 35 

2,100 46 


$ c 

7,425 82 
12,998 70 
19,372 37 
4,631 76 
2,299 99 
2,152 91 
3,635 30 
4,761 72 

752 10 

814 15 
1,843 84 

700 37 
1,384 67 
2,855 34 

399 40 
2,744 27 

872 15 

, 241 83 

2,668 90 

365 35 

30,906 35 

5,262 38 

1,519 13 

5,012 21 
3,921 53 
3,630 94 
249 00 
812 35 
9,771 22 


% 4 

1,473 28 
935 52 

2,068 66 
683 74 
844 83 
397 96 

1,295 70 

1,201 74 
127 37 
176 00 
30 88 
15 28 
104 21 
226 84 
282 51 
389 49 
140 99 


16 

28 

40 

12 

7 

7 

9 

11 

2 

3 

8 

2 

4 

6 

1 

7 

1 

1 

7 

1 

93 

15 

5 

14 
12 
10 
1 
2 
25 


4 
1 
7 

2 

2 

2 

"i 
i 

9 

1 
1 

2 
2 

4 


12 

27 
33 
10 
7 
7 
7 
9 
2 
3 
8 
2 
4 
6 
1 
6 
1 
1 
6 
1 
84 
14 
4 

12 
10 
10 

1 

2 

21 


% 

193 

052 
004 
232 

'"653 

524 

**225 

3i5 

'"272 
295 
425 

315 
345 

"*344 


189 

206 
239 
244 
259 
254 
277 
274 
270 


10 




257 


11 
1?, 


2 78 


195 

275 


13 
14 
15 


1 20 
89 98 


200 
272 
325 


16 

17. 


36 62 


79 00 
2 43 


253 

250 


18.. 


220 


19 
20 


240 00 

4 65 

5,975 02 

739 31 

24 95 

1,033 20 
246 48 
218 25 


5 00 


718 35 

4 53 

9,413 36 

2,331 75 

268 12 

1,272 01 
3,255 03 
1,248 83 
... . 


293 

260 


21 
22 
23 

24 
25 
26 

27. 


356 45 
82 06 
64 40 

84 26 

11 75 

12 70 


223 
225 
194 

236 

220 
239 
225 


28... 




2 41 
1,238 02 


247 


29 


1,266 50 


264 89 


273 


1 


23,064 44 

15 58 

360 11 

29 25 

60 00 

2,985 46 

838 35 

3,575 10 

10,279 00 

1,348 06 


2,220 03 


25,807 12 

1,392 66 

2,150 19 

1,094 32 

1,231 60 

3,846 04 

6,166 11 

4,524 97 

22,181 23 

1,252 08 

478 10 

856 98 

20,083 25 

300 83 

200 00 


134,006 05 

3,363 24 

3,610 30 

2,334 22 

3,391 60 

14,191 87 

11,620 40 

11,700 07 

58,940 23 

4,606 82 

1,478 10 

2,907 08 

59,381 82 

6,481 86 

875 00 


30,147 41 

100 51 
159 03 
163 44 

47 94 
349 27 
124 11 
493 09 
592 82 
2 44 

16 07 

390 35 

2,947 64 

• • ; 


350 

6 

5 

6 

8 

37 

13 

• 19 

104 

-9 

5 

6 

103 

13 

2 


39 

1 

i 



20 
1 

26 


311 

6 
8 
37 
12 
19 
84 

I 

6 
77 
13 

2 


334 

600 

"766 

"'457 
600 



'"323 

...... 


234 
200 


?, 




220 


3 
4 
5 
6 


10 65 

200 00 

1,132 02 


200 

. 237 

180 

229 


7 
8 
9 


200 00 
180 00 


200 
216 
180 


10 




200 


11 

12 
13 
14. 


500 00 

14,135 52 

735 00 


250 10 

1,963 05 

17 83 


217 
200 
417 
337 







34,861 43 3,953 65 65,758 36 184,882 61 5,386 71 



49 



2871 



397 215 



24 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
L — Table F. — Financial Statement, 



Towns. 



Receipts. 






Expendi- 



1 Alexandria 

2 Almonte 

3 Amherstburg 

4 Arnprior 

5 Barrie 

6 Berlin 

7 Brockville 

8 Cobourg 

9 Cornwall 

10 Dundas 

11 Fort William ..... 

12 Gait 

13 Godcrich 

14 Hawkesbury 

15 Ingersoll 

16 Lindsay 

17 Mattawa 

18 Newmarket 

19 Niagara Falls 

20 North Bay 

21 Oakville 

22 Orillia 

23 Oshawa 

?4 Owen Sound 

25 Paris 

26 Parkhill : 

27 Pembroke 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Picton 

3 1 Port Arthur 

32 Prescott 

33 Preston 

34 Rat Portage 

35 Renfrew 

36 St. Mary's 

37 Sandwich 

38 Sarnia 

39 Sault Ste. Marie 

40 Seaforth 

^1 Sturgeon Falls .. 

42 Surbury 

43 Thorold 

44 Trenton 

45 Vankleekhill 

46 Walkerton 

47 Wallaceburg 

48 Waterloo 

49 Whitby ' 



Totals 



Totals. 



** Counties, etc 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 



151 00 
97 00 
225 00 
178 00 
112 00 
290 00 
261 00 
157 00 
422 00 
86 00 
136 00 

57 00 
53 00 

227 00 

58 00 
184 00 
183 00 

36 00 
104 00 
123 00 

22 00 
127 00 

59 00 
76 00 
45 00 
27 00 



59 



299 00 

142 00 

420 00 

40 00 

107 00 

120 00 
56 00 

109 00 

166 00 

45 00 

112 00 

121 00 
180 00 

56 00 

144 00 

138 00 

86 00 

129 00 

149 00 

121 00 

77 00 

72 00 

31 00 



2,083 55 
1,068 47 

3.026 45 
2,217 84 
1,361 85 
2,832 25 
2,460 00 
1,000 00 
4,450 00 
1,624 32 
1,007 75 

592 53 

462 30 
3,318 00 

851 44 
2,365 63 

315 00 

261 47 

804 38 
1,654 00 

225 
1,543 

422 
1,041 

443 

346 

3.027 05 
955 54 

5,667 60 

500 99 

1,200 

1,142 



$ 


c 


536 


34 


359 


31 


254 


3 


790 


73 


366 


94 


870 


5 :; 


167 


OS 


108 


13 


559 


58 


342 


68 


116 


90 


27 


85 


74 


78 


263 


21 


454 


5 8 



2,770 89 
1,524 78 
3,505 48i 
3,186 57 
2,840 79j 
3,992 78' 
2,888 08 
1,265 13 
6,431 58 
3,053 00 
2,260 65 

677 38! 

590 08 
3,545 



00 

27 

331 54 

00 

60 
07 
00 
00 
69 



6,416 00 



1,600 
1,987 

398 
1,350 
1,425 
3,582 

706 
1,313 15 
1,548 



11 



47 



700 00 

1,394 05 

869 00 

777 90 

1,266 45 

936 90 

222 64 



70,683 11 



267 13,874 60 98,258 58 
11,901 00 137,843 29 
59 6,416 00 70,683 11 



1,225 
148 57| 
375 55; 
273 58, 
116 00 

1,424 66 
248 10 
836 64 
580 63 
46 87 
488 23 
209 00 
145 91 
493 15 
,603 77 
721 65 
315 69 
657 59 

1,356 51 
280 25 

4,878 18 

488 81 

390 40 

11 45 

1,327 85 
672 25 
179 65 
568 69 
437 25 
154 55 
367 92 
298 79 
256 50 



40,873 17 



001 

,172 65 

,004 21| 

,723 86 

446 04 

,283 93 

,050 58 

363 00 

,095 08! 

729 22 

1,954 26 

1,069 24 

420 21 ! 

3,814 28 

1.306 54 
6,233 51j 
1,034 14| 

12,910 77: 
1,983 92! 

703 23| 
2,366 59! 
3,510 11! 

723 321 
6,340 18! 
2,034 81 
4,153 09, 

774 31| 
2,785 00: 
2,358 72, 

965 65 
2,091 74 
1,455 25 
1,053 45 
1,711 37 

1.307 69 
510 14 



1,700 00 

765 00 

1,200 00 

1,550 00 

900 00 

1,200 00 

1,800 00 

900 00 

3,149 50 

600 00 

900 00 

325 00 

400 00 

2,160 00 
575 

2,164 



117,972 28 




70 

1,221 88 
300 00 
600 00 

1,303 90 
250 00 

1,340 $5 
400 00 
500 00 
400 00 
300 00 

2,413 75 
800 00 

4,272 00 
450 00 

1,440 00 

1,167 39 
350 00 

1,552 00 

1,266 14 
35 00 
651 50 
800 00 

1,200 00 
508 50 
810 00 

1,100 00 
550 00 
700 00 

1,000 00 
600 00 
850 00 
600 00 
300 00 



50,637 11 



52,026 28 164.153 46 82,914 46 
40,525 03 190,269 32 80,309 17 
40,873 17,117,972 28 50,637 11 



4 Grand totals, 1903 

5 Grand totals, 1902 


412 32,191 60 306,784 98;133,418 48472,395 06 213,860 74 








6 Increases 

7 Decreases 


21 1,719 92 


13,436 53 




3,661 46 


28,264 38 


13,107 93 










8 Percentages 




6.81 


64.94 


28.24 


50.4 



*In incorporated villages included with Counties, etc., there were 44 teachers, all female. Note— Cost per pupil, 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



25 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
Teachers, etc.— Concluded. 



tura. 



•33 

.a o 



I! 






0T3 



3£ 

o » 



Teachers. 






55.5 S to 1 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7, 
8, 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13. 

14 

IB. 

16. 

17 

18. 

19. 

20 

21. 

22 

23. 

24 

25. 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30. 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35. 

36 

37 

38. 

39 

40. 

41. 

42. 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47. 

48 

49 



405 61 
37 00 
54 00 



8 00 
50 00 



238 42 




320 97 




655 10 


30 55 
38 32 




25 00 
1,606 88 


39 75 


850 68 
99 00 


15 05 



612 42 

672 78 

1,024 24 

858 59 

1,591 17 

1,787 93 

631 



2,726 03 



175 00 



7 00! 
10 00 
61 18 



31 55 



24 81 



14 00 



2 10 



228 80 



125 00 
30 SO 
13 00| 
23 29 

9* 50 
18 00 

1'84 



45 86 
289 23 ( 
268 34 

126 45 



96 33 



10,882 00 

12 60 

12 50 

136 00 



60 90 
5,015 70 



50 00 



2 45 



6 50 

596 50j 

17 501 

21 25 



48 20, 
i43"80; 



320 48, 

3,217 33! 
304 82! 
494 92 
223 53 
148 46 

1,200 00 
391 14; 
797 70| 
445 62 
63 54! 
480 80j 
332 38! 
100 00 
271 29' 
319 72 
168 05 
184 54| 
45 17 
930 98 
230 00 

1,738 73 
92 73 
585 52 
287 57! 
132 63 
539 07 

1,071 05 
152 65 
513 10 
620 00 

2,851 75 
265 81 

1,349 29 

1,254 72 
318 36 
503 97! 



1,524 

2,278 24 

2,647 01 

2,812 14 

3,673 58 

2,469 32 

1,220 48 

6,431 58 

2,511 70 

2,260 65 

647 53 

555 46 

3,545 00 

1,027 32 

2,962 40 

1,723 86 

363 54 

1,205 80 

2,050 58 

363 00 

1,637 53 

729 22 

914 85 

586 38 

391 03 

3,633 96 

1,298 34 

6,233 51 

542 73 

12,907 52 

1,467 56 

49 



44 86 



1,227 24 

539 56 

28 65 

319 20 

418 76 

44 65 



541 


30 


29 
34 


8 5 
6 2 


145 

41 


33 

81 


82 
78 


5 
13 




1,457 


55 



039 41 

482 86, 

29 18l 

180 32 

8 20 



229 52 



129 72 
150 58 



378 04> 

195 85 

346 72 

14 95| 



2,337 

563 55 
6,180 30 
1,420 00 
4,101 75 

774 31 
2,207 49 
2,354 72 

874 86 
1,944 27 
1,017 50 

999 29 
1,045 85 
1,076 44 

465 53 



491 41 
3 25 
516 36 
208 10 
137 07i 
,172 92 
159 77j 
159 88 
614 8T 
51 34 



22,935 74 



796 37 31,061 11105,430 33 



1 23,064 44 2,220 03 25,807 12 134,006 05 30,147 41 

2 34,861 43 3,953 65 65,758 36 184,882 61 5,386 71 

3 22,935 74 796 37 31,061 11105,430 33 12,541 95 



577 51 
4 00 

90 79 
147 47 
437 75 

54 16 
665 52 
231 25 

44 61 



12,541 95 



5 

6 

4 

8 

8 

4 
15 

3 

3 

1 

2 
12 

2 

7 

5 

1 

3 

4 

1 

4 

2 

II 

1 
10 

4 

2 

i 

i 

4! 

3 

4 

6! 

4 : 

2 

3 , 

1 




210 



10 



600 



675 




550 

700 



450 
460 



550 



200 



583 



243 
255 
240 
200 
225 
200 
225 
225 
234 
200 
360 
325 
200 
180 
287 
250 
225 
300 
200 
331 
250 
335 
200 
250 
200 
300 
211 
200 
263 
225 
309 
292 
350 
290 
235 
350 
200 
200 
300 
254 
287 
275 
200 
175 
167 
15© 
300 
167 



235 



350 .39 311 334 234 

336 49 287 397 215 
210 10 200 583 235 



4 80,861 61! 
5100,910 51 


6,970 05 122,626 59 424 
6,157 85 118,173 11 435 


318 99 
440 75 


48,076 07 
50,062 24 


896 

870 




98| 
94 


798 
776 


391 
366 


228 
224 


6 


812 20 4,453 48 . . . 






26 




4 


22 


25 


4 


7 20,048 90 . 


11 


121 76 


1,986 17 


















8 19.96 


1.64 28.9 .. . 








10 


.94 

! 


89.06 . 

i 















i 


j 





enrolled attendance ; Counties, etc., $7.50 ; Cities, $10.59 ; Towns, $8.93 ; Province, $9.01. 



26 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. — Table G. — Attendance, Pupils in the 



Counties, 

(including incorpor- 
ated villages but 
not cities or towns) , 
etc. 



C -' 



Reading. 



















S3 




CV( 














>d 


tJ 




oj 


M 


m 


T3 




o 










^ 


co 



1 Bruce 

2 Carleton 

3 Essex 

4 Frontenac 

5 Grey 

6 Hastings 

7 Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds & Qren.... 

12 Lennox & Add... 

13 Lincoln 

14 Middlesex 

15 Norfolk 

16 Northumberl'd - 

17 Ontario 

18 Peel 

19 Perth , 

20 Peterbo'gh 

21 Pres. & Russell.. 

22 Renfrew 

23 Simcoe 

24 Storm't, Dundas 

& Glengarry ... 

25 Waterloo 

26 Wellington 

27 Wentworth 

28 York 

29 Districts 

Totals 



Cities. 



1 Belleville 

2 Brantford ... 

3 Chatham 

4 Gueloh 

5 Hamilton ... 

6 Kingston 

7 London 

8 Ottawa 

9 St. Catharines 

10 St. Thomas ... 

11 Stratford ... 

12 Toronto 

13 Windsor 

14 Woodstock ... 

Totals ... 



835 
1,549 
2,261 1, 
4281 
269| 
270! 
422 
577 

71 
104 
196' 

89 
136| 
172 

77 
225 1 

9l! 

23 
288 

32' 

5,536 2, 

757! 

188 



799 

565 

437 

20 

79 

1,371 



445 

752 

,198 

211 

131 

136 

222 

312 

37 

57 

90 

45 

70 

94 

37 

114 

43 

12 

155 

15 

,720 

378 

101 

376 

305 

235 

H 

42 

708 



17,867 9,052 





377 


204 




320 


154 




360 


192 




367 


183 


1 


,644 


838 




805 


407 




780 


415 


5 


,9053 


,037 




328 


165 




240 


123 




351 


184 


5 


,085 2 


,625 




771 


401 




114 


56 



17,4478,984 



390 

797 

1,063 

217 

138 

134 

200 

265 

34 

471 

106^ 

44 

66 

78 

40 

111 

48! 

11 

133 

17 

2,816 

379 

87 1 

423 
260 

202S 

9 

37 

663 



563 
916 
1,265 
224' 
116 
127) 
197 
309 

34 

50| 
124 
' 46 

96 
101 

471 
140, 

53i 

13! 
155 

17| 

3,003 

406i 

118 



412 51 

328 58 

272 62 

5 25 

51 64 

585 42 



171 

473 

807 

98 

69 

76 

73 

248 

16 

34 

38 

21 

33 

17 

22 

64 

14 

2 

54 

5 

,646 

232 

61 

315 
131 

94 
2 

26 
784 



106 

318 

400 

51 

33 

45 

44 

77 

7 

16 

25 

6 

22 

30 

7 

31 

18 

1 

43 

7 

1,052 

109 

27 

154 

83 

59 

5 

13 

206 



250 

341 

419 

57 

60 

50 

85 

87 

11 

20 

25 

27 

21 

21 

14 

30 

18 

4 

59 

5 

880 

126 

38 

143 
157 
107 
5 
30 
217 



162 

252 

353 

95 

56 

44 

82 

65 

20 

11 

32 

11 

34 

39 

20 

50 

18 

10 

62 

6 

610 

136 

30 

100 

131 

78 

4 

8 

104 



144i 2 

155 10! 

270 12 

113 14 



47 
53 



116 22 
77[ 23 
15l 2 
23 . .. 
34 42 
22i 2 

26 ... 
55 10 
14 ... 
41 9 
17 6 

5 1 

67 3 

9 ... 

332 16 

93 61 

27 5 



81 

62 

92 

4 

2 
54 



835 
1,549 
2,261 
428 
269 
270 
422 
577 

71 
104 
196 

89 
136 
172 

77. 
225 

9l| 

23 
288 

32 

5,536 

757 ; 

188 

799 
565 
437! 

20 ! 

79 
1,371 



835 
1,549 
2,261 
428 
269 
270 
422 
577 

71 
104 
196 

89 
136 
172 

77 
225 

91 

23 
288 

32 

5,536 

757 

188 

799 

565 

437 

20 

79 

1,371 



8,815 9,773 54 6,626 2,995 3,307 2,623 2,050 266 17,867 17,867 



173 

166 
168 
184 
806 
398 
365 

2,868 
163 
117 
167 

2,460 

370 

58 



259 
225 
213 
284 

1,208 
572' 
623 

3,872 
270 
199 
226 

3,449 

547 

70 



68 

70 

59 

77 

73 

71 

80 

65J2 

82! 

83 

64 

68 

71 

61 



82 
63 
85 

67 
479 
165 
173 
02i;i. 

98 

50 
108 
307 
214 

27 



73 
54 

74 

58 
238 
124 
125 
092 1 

36 

40 

60 
676 1 
2141 

18 



80 

69 

101 

300 

155 

171 

,169 

71 

49 

48 

,203 

132 

17 



53 

60 

82 

73 

302 

177 

142 

1,040 

40 

44 

55 

1,099 

133 

30 



106 .. . 377 

63... 320 

50 ... 360 

68 ... 367 

226 99 1,644 

131 53 805; 

169 ... 780 

482 101 5,905 

83 ... I 328 

57... 240 

80...! 351 

599 201 5,085 

78. ..I 771 

22 ... 114 



377 
320 
360 
367 

1,644 
805 
780 

5,905 
328 
240 
351 

5,085 
771 
114 



8,463;12,017 69 4,939 2,882 3 ,628 3,330 2 ,214 454 17,447 17,447 



i I 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



27 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
various branches of instruction, Maps, etc. 

































Maps ;and 


Si 


































Prizes. 


< 








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396 


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182 


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427 


322 


249 


309 


143 


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368 14 


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167 


92 


171 


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109 


122 4 


4 


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245 


159 


69 


170 


66 


96 


113 


197 2 


1 


1 






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45 




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7 


370 


277 


301 


281 


136 


215 


209 


350! 19 


19 


19 




2 


36 


60 


3 


5 


8 


554 


356 


163 


212 


133 


152 


152 


471 25 


23 


23 




1 


67 


68 


3 




9 


71 


61 




55 


23 


37 


29 


10 


2 


2 


2 




10 


16 


1 


2 


10 
11 


97 
178 


53 
134 


47 
149 


55 
129 


23 
73 


28 
94 


23 

107 


104 
196 














27 
42 


"i 




44 


42 


42 




41 


14 




12 
13 


89 
136 
166 


67 
111 

140 


62 
136 
112 


68 

93 

132 


30 
26 
65 


32 
60 
99 


52 

118 

93 


89 


1 


1 


... 


1 


6 


10 

10 
47 






136 
114 




' 'i 




14 


9 


9 


9 




7 


75 




15 
16 


77 
224 


48 
166 






48 
66 


34 
86 


14 
102 














5 
58 


"i 




"54 


170 


54 11 


8 


8 






15 


1 


17 


91 


77 


50 


77 


23 


41 


23 


91 23 


6 


6 






23 


9 






1 8 


23 

271 


20 
146 


" 'i25 


20 
173 


. 3 

67 


10 

120 


5 

67 


23! . . . 
96 3 


' '3 


1 
3 








11 
43 


1 
3 




19 






30 




?,0 


32 


14 


32 


14 


9 


9 


9 


32 . .. 










4 


7 


1 


4 


tfl 


4,244 


2,619 


783 


2,000 


357 


1,101 


801 


1,458 39 


10 


10 




65 


146 


324 


42 


86 


?,?, 


682 


478 


482 


408 


198 


272 


309 


532! 62 


64 


61 




29 


53 


67 


3 


13 


23 


188 


125 


148 


127 


32 


70 


36 


148 


5 


b 


5 






13 


19 


2 


3 


24 


768 


341 


185 


329 


91 


182 


112 


384 


7 


6 


6 






1 


56 


2 


24 


25 


565 


355 


312 


370 


82 


168 


111 


370 


27 


1 


1 


5i 


1 


72 


68 


3 


12 


26 


437 


285 


375 


264 


99 


203 


210 


325 


7 


7 


7 






32 


54 


3 


8 


?7 


20 


13 


20 


13 


4 


8 


4 


20 












4 


4 . . . 




?8 


79 


4C 


50 


24 


2 


8 


8 


79 


. . . f . . . 










8 2 




29 


472 


250 


60 


253 


31 


100 


40 


344 


23 


6 


6 






7 


71 11 


31 




15,221 


9,534 


5,970 


8,433 


2,624 


4,732 


4,555 


9,177 359 


253 


249 


55 


197 


1,004 


1,582 117 


353 


1 


377 
320 
360 
367 
1,644 


222 
320 
360 
367 
1,644 


377 
320 
360 
367 
1,644 


159 
123 
201 
141 
1,644 


• 

106 
63 
50 

141 

525 


159 
123 
132 
141 
580 


159 
203 
201 
242 
1,644 


377 
320 
360 
367 
1,644 














26 
7 
8 

30 
184 


3 




2 
















3 












1 . 


4 














5 


99 


73 


73 


73 


73 




8 36 


R 


805 
780 


516 
780 


805 
780 


516 
780 


361 

169 


361 

311 


361 
780 


805 30 
780 .. . 


25 


25 




15 





30 
30 




7 


7 .. . 


8 


5,136 


3,584 


4,807 


3,634 


748 


2,408 


2,361 


4,421 508 


99 


99 


16 


16 


28 


175 


24 13 


9 


328 

240 

351 

5,085 


328 

190 

* 351 

3,524 


328 

240 

351 

5,085 


230 

190 

243 

3,524 


73 

57 
80 

807 


123 

101 

135 

1,740 


161 

101 

135 

5,085 


328 

240 

351 

5,085 














10 

8 

16 

306 


3 . . . 


10 















1 . . . 


11 














3 


12 


177 


201 


201 


27 25 


16 


... 16 


1 ? 


771 
114 


401 

87 


I 771 
114 


771 
114 


78 
22 


211 
52 


771 
52 


771 
114 












8 
11 


2 . . . 


14 













1 . . . 


















16,678 


12,674 


16,349 


12,270 


3,280 


6,577 


12,256 


15,963 


814 


398 


398 


116 


129 


44 


849 


50 


68 



28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



II. 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
-Table G. — Attendance, Pupils in the 



Towns. 



%2 

Oh 



Reading. 



1 Alexandria 458 

2 Almonte 144 

3 Amherstburg ... ! 288 

4 Arnprior 404 

5 Barrie ! 156 

6 Berlin 477 

7 Brockville 405 

8 Cobourg I 225 

9 Cornwall I 930 

10 Dundas > 132 

11. Fort William ... 196 

12 Gait I 74 

13 Goderich 63 

14 Hawkesbury ... 827 

15 Irg-rsoll 69 

16 Lindsay ... 376 

17 Mattawa .278 

1% Newmarket < 58 

19 Niagara Falls... 1 157 

20 North Bay 296 

21 Oakville 45 

22 Orillia 231 

23 Oshawa 90 

24 Owen Sound 116 

25 Paris 65 

26 Parkhill 51 

27 Pembroke 574 

28 Perth 249 

29 Peterborough ... 779! 

30 Picton * 53 

31 Port Arthur ... 226, 
3? Prescott 199j 

33 Preston 89 

34 Bat Portage ; 219 

35 Renfrew I 276 

36 St. Marys 74 

37 Sandwich 187 

38 Sarnia 222 

39 Sault Ste. Marie 258| 

40 Seaforth ! 104| 

41 Sturgeon Falls.. 356 

42 Sudbury 240 

43 Thorold 113 

44 Trenton 160 

45 Vankleekhill ... 285 

46 Walkerton ! 18 0J 

47 "Wallaceburg ... 169| 

48 Waterloo 135 

49 Whitby 45 



196 

79 

125 

216 

75 

253 

181 

117 

452 

64 

105 

33 

32 

408 

30 

148 

124 

32 

87 

150 

27 

129 

37 

57 

29 

24 

299 

132 

408 1 

271 

114 

112 

49| 

100 

145| 

30 

87 

112 

131 

52 

179 

113 

45 

74 

132 

77 

88 

61 

23 



2621 

65 

163i 

188, 

81 

224| 

224! 

108| 

478! 

68 

91 

41 

31 

419 

39 

228! 

154 

26i 

70. 

146; 

18 

102 

53 

59 

36 

27 

275 

117 

371 

26 

112 

87 

40 

119 

131 

. 44 

100 

110 

127 

52 

177 

127 

68 

86 

153 

103 

81 

74 

22 



242, 

86 
192 
255! 
Ill 
338 
274 
145; 
606 

66 
130 

571 

54 
608 

561 
258 
178 

36 
106 
184 

26 
178 

64! 

79 

49 

29 
372 
180 
498! 

36! 
149! 
117 

65! 
142 
202 

50 

97 
142 
139 

54 
184 
172 

90 
142 
153 
142 

89 

94 

32| 



53 

60 
67 
63 
71 
71 
68 
64 
65 
5 
66 
7 7 
86 
7 3 
81 
68 
64 
62 
67 
62 
58 
77 
71 
68 
75 
5 7 
65 
72 
64 
68 
66 
59 
73 
65 
73 
67 
52 
64) 
54! 
52| 
52j 
72 
80j 
88| 
54! 
79| 
52 
701 
7ll 



180 
51 
60 

111 
34 
76 
92 
61 

290 
19 
63 
11 
15 

319 
17 
76 
79 
17 
38 

119 
12 
42 
14 
35 
10 
7 

149 
62 

194 
14 
67 
47 
25 
76 
89 
17 
79 
47 
85 
13 

196 
64 
28 
21 
56 
34 
75 
24 



Totals 



Totals. 

M Counties, etc 

2 Citi-s 

3 Towns 



46 
14 
43 
59 
15 
55 
53 
22 

199 
35 
24 
12 
11 

190 
15 
45 
48 
9 
20 
41 
5 
32 



99 
32 
59 
50 
37 

134 
93 
40 

223 

37 

56 

18 

7 

183 
12 
70 
56 
4 
33 
49 
12 
57 



11 


19 


8 


17 


6 


12 


6 


15 


120 


118 


36 


30 


145 


167 


8 


9 


25 


45 


12 


37 


7 


16 


40 


25 


51 


54 


11 


10 


20 


48 


33 


50 


36 


32 


4! 


17 


37 


70 


45 


15 


17 


25 


37 


73 


52 



40 
28 
40 
11 



136 


76 


93 


74 


46 


56 


117 


101 


19 


22 


25 


28 


19 


14 


16 


14 


87 


48 



65! 

17 
44l 

109 
27i 

L36 
93 
4 6 

.17 
19 
25 
19 
16 
87 
16 
76 
39 
14 
38l 
46! 

fJ 
48 

26 

26 

17 

10 

105 
66 

157 
11 
40 
39 
28 
50 
53 
12 
22 

52 
25 
29 
18 
31 
46 
53 
44 
15 
36 



68 
30 

47 
75 
43 



35 



11,803, 5,800j 6,003 7,748! 66 3,3131,9052,3892,175 



17,867 
17,447 
11,803 



9,052 
8,984 
5,800 



8,815 9,773 
8,463:12,017 
6,003 ! 7,748 



72 
45 
14 
28 
41 
11 
52 
20 
30 
20 
13 
82 
55 
116 
11 
49 
64 
13 
28 
29 
24 
18 
39 
53 
31 
14 
35 
22 
31 
51 
42 
36 
16 
16 



240 
113 
160 
285 
180 
169 
135 
45 



6,626 2,995 3,307:2,623 2,050 
4,939 2,882 3,628 3.330 2.214 
3,313 1,905 2,389 2,175 1,926 



J al^i £}'!' i?So *Z41? 23,836 23,281,29,538 62.69 14,878 



5 Grand tot's, 1902! 45 '954 

6 Increases 

7 Decreases 



8 Percentages 



1,153 



23,314^22,650 



522! 



631 



50.59 



49.41 



28,817 62.69 14,544[7 



782 9,324!8,128 
956 8,709 7,906 



721 ! 



334 



62.69 



31.58 



615 



174 



16.51 19.8 



222 



17.25 



458 


458 


14< 


144 


288 


288 


404 


404 


156 


156 


477 


477 


405 


405 


225 


225 


930 


930 


132 


132 


196 


196 


74 


74 


6,1 


63 


827 


827 


69 


69 


376 


376 


278 


278 


58 


58 


157 


157 


296 


• 296 


4 5 


45 


231 


231 


90 


90 


116 


116 


65 


65 


51 


51 


574 


574 


249 


249 


77 9 


779 


53 


53 


226 


226 


199 


199 


89 


89 


219 


219 


276 


276 


74 


74 


187 


187 


222 


222 


258 


258 


104 


104 


356 


356 



240 
113 
160 
285 
180 
169 
135 
45 



1,926 95 11,203 11,803 



266 17,867 17,867 

454J17, 447 17,447 

95111 ,803 11,803 



190J 

093 



815 47,117 47 



756!45,964 



97 



59 



13.13 1.73 



1,153 



100 



45 



117 
964 



1,153 



100 



*In incoi 



rporated villages included with Counties, etc., there were 2,663 pupils, with an average daily attendance of 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



29 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS.— Concluded. 

various branches of instruction, Maps, etc. — Concluded. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
6 
6 
7 
S 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
2 2 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
4 3 
44 
4 5 
4 6 
47 
48 
49 



a 6 

II 



458 
144 
253 
404 
156 
477 
405 
225 
930 
132 
196 

74 

63 
827 

69 
376 
278 

58] 
157 
296 

45l 
231 

90 ! 
116 

65i 

51 
574 
249 
779 

53 
226 
199 

89 
219 
276 

74 1 
187 
222 
258| 
104 
356 
240 
113 
160 
285 
180 
169 
135 

36 



278 

79 

253 

234 

156 

346 

313 

142 

5771 

58 

109 

60 

63 

440 

69 

255 

207 

32 

99 

136 

45 

189 

76 

73 

49 

38 

425 

1871 

441 

38 

159 

152 

58 

219 

187 

39 

108 

175 

137 

73 

84 

240 

70 

160 

285i 

180! 

94 

92 

25 



458 
144 



404 
156 

477 
405 
225 
930 
132 



74! 

63 
827 

69 s 
376 
278 

58 
157 



45 

231 

90 

58 



51 

500 
249 
779 



226! 
199 



219 
50 
74 



258 



356 

240| 
1131 
160j 

285! 
180 
169 
135 

25! 



278 

79 

185 

234 

156 

346 

260 

164 

577 

58 ; 

109 

60 

37 

553 

69 

255 

207 

32 

99 

136 

16 

100 

76 

73j 

49 

38 

425 1 

151 

584 

31 

226 

199 

58 

103 

187; 

48 

88 

92 

173 

91 

170 

240 

70 

77 

285 

180 

94 

52 

36 



133 

30! 

-47! 
7 5 
43 
76 

7 i 
56 

101 

35 

28 

14 
14 
44 
15 
120 
51 
14 
28 
55! 
16 
52; 
20 
56 
20 
13 

82; 

55 1 
116 
11! 
49i 
64 
7 
28 
29 
27: 
18 
39 
105! 
31 ! 
18 
43 
22 
31 
50 
42 
36 
16 
16 



133 

47! 
91 
75 
70 

212 

167! 
78; 

218 
35| 
53 
20 
30 

398 
25 

211 
66 
14 
28 
87 
11 

100 
32 
56 
37 
23 

187 

121 

274 
22 

119 

103 
31 
78j 
82 
27 
40 
92 

105! 
56| 
47! 
61 1 
33 
77! 

104 
86 
51 
52 
25 



133 
30J 
471 
75 
43 

346 

167 
56 

218; 
22 ! 
53 
14 
37 
44 
25 

120 
40 
14 
28 
41 
33 

100 
32 
56 
37 
13 

251 

121 

274 
22 
89 
64 
31 

103 
82 
27 

108 
39| 

105 
31 
18 
61 
70 

114 
51 

180 
51 
16 
16 



458 

30 

253 

329 

156 

477 

405 

225 

930 

132 

196 

74 

63 

827 

44 

376 

278 

58 

157 



15 



35 35 



35 



45 24 24 



37[ 37 
11 11 



45 
231 

90 
116 

37 



574 
249 
723 

31 
226 

59 



219 

276 1 



2221 
258 
104 
356; 
240 
113! 
1601 
285 
180 
169 
135! 



37 
11 



37 



30 



Maps 


and 


Pi 


Prizes. 


Ti 






a 






s5 


r/j 




. 


ft 


ft 








<i> 




H 


X _N 













O ft 


o* 






If 




e > 


B 


2 6C 


B< 





fc 


55 



29 



151... 

12 ... 

4j 1 

11 ... 



8 
28 



6 1 
15 . . . 

10 1 
10 .... 
27, 2 
10 ... 



17 
10; 

10! 

8! 

11 



18 ... 
12!... 
22 1 



10 



11,759 8,004 9,925 7,906 2,165 4,190 3,748 10, 5( 



120 119 119 2 78 82 582 24 50 



1 15,221 9,534 5,970 8,4332,624 4,732 4,555 9,177 

2 16,678 12,674 16,349 12,270 3,280 6,577 12,256 15,963 

3 11,759 8,004 9,92"> 7,906 2,165 4,190 3,748 10, 566J 



13 



359 ! 253 249 55 197 1,004 1,582 117 353 
814 398 398 116 129 44 849 50 68 
120 119 119 2 78 82! 582' 24 50 



4 

5 


43 
41 


658 30 

952 29 


,212 32 
,788 31 


24i 
, 55y 


6 

7 


1 


706 


424 


685 














28,609 8,069 15,499 20,559 35,706 1,293 770 766 173 404 1 ,130 3 ,013 191 471 
27,409 7,544 15^035 14,687 34,459 1,026 727 714 66 333 2,076 2,976 173 449 



1,200 525 



464 5,872 1,247 267 43 52 107! 71 



8 92.66 64.12 68.43 60.72 17.12 32.89 



43.63 75.78 2.741.631.62.36.85 



946 



2.39 



37 



18 



22 



1615 ; the numbers in the Readers were : 1st Part I, 1055 ; Part II, 484 ; 2nd, 488 ; 3rd, 335 ; 4th, 245 ; 5th, 56. 



30 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I.— Table H.— 





Receipts. 




Collegiate Institutes. 


1 

> 

c3 
60 

►3 


"S 

p 

o 

9 

a 

oS 
be 

.1 

o 

"3 

P 


08 

O 

o 

9 

a 

OC 

n 

.& 
"3 

'a 
p 


CO 

<v 

CD 



A 



■3 

O 
H 

O 

■a 
(0 

,a 



a 

oj 
00 
<v 
O 

a 

o3 

"o3 

w 


9 

ft 



CB 

"3 
O 


CO* 

s 

B 


S3 
<D 

H 


1 Aylmer 1 

2 Barrie 

3 Brantf ord ...» 

4 Brookville 

5 Chatham 


$ c. 

906 35 

a 1,148 5«? 

a 1,329 45 

1,163 36 

a 1,319 46 

963 31 

ab 1,713 70 
a 981 40 
a 1,276 0* 
a 1,102 12 

a 1,198 97 
ac 5,906 93 

1,013 28 
b 2,563 18 
a 1,241 02 
b 1,555 60 

a 1,098 45 
a 1,129 46 
a 1.167 26 
a 1,129 42 
1,336 32 

a 1,278 17 

955 51 
a 1,313 47 

b 1,259 76 
a 1,040 96 

a 1,269 97 

951 r '4 

a 1,332 51 

1,137 28 
a 1,018 CI 
b 2,162 20 
a 1,020 Cl 
a 1,393 15 
a 1,371 63 
a 1,379 55 

1,023 93 
a 870 16 

892 78 
ab 2,336 06 


$ e. 

1,465 34 
1.148 58 


$ c. 

1,650 00 
1.30C 00 
7,900 00 
6,300 00 

6,554 00 

1.7X 00 
2,460 56 
3,100 00 
4,000 00 
2.600 00 

5,805 24 
12,959 97 

2,400 00 

6,400 00 

3,714 10 

23,043 79 

2,240 77 
2,800 00 
4,700 00 
2,600 CO 
16,010 00 

5,972 00 

3,594 86 


% c. 

1,008 GO 
1,649 00 
2,476 90 
1,199 61 

1,633 95 

902 00 
1,040 00 
1,140 50 
1,947 00 
1,260 00 

1,215 80 
4,205 75 

616 25 
4,556 96 
1,467 25 
3,877 00 


$ c. 

363 91 
2,244 43 
1,023 97 
1,103 38 

1,360 45 

81 0'J 

447 18 

654 95 

442 55 

2,862 57 

476 57 
244 00 

402 12 
854 10 
54.? 74 
712 89 

3,479 44 
2,014 13 
648 94 
1,537 17 
5,418 51 

2,101 63 

210 31 
90 00 

2,105 13 
2,417 58 

278 63 
329 11 
164 90 


$ C. 

5,393 60 

7,490 59 

12,730 32 

11,009 85 

10,867 86 

5,254 76 
7,744 94 
6,994 85 
9,530 75 
9,124 94 

8,696 58 
23,316 65 

5,927 45 
14,3S0 24 

9,124 QQ 

30,399 23 

10,214 99 
8,744 59 
8,038 95 
7,839 96 

32,874 33 

14,155 10 

6,341 98 

11,435 22 

7,3 :7 4 51 
8,982 98 

12,204 31 

5,704 16 

12,809 12 

10,541 57 
7,825 03 
14,842 32 
6,200 53 
34,235 99 
22,952 01 
25,253 63 

8,416 73 
4,540 22 

5,167 50 

15,11.5 71 
1.0,169 60 


$ c. 

3,668 00 
5,720 64 
9,000 00 
6,933 36 

8,050 00 


1,243 50 


6 Clinton 

7 Cobourg ... 


1,608 45 
2,083 50 
1,118 00 
1,365 19 
1,300 25 


4,441 75 
5,160 00 
4,510 00 
7,183 32 
5,343 60 

6,490 00 


8 Collingwood 

9 Gait 

10 Goderich 

11 Guelph 


12 Hamilton . . ; 

13 Ingersoll . . 


1,495 80 


17,162 75 

4,860 0O 
11,362 68 


14 Kingston . 


15 Lindsay 

16 London 

17 Morrisburg 


2,159 78 

1,203 00 

3,396 33 
2,700 00 
1,387 20 
1,129 42 


6,712 57 
21,722 50 

5,082 96 


18 Napanee 


101 00 

135 55 

1,413 95 

10,109 50 

2,335 00 

333 on 
2,526 75 

36 75 
1,025 CO 

65 00 

974 65 

1,798 00 

77 25 
1,314 65 
3,643 95 
1,083 00 
5,875 00 
3,350 00 
5,559 75 

1,752 00 


5,279 20 
5,830 00 
5,380 00 


19 Niagara Falls 

20 Orillia 


21 Ottawa 


18,205 00 


22 Owen Sound 

23 Perth 


2,468 30 

1,248 30 
7,500 00 

1,522 87 
2,099 44 

3,687 34 

973 66 

1,635 81 

2,127 04 
1,856 66 
1.300 00 
2,035 77 


9,515 00 
4.504 00 


24 Peterborough 

25 Renfrew 


8,103 20 
5,010 00 


2,450 00 
2,400 00 

6.903 37 
2,475 00 
7,877 90 

7,200 00 

1,900 00 
6,000 00 
1,900 00 
22,960 67 
17,960 67 
17,960 66 

4,520 00 
800 00 

2,254 00 

12,200 CO 
4,150 t-0 


26 Ridgetown 

27 St. Catharines . . . : 

28 St. Marys 

29 St. Thomas 

30 Sarnia 


4,415 30 

7.895 98 
4,476 75 
9,355 68 

6,966 60 


31 Seaforth 


1.735 71 

1.736 17 
161 75 

4,007 17 
269 6^ 
353 67 

330 89 

854 90 

214 82 

1,606 79 
'272 72 


4,632 09 


32 Stratford 

33 Strathroy 


9,081 64 
5,080 CO 


34 Toronto (Harbord) 


20,684 00 






16,260 CO 


36 Toronto (Jarvis) 

37 Toronto Junction . . 

38 Vankleek Hill 


789 91 
2,115 16 

1,386 90 


17,642 13 

5,820 CO 
3,571 6, 


39 Whitby 

40 Windsor 


419 00 

33 00 
1,838 12 


4,216 00 
7,450 91 


41 Woodstock 


1,572 71 


7,300 00 


Totals 


56,545 45 


59,621 21 


251,717 £6 


76,025 84 


46,156 54 


490,066 60 


330,079 08 



a Grant ($50) for Cadet Corps included. 



b Grant for Technical Education included. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



31 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Financial Statement. 









$ 



64 21 



5 853 45 



6 

7 121 96 
8 1,097 00 

9 

10 



11 

12 

| I « i J 

13: 

14 

15 749 77 
16 



17 

18 112 00 

19 271 &3 
20. .186 05 

21 9,069 38 

22 07 15 

23 350 10 
24 1,100 00 



305 58 
61 08 



27 298 53 

28 218 00 

29 460 71 

30 205 25 

31 8 00 

32 237 23 1 

33 

34 5000 00; 

35 

36 . A 



Expenditure. 



37 


883 


63 


38 


15 00 


39 


167 


66 


40 


5,367 50 


41 


590 


90 


27,861 


72 



47 45 
272 65 
113 58 
550 00 



13 5C 



S3 1 

is* 

laid 

-a,- 0*03 

£Soq 



743 93 
16 89 
30 02 

120 35 
492 50 

161 03 
189 20 
106 78 
548 60 

53 66 
113 94 
373 80 
235 31 
890 18 

684 95 
36 24 



425 87 



842 37 
25 30 
99 17 



15 



1,609 45 
165 71 
344 34 



375 11 
72 97 



368 96 
45 93 







6 30 


197 


14 


22 


00 


75 


23 


33 84 


129 


77 


136 


52 


102 47 


82 


35 


657 


89 


105 


40 


372 


59 



78, 48 
69 33 
24 64 



307 08 



45 74 



352 44 
3 75 



70 11 
67 93 

200 16 
51 24 
76 49 



12? 44 
21.0 01 
236 42 

252 29 
72 30 



63 54 
55 10 



10,345 89 4,282 19 



'£ ° 

u oJ 
S3 13 

o o 



«- a . 

m 



Charges per Year. 



1,613 94 
1,327 96 
2,854 02 
2,00 7 56 

1,767 27 

777 51 
1,686 83 

218 64 
1,563 86 
1,026 35 

1,539 71 
5,661 40 

821 41 

1,490 57 

1,450 67 

7.401 54 

918 13 
1,229 34 
1,538 14 
1,328 83 

4.402 69 

1,593 63 

1,177 25 
1,880 38 

1,166 58 
4,015 66 

3,153 60 

906 30 

2,825 63 

2,627 94 
892 68 
4,627 89 
1,050 40 
6,578 57 
6,532 75 
6,964 81 

1,427 90 
606 14 

622 25 

1,862 70 
2,177 67 



5,393 60 

7,321 25 

11,967 60 

9,496 92 

10,867 86 

5,254 76 
7,044 02 
6,603 '1 
8,893 84 
6,536 89 

8,252 53 
23,316 65 

5,924 79 
13,700 34 

9,124 89 
30,045 23 

6,133 23 
6,803 81 
8,038 16 
7,130 'A 
32,874 33 

11,860 73 

■ 6,113 33 
11,083 58 

7,260 47 
8,495 79 

12,190 48 

5,696 46 

12,809 12 

9,999 95 
5,670 16 

14,023 25 

6,130 40 

34,085 46 

23.168 47 
25,187 .0 

• 8,383 82 
4,640 °2 

5,078 88 

15,113 71 

10.169 60 



169 34 
762 72 

1,512 93 



700 92 

391 44 

636 92 

2,588 05 

444 05 



2 
679 



354 05 



4,081 
1,940 



709 



2,294 37 



228 
351 



114 
487 



541 

2,154 

819 

70 



10.00; Res. Form I., 5.00. 

10.00. 

Res. 10.00 ;'Non.-res., 16.00. 

F. I., 5.00; F's II., III., IV., 10.00; 

Co., 5.00. 
City,' 6.00; Co., 10.00; Form I., City 

free. 
6.00; 8.00; 10.00. 
12.00. 

Town, 7.50; others, 10.00. 
Co., 10.00; others, 14.00. 
Res., 5.00, 7.00, 10.00; Co., 6.00, 8.00, 
10.00; non-res., 8.00, 10.00, 12.00. 
City, free; Co., 10.00; others, 20-00. 
Res., F. I., 2.50; other F's, 10.00; 

non-res., 20.00. 
7.50. 

5.00 to 33.00. 
7.50; 10.00. 
Res., free 1st year; others, 10.00; 

Co., 10.00; other Cos., 30.00. 
Free. 

Co., free; others, 10.00. 
Free. 

Town, 5.00; others, 10.00. 
Res., 20.00, 25.00; non-res., 45.00, 

50.00. 
Res., 8.00-12.00; Co., 10.00; non-res., 

12.00-15.00. 
Co., 5.00; non-res., 16.00. 
F. I., 5.00; other F's, 10.00; non-res., 
25.00. 
04| Res., free; non-res., 15.00. 
19 Town, F's II., III., IV., 6.00; others, 

10.00. 
83I Res., free; non-res., 16.00. 
70 Town, 5.00; others, 10.00. 
City, F's I. & II., free; III. 
10.00; Co., 10.00; others, 
62 Free. 
871 F. I., 6.00; II., 8.00; III & IV., 10.00. 

07 ! 10.00 



& IV. 
30.00. 



13 



32 91 



F. I., town, free; others, 10.00. 
F. I., free; others, 13.00 to 32.00. 
F. I., free; others, 7.00 to 32.00. 
F. I., free; others, 7.00 to 32.00: 

6.00 extra to non-res. 
10.00; 15.00. 
Free. 



62 



95,317 05 467,885 93 22,180 67 



17. 



6.00 



S. D 
10.00. 
Free. 
City and Co 

9 free; 32 fee. 



Co. 



.50 ; others, 



7.50; others, 10.00 



c Grant ($4,500) for Normal College included. 



32 



THE REPORT OF THE 



o. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 

I.— Table H.— 



High Schools. 



Alexandria . 
Almonte . . . 
Arnprior . . . 
Arthur . . 
Athens . . 
Aurora . . 
Beamsville . 

8 Belleville . . 

9 Berlin . . 

10 Bowmanville 



11 Bradford .... 

12 Brampton . . 

13 Brighton . . 

14 Caledonia . . 

15 Campbeilford . 

16 Carleton Place 

17 Cayuga . . 

18 Colborne . . 

19 Cornwall . . 

20 Deseronto . . 

21 Dundas . . 

22 Dunnville . . 

23 Dutton 

24 East Toronto . 

25 Elora 

26 Essex 

27 Fergus 

28 Forest 

29 Fort William . 

30 Gananoque . . 

31 Georgetown . . 

32 Glencoe 

33 Gravennurst . . 

34 Grimsby . . 

35 Hagersville . . 

36 Harriston . . 

37 Hawkesbury . . 

38 Iroquois . . 

39 Kemptville . . 



40 Kincardine . . 

41 Leamington . . 

42 Listowel 

43 Lucan 

44 Madoc 

45 Markham . . 

46 Meaford 

47 Mitchell 

48 Mount Forest . . 

49 Newburgh . . 

50 Newcastle . . 

51 Newmarket . . 

52 Niagara 

53 Niagara Falls 8. 

54 North Bay . . 

55 Norwood 



Receipts. 



$ c. 
651 78 
716 40 
610 20 
667 22 
688 84 
610 13 
484 60 
828 79 
1,730 18 
797 18 

582 48 
838 81 
480 31 
574 23 
662 14 
666 55 
576 01 
464 06 
853 13 
639 40 
697 58 
692 54 
587 43 



b l 



546 92 j 
158 91 
583 18 
600 79; 
943 64 
674 30 ; 
599 14 | 
609 64 
972 40 | 
439 97 
616 72! 
625 38 
604 27 
728 84 
724 98! 

759 V.\ 
685 90 
660 9C 
685 58 
573 50 
731 7o! 
800 83 

647 80 
759 91 1 
552 251 
473 59 
659 65 j 
433 06 
578 52i 
849 76i 

648 57 I 



$ c. 
734 74 
716 40 
610 20 
911 81 

2,408 84 
700 00 
530 00 
345 00 

1,967 S8 
797 18 

886 51 
1,768 81 

797 76 
1,424 23 

910 14 

666 55 
1,891 88 

484 22 
4,114 26 



1,047 58 
1,926 79 
1,461 28 



759 00 
1,967 50 

583 18 
1,321 48 

* '924' 30 
599 14 
642 91 



559 40 

616 72 

625 38 

1,604 27 

2,396 o5 

1,687 0* 

1,4-50 59 

1,335 32 

800 00 

938 75 

1,580 47 

1,530 00 

1,705 18 

799 20, 

1,233 05l 

1,655 27 

473 59 

782 00 

490 00 

578 52 

"655*381 



1,33 



c 
530 00 

2,336 87 

1,800 00 
850 00 

1,350 00 
650 00 
700 00 

4,221 66 
10,528 81 

2.295 00 

600 00 
2,100 00 

500 00 

811 00 
1,906 04 
2,700 00 

650 00 
1,230 08 
3,547 97 
2,700 00 

558 41 

800 00 

700 00 
1,500 00 

800 00 
2,000 00 
1,800 00 

500 00 
2,324 4F 
1,921 98 
1,228 01 

800 00 

1,200 no 

2,015 78 

790^08 

1,300 00 



1,200 00 

672 07 

1,142 V7 

1,450 00 

800 00 

900 00 

700 00 

400 00 

2,225 00 

1,200 00 

1,400 00 

485 4o 

1,000 00 

800 00 

550 00 

1,087 55 

1,840 00 

2,755 25 



c. 



173 75 
129 00 
726 50 
352 00 
693 00 
9 00 
208 50 
1,524 00 
459 70 

656 50 
1,179 00' 
131 60 
79 00 
631 50 
139 50 

"l24'7b 

64 00 

164 25 

565 50 

36 00 

601 00 

169 On 

517 50 

73 70 

407 50 

400 00 



124 50 
687 7<= 
613 50 
362 00 



872 25 



1,427 85 

1,057 On 

61 On 

927 50 

1,098 On 
581 00 

1,297 00 
750 50 
500 00 
755 25 



pa 



139 00 
840 00 



4 50 
610 00 



$ c. 

1,903 0? 
552 29 

1.761 56 
183 30 
494 68 
496 00 
240 71 



433 3^ 
858 82 

60 36 

69 76. 
503 26 
673 61 
106 50 
699 If 
336 l c 
1,364 21 
682 6n 
342 49 
599 74 
908 75 
544 18 



189 26 
89 79 
999 51 
726 21 
188 9 C 
24 l 00 



85 96 
52 4* 

994 28 
1,649 25 
4,720 59 
1,185 7F 

737 33 
89 00 

811 27 
2,735 7f 
285 12 
124 04 
188 03 
683 1* 
156 At 
230 oq 
2% OP 
347 70 
782 SO 
442 60 
242 50 
976 6" 
59 5" 
151 25 



$ c. 
4,619 54 
4,495 71 
4,910 9f 
3,338 83 
5,294 36 
3,149 U 
1,964 31 
5,603 95 
16,184 21 
5,207 86 

2,785 8F 
5,956 40 
2,412 93 
3,562 07 
4,216 32 
4,871 78 
3,454, 08 
3,667 38 
9,261 90 
3,846 14 
3,468 81 
4,364 08 
3,893 89 
1,669 00 
2,812 68 
5,289 90 
4,373 37 
3,548 48 
3,457 04 
3,669 08 
3,114 04 

2.752 01 
2,566 82 
4,009 43 
3,672 77 
8,143 60 
3,394 29 
5,062 82 
4.600 96 

5,200 54 

6,268 00 
3,473 52 

3,746 37 

3,623 00 

4,641 90 

5,637 9* 

3,377 9* 

4,444 20 

3,040 71 

2,868 6f 

3 524 ?,F 

1,715 56 

3,221 23 

2.753 8? 
4,820 4f 



$ c. 
2,610 00 
3,235 25 
2,450 00 
2,207 00 

3.134 70 
2,170 83 
1,215 00 
4,525 00 
6,025 60 
3,667 85 

1,780 31 

4,710 00 

1,750 01 

2.135 39 
3,077 60 
3,230 00 
2,145 59 
1,560 00 
4,750 00 
2,571 84 
2,489 40. 
2,935 33 
2,568 49 

701 00 
2,179 50 
3,010 00 
2,225 00 
2,200 00 
1,943 40 
2,506 94 
2,300 00 
1,971 00 
1,643 50 
1,300 00 
2,319 90 
2,8910 41 
2,150 00 
3,100 00 
3,707 75 

3,347 3t 
3,485 00 
2,675 00 
2,574 50 
2,149 05 
3,300 00 
3,489 90 
2,424 00 
3,048 09 
2,220 00 
1,250 00 
2,380 75 
1,250 00 
2,135 00 
2,176 80 
2,200 00 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



33 



A^D HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

Financial Statement. —Continued. 





Expenditure. 




\ 


Balances. 




a 

o3 
| 
O 
P< 

03 

G G 

03 0; 

■3 > 

to O 

00 Q. 
bCq 

e.g 
S^ 
s g 

pq 


03 
-O 

o 

1 

a 

o 
o 

o 

o3 

"© 

O 
A 
co 
O 
CO • 

u to 

'2 § 
p*2 


2 O o3 

£ vvo 

eg ^ 

03 H V 

be' co 

co G 
cy | 

£e a- 3 G 
■2 G Qj+3 


|| 
t° 

s« 

V 
to a3 

*s . 

8Sc£ 

2 G * 


9 

'S 

G 
a> 






Charges per Year. 


$ e. 
1 129 40 


% c. 


8 c. 
76 50 


$ c. 
1,123 71 

577 93 
575 13 

578 45 
561 79 
356 69 
439 26 

1,078 95 

2,017 47 

880 29 

646 24 
746 50 
360 68 
734, 60 
897 20 
665 85 
496 66 
300 28 

1,154 40 
795 57 
619 82 
780 11 
118 33 
102 83 
421 77 

1,105 87 

1,368 21 
284 36 
941 92 
883 55 
752 00 
632 45 
670 88 
138 96 

1,308 62 
582 95 
534 71 

1,327 60 
736 09 

794 91 

2.356 83 

680 19 

1,097 51 

1,241 58 

680 61 

2,032 14 

511 12 

1,105 37 

443 57 

405 83 

705 17 

288 96 

632 60 

577 03 

1,385 11 


8 c. 
3.939 61 

4.113 18 
3,574 73 
3,338 83 

4,160 80 
2,659 15 
1,654 76 
5,603 95 

16,184 21 
4,775 64 

2,426 55 
5,607 68 
2,161 69 
3,179 24 

4,216 32 
4,184 56 
2,891 96 
2,071 14 
6,219 40 
3,684 63 

3.250 77 
4,364 08 
3,108 76 
1,587 32 
2,798 22 

4,825 51 
3,670 45 
2,681 06 
3,457 04 
3,669 08 

3.114 04 

2.752 01 
2,391 11 
3,164 55 
3,672 77 
5,915 1$ 
2,68.4 71 

4,490 80 
4,600 96 

4.566 74 
5,896 14 
3,420 59 
3,696 17 
3,415 14 
4,224 14 
5,522 04 
3.011 13 
4,395 09 
2,789 84 
1,812 58 

3.251 58 
1,645 92 
2.P65 2?. 

2.753 83 
4,610 45 


$ c. 

679 93 

382 53 

1,336 23 


Free. 


2 300 00 




lies., 1.00; Co., 6.00; others, 11.00 


3 500 00 


49 60 

180 16 

37 50 

97 92 

50 




Res., free; non-res., 10.00 


4 152 00 


221 22 
16 71 
33 71 


10.00. 


5 410 10 
6 

7 


1,133 56 
489 98 
309 55 


Res., free; Co., 5.00; others, 10.00. 

10.00. 

Free. 


8 




Res., free; others, 25.00 


9 7,119 86 

10 201 00 


702 59 
26 50 


318 69 




" 432 24 

359 30 

348 72 
251 24 
382 83 


10.00. 

F. I., 4.00; F. II., 6.00; F III. A 


11 




IV., 7.50. 
F. I., free; others, 10.00. 


12 

13 

14 31 69 


4fc 65 

20 73 
277 56 

"'238'?i 
249 71 

21 20 


108 53 
30 ft 


10.00. 

Res., free; Co., 7.50. 

Free; other Cos., 4.50. 


15 181 02 


60 50 
50 00 


Res., 6.00; Co. and non-res., 7.50. 


16 

17 


687 22 
562 12 
1,596 24 
3,042 56 
161 51 
218 04 


Res., free; Co., 5.00; non-res., 10.00. 
Free. 


18 132 90 
19 


56 76 

315 00 

11 40 

53 57 

381 5* 

130 68 

249 44 

28 36 

28 8-0 

11 13 

196 70 

95 22 

99 04 

52 29 


Free; non-res. and Co., 7.50. 
Free. 


20 

21 

22 139 05 


305 82 
87 98 

128 r03 

101 50 
61 25 
29 89 

680 8» 
16 89 


Res., free; others, 10.00. 

Town, 9.50; Co., 10.00. 

Town and Co., free; others, 10.00. 


23 189 76 

24 472 80 

25 138 70 

26 

27 49 22 
28 


785 13 
81 68 
14 46 
464 39 
702 92 
867 42 


10.00. 

Res., 10.00; non-res., 20.00. 

Res., 5.00; non-res. and Co., 10.00. 

Co. free; others, 10.00. 

10.00. 
10.00. 


29 471 5» 


5 00 
178 15 

7 25 
148 56 


Free. 


30 1 40 




Free to res. ; Co. & non-res 5 00 


31 2 50 
32 




F. I., 7 00; others, 10.00. 
10.00. 


33 25 62 


51 11 

io'io 

300 25 


175 71 
844 88 


10.00. 


34 1,710 15 
35 


15 44 
34 15 
13 65 


Free. 
Free. 


36 2,127 84 
37 


2,228 50 
709 58 
572 02 


10.00. 
Free. 


38 

39 


""136 '47 

330 82 
14 17 
10 40 


63 20 
20 65 

93 70 

23 94 
55 00 

24 16 


Free. 

Res., free; Co., 5.00; non-res , 65 


40 

41 16 20 

42 

43 


633 80 
371 86 

52 93 

50 20 
207 86 
417 76 
115 92 
366 85 

49 20 

250 87 

1,056 10 

272 67 

69 64 
356 01 


per cent, of cost. 
H. 8. Dist., 8.00; others, 10.00. 
Co., free; non-res., 10.00. 
F. I., 7.00; others, 10.00. 
10.00. 


44 24 51 




H. S. Dist., 7.00; Co., 10.00. 


45 

46 


180 42 


63 11 


10.00. 

Town, 8.00; others, 10.00. 


47 


76 01 
80 21 

' ' ' 57 25 

38 60 
106 96 

"l'.025 34 






48 

49 84 04 

50 74 50 

51 28 72 


161 41 
42 2Z 
25 00 
98 34 


10.00; F. I., free to re». 

Free. 

7.50. 

10.00. 


54 


51 98 


Free. 
Free. 


5 


1 


210 C^ 


6.00. 



34 



THE REPORT OF THE 



*No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I.— Table H.— 





Receipts. 




High Schools. 


4 

a 

2 

Efc 

CD 

> 

d 

'So 

CD 


d 

o - 
o 

p 

g 

6j0 

"3 
Pi 

'3 ■ 

'3 
p 


a 
o 
o 

1 
So 

"3 

Pi 

|3 

3 
3 


CD 
CD 

"o 

O 

o 


m 
CD 
g 

P 

C 

Ch 

CD 

O 
•P 
P ' 
cS 

a> 

o 

s 

3 
ffl 


A 

'3 
a 

CD 
s- 

1 


1 

9 

3 
1 

■ a 

a> 
o 
1 
H 


56 Oakville 


$ c 

492 70' 
458 84 
84? 95 
764 52 
633 14 
582 36 
740 41 
724 40 
854 16 
1,133 72 
455 84 
580 78 
849 78 
a 717 52 
429 79 

608 92 
1,004 60 

482 40 
990 48 
8*01 39 
684 90 
512 54 
482 30 
455 98 
547 71 
587 59 
643 11 
629 52 
a 678 97 
443 98 
735 42 
443 48 
511 89 
611 01 
667 55 
679 68 
509 22 

609 10 
614 76 


$ c. 

1,260 87 
458 84 

1,05*0 00 
764 52 
633 14 
582 36 
740 41 

1,730 95 

2,500 00 


$ e. 

914 53 

686 35 
1,800 05 
3,888 O'O 
2,200 00 

725 00 
3.522 96 
2,600 00 
3,00-0 00 
2,707 Hi 

889 12 
1,100 00 
1,420 46 
1,335 86 

623 17 
2,021 4C 
1,490 31 

250 
1,950 00 
1,812 05 
2,928 91 

512 54 
1.8C0 00 

250 \)0 


$ c 

303 06 
154 00 
1,405 75 
968 91 
249 60 
842 10 

" "6*66 


$ c. 
35 54 


$ c. 

3,006 64 
1,758 03 
5,098 75 
7,039 87 
4,254 93 
3,127 07 
5,008 48 

7.627 39 
7,065 27 
3,880 13 
1,847 2C 

2,#90 16 
5,932 30 
3,632 25 

1.628 i2 
3,166 04 
2,864 91 
2,381 01 
4,299 57 
4,752 59 
3,955 56 
2,867 21 
2,832 39 
2,527 41 
3,342 89 
3,182 93 
3.454 57 
4,082 14 
.V387 27 
2,262 03 
5,158 39 
1,713 05 
2,349 19 
3,342 08 
5,004 74, 
5,081 il 
2,330 62 
3,132 69 

10,278 45 

336,670~76 
490 066 6C 


$ C 

2,040 00 


57 Omemee 

58 Orangeville 


1,421 68 
3,935 0/Q 
4,416 60 


"653 92 

539 05 

395 25 

4 70 

2,572 04 

705 11 

39 25 

46 40 

43 63 

1,574 53 

98 42 

'"b5'49 

370 00 

270 47 

692 59 

46 00 

70 75 

1,125 38 
100 00 
700 45 
711 98 
307 75 
420 35 
364 99 
55 90 
874 07 

1 04C 34 
250 09 
232 41 
840 12 

2.222 94 

696 22 

175 40 

89 39 

6,054 33 

58,525 77 
46,156 54 

104,682 31 
99,876 28 


60 Paris 

61 Parkhill 


2,600 00 
2,112 75 


62 Pembroke 

63 Petrolea 

64 Picton 

65 Port Arthur 

66 Port Dover 

67 Port Elgin 

68 Port Hope 

69 Port Perry 

70 Port Rowan 


3.515 25 
3,742 26 

4.516 68 
2,533 51 
1,400 00 
2,370 00 

4,458 01 
2,700 00 
1,309 95 
2,191 66 


455 84 
756 00 
849 78 
1,044 20 
575 36 
406 73 


509 75 

1,237 75 

436 25 

63 50 


72 Rat Portage 

73 Richmond Hill . . 

74 Sault Ste. Marie 


9 ,000 00 


808 14 


570 00 
666 50 
4 00 
?71 00 
31 75 
362 00 
165 00 
483 20 


1,698 80 
2,665 00 
3,800 00 


2,089 15 

685*66 

188 09 

955 98 

1,600 00 

587 59 

643 11 

211 03 

1,049 80 

443 98 

1,201 63 

441 48 

911 89 

1,290 95 

1,660 25 

1,705 21 

700 00 

691 35 

614 76 


76 Smith's Falls 

77 Smithville 

78 Stirling 


3.590 00 
1,730 00 
1,500 00 


79 Streetsville 

80 Sydenham 


1,433 75 
2,220 00 


1,700 66 

1,500 0!) 

2,562 04 

1,095 00 

500 00 

1,500 

395 00 

450 00 

600 00 


1,930 00 


82 Tillsonburg 

83 Trenton 


248 00 
314 56 
50? 60 

" 681 '66 
181 00 
243 00 


2,28?. 00 

2.775 20 


84 Uxbridge 


2,691 32 
1.200 (JO 


86 Walkerton 

87 Wards ville 

88 Waterdown 


3,800 0C 
1,200 00 
1,800 00 

2,134 45 


90 Watford 


454 00 

"* 426*66 

392 85 


2,788 40 


91 Welland 


2,666 66 

520 00 
1,350 00 
2,994 50 


3,050 00 




1,685 00 




2,316 05 




2,577 25 








1 Totals, High Schools 
2 do Collegiate Insts. 


62,227 37 
56,545 45 

118,772 82 
112,650 00 


89,666 82 
59,621 21 


141,248 33 
251,717 56 


35,002 42 
76,025 84 


241,479 56 
330,079 08 


3 Grand totals 1903 

4 do do 1902.... 


149,288 03 
130,124 69 


392 965 94 
384,401 05 


111,028 26 
105,801 01 


876,737 36 
832,853 03 


571,558 64 
547,401 85 


5 Increases 

6 Decreases 


6,122 82 


19.163 34 


8,564 89 


5,227 25 


4,806 03 


43,884 33 


24,156 79 
















7 Percentages 


13.55 


17.03 


44.82 


12.66 


11.94 




70.04 









Cost per pupil, $31.7*2, 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



35 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
Financial Statement. — Concluded. 



Expenditure. 



.2 & 
23 



21 25 
603 50; 



56 

57 

58 

59 1,479 62 

60 

61 

62 

63 

64. 

65. 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70. 

71. 

72. 

73 

74 

75 

76. 

77. 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84. 



159 35 

25 20 

350 00 

369 69 



39 10 

540 00 

8 25 



2 00 

149 95 

305 85 

378 40 

67 20 



243 27 
364 42 



53 00 



235 76 
248 50 
503 08 



Q rA 

g-2 



212 95 

2 40 

162 25 

114 68 

142 41 

VI 21 

28 25 

36 1.4 



467 30 



36 33 
153 07 
65 75 
30 00 
48 26 



3 50 

85 10 

5 25 



<& o >» 






$ c. 

129 72 

6 82 

44 63 

143 10: 

59 00 

6 25 

32 84 

2 00 ; 



64 33 
27 84 
66 80 
66 52 
6 35 
58 16 
164 96 



24 48 

<!85 97 

11 69 

14 50 

228 90 



251 


72 


162 65 


69 97 


64 


33 


5 


90 


97 


14 



23 381 

75 26 



67 25 



25 79 
57 00 
94 34 
22 88 
27 25 
45 96 
35 26 
20 32 



23 81 

' 1*75 



21 88 
68 24 
75 2b 



If 



s"S 



•ft c. 

623 97 

327 13 
761 61 
885 87 

1,079 19 
420 53 

1,410 89 
516 32 

1,439 13 
873 32 

223 52 
381 25 

1,057 49 
379 26 
158 95 
796 53 
669 95 
413 53 
830 00 
778 19 
480 46 
316 01 
615 25 
290 82 
228 62 
485 30 
724 58 
732 58 
400 21 
233 80 
605 57 
4il 91 

224 81 
463 35 
938 88 
6^0 88 
300 40 
445 29 

5,832 67 



$ c. 

3,006 64 
1.758 03 
4,903 49! 
7,039 87 
3,880 60 
2,610 7' 
5,008 48; 
4,900 22 
5,955 81, 
3,874 13 
1,847 20 
2,804 29 
5,932 30 
3,551 85 
1,628 32 

3.112 20 
2,864 91 
2,^99 63 
4,286 721 
4,752 59 
3,955 56 
2,121 23 
2J479 65 
1,756 95 
3^81 68 
2,782 84 
3,422 86 
3,879 14 
3,091 53 
1,744 32! 
4,769 99' 
1,661 51 
2,134 81 
2,693 89 
3,750 16 
3,718 13 
2,289 00 

3.113 34 
9,008 52 



195 26 



Charges per year. 



374 
516 



2,727 

1,109 

6 



185 
"80 



5.00; 8.00. 

Free, H. S. Diet.; others, 10.00. 
H. S. Dist., 9.00; others, 10.00. 
1 7.50. 

Free; Co. and non-res., 10.00. 
6.00; 8.00; 10.00. 
Free. 
Free. 

Free; non-res., 10.00. 
Free. 
Free. 

Res., 6.50; others, 10.00. 
Co., 7.50; town and others, 9.00. 



53 



181 
12 



87 
40 
84 Res., free; non-res., 5.00. 



7.50. 
Free. 



745 

352 

770 

161 

400 

31 

?G? 

295 

517 

388 

51 

214 

648 

1,254 

1,362 

41 

19 

1,269 



Free. 

10.00. 

10.00. 

Free to Co.; non-res., 10.00. 

Res., free; Co., 5.00; others, 10.00. 

Free; Commercial, 5.00; F. IV., 10.00. 

Non-res., 10.00. 

5.00. 

Res., 5.00; non-res., 6.00. 

Free. 

Town, 1st year, free; 6.00. 

Res., free; 10.00. 

Res., 5.00; non-res., 7.50. 

Free. 

10.00. 

Res., 7.50; Co., 10.00; others, 15.00. 

5.00. 

Free. 

Res. and other Cos., 10.00; Co. free. 

Free. 

10.00. 

Town, 6.00; others, 10.00. 

Free. 



1 20.861 87 

2 27.861 72 


8.621 26 
10,345 89 

18,967 15 
11,428 41. 


5,598 12 
4,282 19 


71,635 33 
95,317 05 


348,196 14 
467,885 93 ; 


38,474 62; 45 free; 49 fee. 
22,180 67 j 9 freej 32 fee. 




3 48,723 59 

4 44,246 43 


9,880 31 
9,566 46 

313 85 


166,952 38 
157,036 56 


816,082 07 
769,679 71 

46,402 36 


60,655 29 
63,173 32 


54 free; 81 fee. 
52 free; 82 fee. 

2 free . 
1 fee. 

40 per cent free; 




5 4,477 16 


7.538 74 


9,915 82 






6 


2,518 03 













7 5.97 


2.32 


1.21 


20.46 


| 


60 per cent fee 




1 





6 E. 



a Grant ($50.00) for Cadet Corps included. 



36 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the various 



Collegiate Institutes. 



Pupils and attendance. 



Number of pupils in the various 







"0 






a 


5* 


o 






03 

PI 


CO 

o 


g 


S 






o 


O 



CD Sh 

S-3 



1 Aylmer 

2 Barrie 

3 Brantford 

4 Brockville 

5 Chatham 

6 Clinton 

7 Cobourg 

8 Collingwood 

9 Gait 

10 Goderich 

11 Guelnh 

12 Hamilton 

13 Ingersoll 

14 Kingston 

15 Lindsay 

16 London 

17 Morrisburg 

18 Napanee 

19 Niagara Falls 

20 Orillia 

21 Ottawa 

22 Owen Sound ...&. 

23 Perth 

24 Peterborough 

25 Renfrew 

26 Ridgetown ... 

27 St. Catharines 

28 St. Marys 

29 St. Thomas 

30 Sanaa 

31 Seaforth 

32 Stratford 

33 Strathroy 

34 Toronto (Harbord) 

35 Toronto (Jameson) 

36 Toronto (Jarvis) .. 

37 Toronto Junction . 

38 Vankleekhill 

39 Whitby 

40 Windsor 

41 Woodstock 



Totals .. 



86 
130 
167 
150 
185 
91 
74 
89 
127 
111 
115 
338 
68 
272 
118 
483 
140 
131 
95 
127 
349 
233 
100 
152 
105 
102 
136 
102 
207 
149 
111 
174 
86 
288 
189 
296 
133 
92 
67 
149 
120 



6,437 



94 


180 


124 


254 


236 


403 


152 


302 


241 


426 


88 


179 


82 


156 


128 


217 


134 


261 


151 


262 


161 


276 


450 


788 


• 76 


144 


307 


579 


129 


247 


484 


967 


120 


260 


148 


279 


143 


238 


174 


301 


261 


610 


231 


464 


111 


211 


165 


317 


155 


260 


110 


212 


200 


336 


131 


233 


261 


468 


158 


307 


117 


228 


207 


381 


116 


202 


311 


599 


218 


407 


314 


610 


132 


265 


133 


225 


87 


154 


201 


350 


180 


300 


7,421 


13,858 



108 
154 
238 
175 
241 
110 

91 
127 
148 
156 
166 
448 

78 
335 
137 
563 
164 
172 
134 
184 
372 
280 
141 
216 
155 
114 
185 
143 
295 
189 
134 
223 
129 
368 
247 
277 
150 
125 

99 
200 
185' 



128 
160 
295 
177 

426 



137 
226 
175 
104 
310 
113 
362 
159 
599 
130 
229 
162 
147 
496 
275 
171 
250 
160 
157 
251 
108 
319 
220 
118 
226 
195 
251 
332 
450 
152 
141 
113 
242 
270 



165 
206 
202 
230! 
409 
179 
144 
198 
249 
235 
176 
628 
124 
466 
222 
859 
240 
240 
203 
285 
519 
378 
199 



300 



8,156 9,104 



242 
194 
309 
230 
446 
295 
192 
343 
193 
459 
391 
530 
252 
215 
154 
175 
270 



180 
244 
399 
290 
426 
179 
156 
217 
261 
250 
276 
767 
140 
536 
247 
937 
260 
272 
238 
297 
610 
464 
208 
315 
260 
212 
336 
230 
468 
307 
192 
377 
200 
597 
407 
609 
262 
225 
154 
332 
300 



180 
238 
399 
290 
426 
179 
156 
158 
259 
250 
150 
760 
140 
536 
247 
937 
260 
272 
2318 
300 
610 
464 
209 
315 
260 
212 
332 
233 
468 
307 
192 
378 
198 
597 
407 
604 
262 
225 
154 
131 
300 



11,946 13,637 



13,233 



180 
254 
399 
290 
426 
88 
156 
217| 
259 
250 
276 
760 
140 
536 
247 
937 
260 
272 
238 
250 
610 
464 
209 
315 
260 
212 
332 
233 
468 
307 
118 
378 
200 
597 
384 
595| 
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225 
154 
131 

3oo; 



128 
131 
159 
187 
197 
69 
99 
123 
165 
104 
104 
313 
103 
301 
159 
599 
155 
167 
162! 
161; 
370 
254' 
168 
229 
203 
157 
313 
130 
319 
186 
118 
374 
150 1 
347 
154 
151 
152 
49 
113 
106 
216 



178 
127 
189 
217 
197 

69 
102 
154 
259 

75 
104 
541 
113 
287 
212 
733 
155 
171 
187 
179 
352 
304 
173 
250 
211 
177 
332 
166 
319 
211 
133 
374 
158 
237 
402 
489 
201 
102 
150 
106 
260 



13,189 7,845 9,356 



6a E. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



37 



HIGH SCHOOLS.- Continued. 
subjects and Examination Results. 

branches of instruction. 

























































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251 


309 


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166 


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227 


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149 


256 


446 


358 


315 


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105 


186 


285 


305 


148 


16 


139 


31 


58 


125 


195 


186 


101 


15 


105 


32 


147 


120 


343 


310 


243 


38 


220 


33 


68 


190 


190 


185 


160 


8 


190 


34 


178 


343 


503 


595 


472 


69 


235 


35 


92 


312 


384 


401 


312 


16 


284 


36 


196 


366 


526 


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376 


72 


415 


37 


94 


191 


248 


260 


111 


17 


125 


38 


84 


96 


215 


225 


175 


10 


124 


39 


64 


90 


144 


154 


154 


12 


60 


40 


62 


164 


314 


191 


137 


12 


108 


41 


82 


120 


270 


300 


210 


14 


140 




3 


104 


23 


128 


2 


136 


25 


88 


15 


242 


64 


195 


10 


205 


64 


117 


35 


233 


34 


116 


18 


135 


35 


60 




1121 


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99 




56 


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109 


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156 


60 


178 


4 


149 


30 


104 


1 


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63 


56 


13 


435 


241 


246 


1 


99 


6 


88 


8 


416 


142 


126 


8 


127 


23 


109 


19 


455 


58 


403 


12 


175 


25 


119 


4 


217 


26 


53 


3 


122 


14 


107 


4 


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56 


133 


29 


415 


81 


207 


15 


324 


15 


142 


16 


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17 


62 


5 


185 


20 


172 


6 


193 


25 


107 


5 


54 


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131 


8 


201 


92 


199 


6 


161 


38 


85 




159 


35 


153 


15 


132 


19 


186 


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21 


122 


5 


128 


95 


129 


3 


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49 


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189 


222 


19 


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80 


203 


31 


549 


135 


323 


6 


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38 


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12 


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4,881 8,030 12,225 12 , 363 8 ,915 1 , 022 7,339 

1 1 t I 



9,536 



4008,445 2,070 5,712 



38 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the various 



Collegiate Institute . 



Number of pupils in the various branches of 
instruction . — Continued . 



II 
So 
a> as 

M g 

W 



EXAMINA- 






a; s 

aj X 

Is 



1 Aylmer 

2 Barrie 

3 Brantford 

4 Brockville 

5 Chatham 

6 Clinton 

7 Cobourg 

8 Collingwood 

9 Gait 

10 Goderich 

11 Guelph 

12 Hamilton 

13 Ingersoll 

14 Kingston 

15 Lindsay 

16 London 

17 Morrisburg 

18 Napanee 

19 Niagara Falls 

20 Orillia 

21 Ottawa 

22 Owen Sound 

23 Perth 

24 Peterborough 

25 Renfrew 

26 Ridgetown 

27 St. Catharines 

28 St. Marys 

29 St. Thomas 

30 Sarnia 

31 Seaforth 

32 Stratford 

33 Strathroy 

34 Toronto (Harbord) 

35 Toronto (Jameson) 

36 Toronto (Jarvis) ... 

37 Toronto Junction . 

38 Vankleekhill 

39 Whitby 

40 Windsor 

41 Woodstock 

Totals 



128 

92 






128 

85 


64 


64 


189 


106 


53 


220 


117 


33 


33 


117 


236 


116 


116 


120 


85 


36 


31 


85 


99 


56 


72 


39 


104 


49 


49 


139 


156 


75 


63 


110 


121 


64 


9 


124 


126 


78 


71 


56 


255 


80 


25 


245 


88 


34 


1 16 


82 


203 


104 


107 


67 


109 


24 


24 


109 


403 


140 


55 


378 


75 


50 


25 


119 


160 


82 


50 


153 


158 


77 


46 


82 


133 


52 


74 


84 


370 


67 




370 


220 


37 


35 


215 


83 
190 






145 
187 


57 


7 


97 


62 


47 


60 


101 


59 


56 


42 


199 


119 


32 


142 


102 


34 


7 


84 


153 


110 


55 


98 


186 


109 


55 


152 


130 


25 


28 


116 


166 


80 


53 


173 


75 


40 


28 


75 


380 


136 


68 


344 


196 


97 


22 


198 


165 


102 


70 


365 


159 


46 


62 


159 


59 


28 


28 


49 


84 


68 


12 


90 


168 


90 


98 


207 


112 


52 


48 


120 


6,432 


2,738 


1,792 


5,933 



162 
231 
345 



185 



400 
154 
153 
209 
244 
230 
275 
680 
137 



75 



608 



114 



240 
940 
232 
277 
213 
237 
571 
302 
200 
300 
101 
200 
333 
218 
446 
290 
220 



332 



57 



31 



249 



190 
549 
342 
565 



210 
140 
330 
240 



43 



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11,106! 100 



1,676 



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11 
13 
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10 
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16 

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9 
16 
12 

9 

4 
17 
16 
16 
18 
16 
13 

12 

U 

13 

11 

5 

6 

18 



516 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



39 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
subjects and Examination Results. 



-Concluded. 



TION RESULTS. 





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40 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the various 



Pupils and attendance. 



High Schools. 



Number of pupils in the 



1 Alexandria 

2 Almonte 

3 Arnprior 

4 Arthur 

5 Athens 

6 Aurora 

7 Beamsville 

8 Belleville 

9 Berlin 

10 Bowmanville 

11 Bradford 

12 Brampton 

13 Brighton 

14 Caledonia 

15 Campbellford 

16 Carleton Place 

17 Cayuga 

18 Colborne 

19 Cornwall 

20 Deseronto 

21 Dundas 

22 Dunnville 

23 Dutton 

24 East Toronto 

25 Elora 

26 Essex 

27 Fergus 

28 Forest 

29 Fort William 

30 Gananoque 

31 Georgetown 

32 Glencoe 

33 Gravenhurst 

34 Grimsby 

35 Hagersville 

36 Harriston 

37 Hawkesbury 

38 Iroquois 

39 Xemptville 

40 Kincardine 

41 Leamington 

42 Listowel 

45 Lucan 

44 Madoc 

45 Markham 

46 Meaford 

47 Mitchell 

48 Mount Forest 

49 Newburgh 

50 Newcastle 

51 Newmarket 

5 ! Niagara 

53 Niagara Falls South 

54 North Bay 

55 Norwood 



70 
62 
52 
59 
69 
55 
36 

120 

103 
56 
66 
98 
35 
51 
69 
74 
46 
35 

123 
44 
80 
72 

101 
24 
44 
57 
61 
61 
23 
56 
58 
55 
35 
19 
54 
81 
34 

106 
76 
77 
81 
67 
40 

127 
72 
66 
95 
76 
20 
60 
18 
35 
35 
67 



71 
57 
86 
60 

110 
56 
38 

150 

113 
68 
60 
80 
39 
62 
83 
93 
46 
32 

140 
71 
59 
69 

102 
18 
50 
81 
78 
71 
43 
86 
71 
43 
46 
42 
50 
65 
41 
79 
126 
96 
76 
71 
78 
54 
81 
78 
77 
84 
68 
31 
82 
29 
45 
53 
68 



141 

119 

138 

119 

179 

111 

74 

270 

216 

124 

126 

178 

74 

113 

152 

167 

92 

67 

263 

115 

139 

141 

203 

42 

94 

138 

•139 

132 

66 

142 

129 

98 

81 

61 

104 

146 

75 

157 

232 

172 

153 

152 

145 

94 

208 

150 

143 

179 

144 

51 

142 

47 

80 

88 

135 



84 
70 
78 
72 

118 
66 
39 

149 

125 
77 
71 

118 
4.2 
76 
88 

101 
52 
38 

161 
72 
80 
79 

127 
36 
60 
83 
72 
85 
34 
86 
68 
57 
36 
35 
62 
81 
49 

102 

153 

103 
83 
95 
93 
53 
120 
90 
91 
103 
82 
37 
80 
22 
38 
52 
77 



141 

95 

138 

79 

128 

111 

68 

265 

161 

99 

91 

118 

4 

64 

89 

126 

64 

43 

263 

86 

139 

99 

94 

32 

68 

98 

74 

85 

53 

90 

89 

62 

51 

47 

71 

69 

48 

119 

154 

134 

88 

117 

145 

46 

108 

81 

109 

126 

144 

22 

93 

29 

66 

62 

135 



141 

108 

138 

115 

172 

104 

74 

270 

210 

113 

123 

143 

74 

106 

148 

158 

87 

67 

263 

115 

128 

138 

190 

42 

86 

124 

117 

119 

63 

136 

122 

95 

81 

61 

98 

126 

61 

144 

220 

167 

133 

149 

131 

94 

160 

124 

143 

169 

142 

45 

1 

44 

78 

80 

130 



141 

117j 
138 
119 
177 
111 

74 1 
2G5 
210 
123 
126 
178 

74 
113 
152 
165 



263 

115 

139 

141 

190 

42 

94 

135 

139 

125J 

65 

142 

129 

96 

81 

61 

104 

146 

74 

157 

232 

172 

150 

152 

145 

94 

191 

146 

143 

179 

144 

51 

142 

44 

78 

88 

130 



141 

114 

138 

119 

177 

111 

74 

265 

210 

123 

126 

178 

74 

113 

152 

166 

87 

67 

263 

115 

139 

141 

190 

42 

94 

135 

139 

125 

26 

142 

129 

97 

81 

61 

104 

146 

75 

154 

232 

172 

150 

152 

145 

94 

191 

146 

143 

179 

144 

51 

142 

45 



130 



1901 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



41 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

subjects and Examination Results. — Continued, 



various branches of instruction. 





























rt 










3 






































bo 

£ 










v. 

o 
















o 




£? 




'C 














t-' 




o 


o •> 


















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a; 3 






S 


>> 


p 




^ 


a 




>> 




a s 

15 


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a 


A 


® 


ft 


CD 
3 

B 




a 


o 
o 

80 


BE 


-j. 

a 




ga 


Bj 


~bh 


o 


o 

0> 


■2 


bo 


o 


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X 


O 


w 


< 


CS 


< 


< 


O 


H 


Ph 


5 


1 


141 


121 


121 


31 


121 


141 


141 


66 




66 


66 


2 


114 


95 


95 


31 


95 


110 


118 


54 


4 


51 


20 


3 


138 


97 


97 


37 


97 


134 


134 


134 




78 


41 


4 


119 


79 


83 


40 


79 


116 


119 


• 119 


4 


71 


40 


5 


177 


64 


64 


136 


64 


172 


179 


170 


3 


136 


107 


6 


111 


75 


75 


43 


68 


104 


104 


75 


7 


75 


30 


7 


74 


69 


69 


9 


69 


74 


74 


36 




37 


9 


8 


265 


198 


200 


72 


114 


210 


255 


142 


io 


135 


106 


9 


210 


120 


176 


61 


161 


204 


210 


170 


n 


116 


38 


10 


123 


99 


109 


24 


99 


107 


122 


59 


12 


60 


10 


11 


126 


91 


96 


47 


59 


123 


126 


92 


5 


80 


26 


12 


178 


143 


143 


39 


118 


143 


170 


127 


17 


80 


39- 


13 


74 


48 


48 


26 


48 


74 


74 


51 




49 


26 


14 


64 


64 


69 


49 


64 


104 


113 


79 


5 


75 


28 


15 


100 


105 


110 


46 


105 


148 


146 


79 


5 


78 


64 


16 


126 


28 


103 


34 


98 


158 


165 


115 


7 


66 


9 


17 


87 


64 


64 


23 


64 


83 


83 


38 




41 


14 


18 


43 


43 


43 


24 


28 


67 


67 


43 




43 


24 


19 


221 


192 


70 


65 


191 


250 


201 


128 


"9 


122 


14 


20 


86 


86 


89 


47 


86 


115 


114 


68 


4 


64 


18 


21 


139 


111 


111 


41 


111 


139 


139 


73 




73 


25 


22 


141 


99 


131 


39 


99 


138 


139 


139 


2 


56 


18 


23 


169 


94 


102 


85 


94 


169 


203 


163 


34 


203 


163 


24 


42 


32 


32 


10 


21 


42 


42 


42 




21 


10 


25 


94 


24 


71 


36 


68 


90 


94 


73 


' '4 


94 


35 


26 


97 


96 


96 


52 


94 


124 


137 


81 


11 


13 


10 


27 


139 


74 


74 


65 


74 


117 


139 


139 


6 


100 


39 


28 


58 


78 


78 


53 


78 


122 


129 


104 


5 


100 


39 


29 


40 


53 


54 


11 


53 


63 


65 


65 


2 


18 


9 


30 


142 


90 


90 


52 


90 


140 


L41 


90 




72 


47 


31 


129 


89 


95 


46 


66 


122 


128 


85 


8 


85 


42 


32 


97 


61 


68 


42 


61 


91 


96 


95 


7 


58 


31 


33 


SI 


5 5 


55 


30 


51 


81 


75 


44 




32 


32 


34 


61 


47 


47 


14 


47 


61 


61 


37 




37 


3 


35 


104 


71 


75 


35 


71 


98 


104 


60 


3 


35 


23 


36 


146 


68 


88 


78 


68 


120 


145 


.144 


20 


146 


40 


37 


4S 


62 


63 


26 


51 


65 


74 


39 


13 


37 


15 


38 


154 


110 


110 


47 


110 


144 


155 


92 


16 


92 


38 


39 


220 


154 


178 


108 


154 


220 


232 


182 


24 


182 


70 


40 


172 


90 


83 


65 


90 


167 


134 


134 


9 


114 


28 


41 


150 


88 


98 


62 


76 


133 


150 


100 


10 


82 


50 


42 


152 


117 


117 


71 


117 


149 


152 


152 


9 


65 


55 


43 


145 


98 


114 


45 


66 


130 


145 


145 


21 


113 


78 


44 


69 


46 


46 


74 


46 


94 


94 


46 




36 


16 


45 


191 


168 


180 


82 


108 


178 


208 


191 


is 


138 


82 


46 


81 


82 


82' 


44 


81 


126 


144 


143 


18 


101 


32 


47 


143 


109 


109 


53 


107 


143 


143 


143 




94 


42 


48 


179 


126 


179 


74 


126 


159 


179 


179 


"iz 


112 


61 


49 


144 


59 


59 


66 


76 


144 


144 


144 




85 


30 


50 


' 22 


22 


22 


30 


22 


45 


47 


40 




19 


5 


51 


142 


93 


113 


47 


57 


140 


135 


82 




76 


42 


5 2 


31 


15 


29 


20 


29 


45 


45 


19 




22 


4 


53 


78 


66 


66 


19 


66 


78 


78 


78 


' 'i 


45 


20 


54 


88 


62 


62 


26 


62! 


8 


85 


S5 


3 


8S 


26 


55 


130 


80 


80 


55 


133 


130 


130 


100 





93 


36 



42 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, pupils in the various 



High Schools. 



Number of pupils in the various branches of instruc- 



g 

a 
8 

Xi 
rig 

"3Ǥ 



Rh 



1 Alexandria 

2 Almonte 

3 Arnprior 

4 Arthur 

5 Athens ., 

6 Aurora 

7 Beamsville 

8 Belleville 

9 Berlin 

10 Bowmanville 

11 Bradford 

12 Brampton 

13 Brighton 

14 Caledonia 

15 Campbellford 

16 Carleton Place 

17 Cayuga 

18 Colborne 

19 Cornwall 

20 Deseronto 

21 Dundas 

22 Dunnville 

23 Dutton 

24 East Toronto 

25 Elora 

26 Essex 

27 Fergus 

28 Forest 

?9 Fort William 

30 Gananoque 

31 Georgetown 

52 Glencoe ' 

33 Gravenhurst 

34 Grimsby 

35 Hagersville 

36 Harriston 

37 Hawkesbury 

38 Iroquois 

39 Kemptville 

40 Kincardine 

41 Leamington 

42 Listowel 

43 Lucan 

44 Madoc 

45 Markham 

46 Meaford 

47 Mitchell 

48 Mount Forest 

49 Newburgh 

50 Newcastle 

51 Newmarket 

52 Niagara 

53 Niagara Falls South- 

54 North Bay 

55 Norwood 



110 
65 
60 
48 
64 
36 
50 

161 
86 
63 
59 
90 
23 
34 
65 

100 
36 
24 
73 
60 
83 
51 
46 
18 
68 
93 
33 
60 
40 
42 
66 
41 
51 
20 
39 
40 
41 

127 
80 
34 
40 
74 
42 
22 
54 
43 
72 

110 
78 
22 
57 

*45 

"58 


2 

"io 

"ii 

2 

"io 

l 

4 
3 

3 



136 

89 

125 

119 

176 

90 

42 

163 

93 

113 

103 

156 

49 

103 

88 

105 

62 

60 

195 

64 

115 

99 

198 

38 

92 

122 

104 

128 

60 

68 

112 

91 

49 

32 

73 

118 

59 

115 

202 

132 

112 

137 

135 

80 

191 

143 

89 

164 

.104 

29 

105 

42 

54 

73 

120 


4 

1 

..... 

2 

4 
3 

*"i2 

2 

*' '24 
1 
2 

3 
1 

7 
1 
1 

'"io 

8 
5 
3 
3 
"2 



136 
58 
50 
30 

102 
75 
26 

161 
30 
85 
76 

110 
35 
53 
37 
85 
39 
21 

208 
37 

105 
50 
26 
32 
40 
65 
69 
92 
53 
76 
36 
64 
23 
30 
46 
50 
74 
68 

115 

122 
86 
42 
14 
50 

145 
82 
72 
78 
60 
30 
72 
21 
18 
51 
80 



18 

130 

8 

3 



106 

79 

21 

5 

32 



110 
71 
60 
48 

114 
36 
50 

161 
87 
63 
59 
82 

.23 
54 

103 
50 
64 
24 

176 
86 
83 
83 
40 
21 
18 
91 
33 
60 
40 



41 
51 
42 
31 
39 
43 
89 
80 
90 
46 
62 
66 
22 
52 
40 
72 
105 
78 
22 
57 
29 
45 
62 
75 



no 






71 
60 


32 


19 


75 






64 






68 
50 


40 


30 


161 






87 
63 
91 
82 
?3 


37 
32 
59 

28 


33 

"'30 


54 






103 

48 


21 




56 
?9 


33 


24 


120 
86 


55 


57 


83 
65 
41 


20 
31 


20 


26 
28 
91 
33 






60 






40 
83 


31 




66 






41 






51 
4?, 


29 




39 






45 
41 


45 


40 


89 

80 


24 




83 

57 


37 


36 


62 






66 


20 


10 


52 
61 

72 


70 
30 


.12 
15 


105 






78 
2? 


59 




69 
31 
66 
62 
70 


69 
21 
31 
50 


42 
28 
18 










110 
64 
60 
75 

127 
68 
50 

150 
64 
63 
59 
82 
23 
54 

103 
98 
36 
24 

123 
86 
83 
99 
40 
21 
48 
91 
33 
60 
36 
83 
66 
41 
51 
41 
39 
50 
43 
89 
80 
85 
46 
62 
66 
22 
70 
40 
70 

105 
78 
22 
62 
29 
45 
40 
60 



192 



15 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



43 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

subjects, and Examination Results. — Continued, 



tion- Con. 


EXAMINATION RESULTS. 




a 

_ep 
53 aj 

•** 2 

ss 

32 
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S o 

A 


a 

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cp '3 

o s 

a g 

be « 


3 
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op 

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S 

op 

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03 

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CJD 

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t-. 
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1-8 

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co 2 

co cS 

ss * 

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CO 

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o 

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o 
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o 

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cp o 

Is 


3 . 
m |— ' 

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SI 

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a? X 

£g 

op O 
■23 

§s 


OX 

a 

s 
hJ 

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CO 

a a 

o3 X 

a w 

cp 1-1 

II 


a 

CO 

>> 

£2 

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cp 

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O 

o 
W 

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cp« 

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la 


> 

a 

CD 

u 

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x o3 
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a w 

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aft 


u 
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£ 

2 

o 
o 
o 
W 

o . 

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CPrt 

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1 

03 

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r-l 03 

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CP pj 
5.° 

is 
Hi 


5 " 

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l£ 

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IS 

la 

c3 X 

S5 


cd ct 

lei 

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MH CP 

O PI s 
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C^2 

PI r- 

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a^ . 

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^ = g 

o.2s 

Cp 05 +3 

^5 03 

043*3 

a Jh CP 


2s 

o cp 
a5 pi 

CO o 

co'£ 

a a 

CP S 

!» o3 k " 

III 


at; 

CD rn 

§sl 

W 03 S 
CD^ A 

.P!~ >» 
co o O 

53 o| 

q o3 cp 

1.3 a 

S5 


1 








7 
7 
7 
7 

29 
2 
5 

11 
7 
5 
7 
9 
8 

10 

12 

12 
5 
3 

11 
8 

10 
4 

18 


1 


1 












5 
7 












a 










7 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


7 


1 




1 


3 












4 


119 J 
85. 


2 . . . . 










2 










i 






3 




5 






1 












13 

2 


1 
3 




1 


fi 












1 
1 
4 
3 
6 




1 


1 


5 




1 


7 














8 
















2 
1 
1 


2 


9 

7 


l 






2 


2 


3 


28.' . 


. *106 














10 








6 


7 


2 




1 


11 




. 59 












4 
11 


Ifl 








3 




3 




1 
2 


4 


10 






13 


... 2 


3 






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14 








4 








3 
3 
3 










If. 






























1fi 














2 




2 
3 







4 








17 




















18 




















1 
1 
2 
5 
1 
4 












19 


192. . 












1 




3 










2 


1 


an 


86. . 


















81 


139. . 




















1 










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138. . 












1 
9 
















23 








1 








1 






9 


10 






24 
















as 








7 

6 

8 

12 

3 

5 

11 

5 

5 

2 

7 

9 

4 

12 

24 

17 

10 

9 

8 

6 

8 

16 

10 

17 

6 

2 

7 

2 

2 

2 

14 








4 
2 
4 


2 


1 


3 


1 
5 
5 

1 
2 
4 

2 




1 


4 






26 


129. . 


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2 




27 










2 
1 




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5 






28 




















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7 














1 






an 




















2 








31 








1 






3 

1 




2 
1 












3-' 






















33 


81. . 




4 






















34 




















1 












to 














3 
3 
4 
2 
6 
1 
3 
1 
4 


















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.... 


2 
4 

4 
4 






1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


37 








1 








2 

6 
6 

2 
3 
1 
2 
7 
9 
6 
2 


38 












2 


7 


9 






39 


















4 


165. . 






1 




8 












41 








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1 

1 
2 














42 


149. . 






1 
















4 3 


130. . 










1 










44 
























45 


101. . 












3 

4 




"*2 :::: 




1 








4R 


81. . 








3 


2 


2 






1 


1 
1 

1 


47 


143. . 












48 


95. . 






1 






2 


.... 


3 












49 




















50 


*42i ; 


















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3 












51 
























52 
































53 


21. . 














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88. . 














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1 


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50. . 




















5 









































*In Manual Training and Household Science. 



44 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils m the various 



High Schools. 



Pupils and attendance. 



56 Oakville 

57 Omemee 

58 Orangeville 

59 Oshawa 

60 Paris 

61 Parkhill 

62 Pembroke 

63 Petrolea 

64 Picton 

65 Port Arthur 

66 Port Dover 

67 Port Elgin 

68 Port Hope 

69 Port Perry 

70 Port Rowan 

71 Prescott 

72 Eat Portage 

73 Richmond Hill .. 

74 Sault Ste. Marie 

75 Simcoe 

76 Smith's Falls 

77 Smithville 

78 Stirling 

79 Streets ville 

80 Sydenham 

SI Thorold 

82 Tillsonburg 

83 Trenton 

?A Tlxbridge 

85 Vienna 

86 Walkerton 

87 Wardsville 

88 "Waterdown 

99 Water ford 

90 "Watford 

91 Welland 

92 Weston 

93 Wiarton 

'A Wiiliamstown 



1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes 



Z Grand totals, 1903 
4 Grand totals, 1902 



38 
23 

105 
89 
64 
73 
92 
77 

104 
25 
38 
59 

104 
55 
26 
38 
45 
51 
41 
77 
57 
41 
32 
28 
64 
20 
46 
67 
53 
12 
88 
18 
43 
58 
80 
70 
28 
44 
44 



5,551 
6,437 



46 
29 

112 
85 
59 
69 
64 

109 

122 
47 
41 
35 

116 
45 
22 
50 
40 
32 
87 
80 

127 
54 
37 
26 
89 
65 
67 
70 
80 
24 
77 
24 
45 
55 
96 

132 
43 
54 
52 



6,313 

7,421 



84 

52 

217 

174 

123 

142 

15 

18 

226 

72 

79 

94 

220 

100 

48 

88 

85 

83 

128 

157 

184 

95 

69 

54 

153 

85 

113 

137 

133 

36 

165 

42 

88 

113 

176 

202 

71 

98 

96 



11,864 
13,858 



11,988 13,734 
11,629 12,843 



5 Increases 

6 Decreases 



359 



7 Percentages 



46.6 



891 



53.4 



25,722 
24,472 



1,250 



47 

43 

124 

108 

72 

92 

95 

102 

139 

43 

48 

54 

135 

186 

24 

50 

48 

53 

66 

90 

118 

56 

43 

32 

88 

65 

59 

67 

80 

17 

93 

21 

53 

70 

113 

115 

40 

53 

58 



7,161 
8,156 



15,317 
14,430 



887 



59.55 



Number of pupils in the 



o 












o 








a> 




A 




ri 




xi 




£ 


c 


oj 


o 


Si 

3 




a- 


o 


s 






o 


O 


O 


r$ 


A 














be 


6fi 










W 


H 



72 

38 

117 

121 

93 

75 

95 

142 

179 

72 

45 

70 

97 

92 

28 

60 

59 

40 

101 

66 

171 

56 

33 

39 

96 

85 

77 

90 

93 

36 

91 

34 

88 

101 

101 

92 

51 

57 

49 



8,426 
9,104 



17,530 
16,541 



84 

52 

195 

163 

105 

125 

141 

179 

216 

72 

79 

88 

200 

92 

48 

81 

75 

65 

119 

157 

171 

91 

61 

54 

153 

81 

104 

132 

120 

36 

143 

40 

88 

108 

163 

190 

53 

98 

96 



11,123 
11,946 



23,069 

21,576 



9 8 : 



68.11 



1,493 



84 

52 

212 

174| 

123 

142! 

156 

179 

225 

721 

79 

94 

220 

100 

48 

88 

85 

65 

128 

157 

184 

95 

69 

54 

153 

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133 

36 

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98 

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79 

52 

214 

174 

123 

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156 

179 

225 

72 

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220 

100 

48 

84 

85 

65 

128 

157 

184 

95 

69 

23 

153 

85 

113 

137 

133 

36 

160 

42 

88 

110 

172 

201 

67 



11,738 
13,637 



11,652 
13,233 



25,375 
24,241! 



24,885 
23,768 



1,134 1,117 



89.64 98.65 96.74 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



45 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued 

subjects, and Examination Results. — Continued. 



various branches of instruction. 





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24 


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36 




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91 




37 


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91 


138 


160 


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39 


87 


25 




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34 


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34 


40 


42 


38 




28 


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70 


70 


40 


44 


84 


88 


88 


4 


60 


15 


89 


110 




97 


100 


37 


65 


106 


110 


77 


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76 


22 


90 


107 




56 


64 


115 


56 


163 


172 


116 


8 


120 


81 


91 


138 




129 


140 


60 


112 


190 


201 


171 


14 


132 


52 


92 


68 




51 


51 


19 


52 


67 


51 


39 


3 


27 


14 


93 


98 




57 


57 


41 


57 


93 


98 


98 


5 


65 


33 


94 


96 
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44 


36 


27 


82 


96 


96 


52 




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8,138 


4,306 


7,260 


11,021 


11,477 


% 8,958 


596 


6,901 


3,192 


2 


13,189 

23,864 


7 


845 


9,356 


4,881 


8,030 


12,225 


12,363 


8,915 


1,022 


7,339 


3,022 


3 


"i7 


239 


17,494 


9,187 


15,290 


23,246 


23,840 


17,873 


1,618 


1 14,240 


6,214 


4 


22,932 
932 


14 


768 


16,817 


8,791 


14,500 


21,594 


22,953 


16,881 


1,662 


12,758 


5,860 


5 




471 


677 


396 


790 


1,652 


887 


992 




1, 132 


354 


6 




















44 








92.77 












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1 




7 


59.24 


68.01 


35.71 


59.44 


90.37 


92.68 


69.48 


6.29 


55.36 


24.16 



46 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the various 



High Schools. 



Number of pupils in the various branches of instruc- 



s 

a 

o 
O 

T) 

$$ 

M g 
PQ 



56 Oakville 

57 Omemee 

58 Orangeville 

59 Oshawa 

60 Paris 

61 Parkhill 

62 Pembroke 

63 Petrolea 

64 Picton 

65 Port Arthur 

66 Port Dover 

67 Port Elgin 

68 Port Hope 

69 Port Perry 

70 Port Rowan 

71 Prescott 

72 Rat Portage 

73 Richmond Hill 

74 Sault Ste. Marie 

75 Simcoe 

76 Smith's Palls 

77 Smithville 

78 Stirling 

79 Streetsville 

80 Sydenham 

81 Thorold 

82 Tillsonburg 

83 Trenton 

84 Uxbridge 

85 Vienna 

86 Walkerton 

87 Wardsville 

88 Waterdown 

89 Waterford 

90 Watford 

91 Welland 

92 Weston 

93 Wiarton 

94 Williamstown 



1 Totals, High Schools.. 

2 Totals, Col. Institutes 

3 Grand totals, 1903 ... 

4 Grand totals, 1902 ... 

5 Increases 

6 Decreases 

7 Percentages 



40 




"86 


4 


111 


2 


60 


1 


33 


1 


74 




98 


4 


58 




64 




29 




51 




67 




21 




28 




24 




59 




22 




63 




40 




131 




46 




20 


4 


35 




96 




25 




53 




73 




47 




15 




41 




14 




23 




65 




56 




48 




38 




33 




43 




5,027 


69 


4,415 


229 



41 

45 

152 

118 

78 

135 

125 

158 

164 

67 

78 

84 

184 

65 

13 

60 

65 

53 

116 

•70 

170 

79 

33 

54 

141 

65 

53 

114 

78 

34 

130 

38 

80 

103 

165 

193 

44 

43 

91 



9,295 
9,536 



9,442 
9,051 



36.71 



298 18,831 



365 



G7 



1.16 



18,884 



53 



73.21 



202 
400 



602 
631 



29 



2.34 



24 
19 

125 
73 
40 
65 
96 
94 

151 
67 
19 
37 

124 
64 
15 
38 
60 
43 

118 
60 

141 
24 
25 
31 

143 
35 
49 
66 
78 
4 
58 
8 
78 
52 
91 

162 
25 
12 
72 



37 



6,077 
8,445 



14,522 
13,595 



927 



56.46 



42 
19 
82 

121 
62 
60 
74 
98 
91 
28 
29 
51 
67 
72 
28 
31 
59 
22 
63 
60 

131 
56 
33 
23 
53 
50 
53 
88 
47 
24 
54 
25 
23 
65 
56 
33 
39 
51 
43 



l,159j 5,584 
2,070 5,712 



3,229 
3,280 



51 



12.55 



11,296 
10,059 



1,237 



43.91 



50 
19 
82 

121 
79 
60 
74 
98 
82 
64 
29 
51 

121 
72 
28 
51 
59 
40 

100 
60 

131 
40 
16 
35 
73 
50 
53 
88 
47 
24 
54 
25 
28 
65 
56 
69 
39 
33 
43 



14 



5,832 
6,432 



12,264 
11,334 



930 



47.68 



6 5 



16 



14 



2:> 



50 



43 
19 

82 
121 
61 
60 
74 
98 
82 
64 
29 
51 
67 
72 
28 
31 
59 
40 
63 
60 
131 
36 
33 
35 
73 
50 
53 
88 
47 
24 
54 
25 
23 
68 
56 
57 
38 
33 
43 



4,347 
3,727 



620 



16-9 



2,654 
2,044 



610 



10.31 



SU 



1,609 802 5,6861 287 
2,738 1,792 5,933 ! 



11,619! 287 
10,7211 138 



898! 149 



45.17 1.11 



19(14 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

subjects and Examination Results. — Concluded. 



tion. —Con. 


EXAMINATION RESULTS. 




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87 














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90 












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91 


















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93 

94 










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3 















































1 
2 


2,533 
11,106 


55 

100 


255 

1,676 


17 
11 


754 
516 


16 

8 


3 
9 


17 
129 


134 

227 


3 
10 


79 
139 


7 
3 


286 
403 


41 
80 


78 
194 


Z 9 
189 


26 


19 
65 


3 

4 


13,639 
12,767 


155 

240 


1,931 
960 


28 


1,270 
1,467 


24 
29 


12 
26 


146 
92 


361 
316 


13 
14 


218 

245 


10 
23 


689 

850 


121 

191 


272 
350 


268 
266 


41 
30 


84 
77 


5 


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54 


45 














2 


11 


7 


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197 


5 


14 


1 


27 


13 


161 


70 


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53.02 


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7.5 


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4.93 


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1.4 


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2.68 


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1.05 


1.04 


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48 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. — Table K— Miscellaneous 





0> 

00 






EQUIPMENT. 


Religious and 
other Exercises. 






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641 

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1,147 


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636 


24 


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599 


80 


804 


121 


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700 


118 


679 


75 


25 






100 


1 


1 


i 


i 




15 Lindsay 


B. 


?, 


1 


1,180 


107 


1,096 


95 


10 


600 


126 


46 




1 




i 




B 


3 
1 


1 
1 


879 
657 




2,809 
1,265 


173 
167 


45 
17 


* 


348 


700 




1 








17 Morrisburg 


B. 


' 32 


980 


188 


200 


1 


1 






1 


18 Napanee 


B. 


31 

5| 

2 

1 


1 


776 


74 


931 


126 




800 


251 




1 


1 




i 


1 




B 




657 
579 


78 
29 


622 


87 
110 




1 063 


118 






1 




! 




20 Orillia 


R 




768 


68 


1,800 


278 






1 




1 




21 Ottawa 


S. 




1,260 


90 


1,518 


281 


150 


2,040 


184 


100 


1 


1 


l 


1 


1 


22 Owen Sound 


B. 


1 


1 


1,329 


68 


1,798 


122 


20 




25 


50 




1 


i 




1 


23 Perth 


B. 


4 


1 


729 


33 


821 


155 


10 


560 


267 


500 


1 


1 






1 


24 Peterborough 

25 Renfrew 


B 


21 
3 

1 s 


1 

1 


613 
435 
605 


155 
10 

10 


886 

581 

1,094 


149 

70 
143 


25 


600 


160 






1 


i 






B. 
B. 


12 

47 
















1 


26 Ridgetown 


900 


90 


10 




1 


l 




1 


27 St. Catharines ... 


B. 


1 
ft 




631 




815 


133 


18 


700 


75 


20 


i 


1 






1 


28 St. Marys s- 


B. 




654 


52 


662 


120 


25 


700 


84 




l 


1 






1 


29 St Thomas 


B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 


21 
21 


1 
1 


815 
720 
762 
961 


55 


916 

716 

753 

1,154 


110 
127 
138 

219 


18 


983 


374 






1 










12 


1 380 


168 






1 






1 


31 Seaforth 

32 Stratford 






600 


66 




i 


1 








^ 






26 


112 




l 


1 






1 




B. 
B. 
B. 


11 
11 
11 

n 

3 

!» 

2 




730 

986 
1,440 


195 
213 

192 


905 


114 


29 


380 


102 




1 


1 




i 


1 


34 Toronto (Harb'd) 




2,099 
2,293 


175 


?8 


4 000 


710 






1 






1 


35 Toronto (Jame'n) 




155 


15 


4,000 


790 




l 


1 




i 


1 


36 Toronto (Jarvis). 

37 Toronto (Junction 


B. 
B. 
B 




1,336 
743 




1 1,210 
879 
726 
546 

974 


201 


3 C 


8 257 


218 






1 


i 


i 


1 




' 'ii 


107 
46 


32 
3 








l 


1 

1 






1 


38 Vankleekhill 


3 000 


236 




1 


39 Whitby 


B 


3 


631 

874 ! 


115 
14C 


16 


'850 


209 






1 




i 


1 


40 "Windsor 


B. 


3i" 


3,000 


200 


300 










1 


41 Woodstock 


B. 


1 




986 


77 


1,566 


161 


IE 


2,000 


174 


80 


l 


1 






i 


Totals 




98 


1 


5 32,940 


1,994 


43,045 


) 5,414 


881 

1 


l 51,672 


8,650 


2,608 


20 


39 


9 


12 


29 



*G ymnash m is part of the main building . fH6 pupils in commercial form . |59 pupils in commer- 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



49 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
information. 



Number of pupils in 


Number of pupils 
from 


Destination of pupi 


Is. 


Occupation of parents of each 
pupil. 












A 

bo 






43 


g 


8f 




6 


% 






















s 


>» 




o> 


^ 


%% 




u 

























43 

Xi 
bo 

a 


a 

3 

s 

43 
A 




a 

43 
43 






£A 

8° 

fc< 43 

<g a 

a "9 

O 43 


e 

43 

a 



Xi 
O 

3 


9 

4> 
A 






33 




\ 












o 

S 

=3 S 


a 

03 

.2 


of 

3 



T3 
0J 

V 

O 
A 


a> 

a 

O 
O) 
.Q 

A 3 


43 

a 

at 

43 

43 
Xi 

O 
Xi 


T3 

43 

Fh 
43 

*J 

43 
O 


Fh 

O 

O 
a 


43 


u 

3 




I 



dj 




03 


a 



ca 


8 




a 

o 


a 

u 
o 




a 

o 


> 

a 

o 


5o 
3 

3 00 


a 




43 


N 

43 

Xi 

B 


8 

"5 bo 


F-" & 

AJ2 

=3 


43 

X 

a 

3 


4; O 

as 


E -2 


F-i 

43 

a 

a 



3 
43 
f 

to 


5 

A 

43 


■/. 

43 









e 


• 


£ 


fa 


s 


3 




fc 


£ 


& 


fc 


5 


2^ 





< 


s 


CH 


S 


1 


46 


61 


57 


16 


73 


107 




7 


11 




4 


2 


18 


24 


112 


27 


16 


1 


2 


73 


56 


102 


23 


138 


108 


' "8 


14 


3 


"3 


23 


6 


16 


69 


86 


49 


3)3 


17 


3 


141 


112 


113 


37 


307 


. 92 


4 


40 


10 


4 


8 


5 


29 


106 


98 


160 


39 




4 


118 


59 


87 


38 


228 


72 


2 


15 


4 


5 


11 


12 


27 


80 


68 


112 


27 


* "ii 


5 


120 


U79 


110 


17 


278 


147 


1 


40 


10 


6 


12 


3 


25 


164 


129 


91 


42 




6 


69 


37 


54 


19 


91 


85 


3 


9 


6 


1 


9 


2 


13 


33 


65 


44 


21 


' "is 


7 


39 


60 


45 


12 


80 


76 




25 


10 


10 


20 






34 


40 


70 


10 


2 


8 


59 


50 


93 


15 


139 


51 


*27 


13 


3 


2 


16 


' '5 


" 'ie 


78 


73 


46 


16 


4 


9 


78 


96 


75 


12 


153 


85 


23 


24 


4 


5 


2 


3 


30 


66 


56 


112 


20 


7 


10 


104 


53 


84 


21 


174 


84 


4 


17 


3 


5 


18 


1 


28 


51 


89 


86 


31 


5 


11 


126 


48 


72 


30 


214 


49 


13 


19 


3 


5 


15 


6 


22 


105 


51 


75 


23 


22 


12 


244 


169 


247 


128 


644 


88 


56 


80 


35 


12 


45 


5 


43 


282 


99 


226 


90 


81 


13 


46 


57 


31 


'}? 


73 


54 


17 


8 


3 


1 


6 


4 


17 


32 


58 


47 


7 




14 


369 


88 


105 


502 


70 


7 


37 


8 


9 


10 


7 


88 


211 


62 


221 


82 


3 


15 


57 


52 


115 


23 


147 


82 


18 


18 


11 


17 


16 ... 


21 


66 


86 


55 


19 


21 


16 


363 


236 


265 


103 


768 


177 


22 


121 


8 


14 


22 7 


172 


330 


158 


298 


81 


100 


17 


57 


62 


113 


28 


99 


153 


8 


12 


8 


1 


15 


2 


15 


43 


120 


52 


34 


11 


18 


117 


84 


51 


27 


148 


118 


13 


17 


23 


4 


11 


5 


13 


71 


119 


46 


30 


13 


19 


82 


80 


51 


25 


146 


76 


16 


2 


. 8 


1 


7 


6 


29 


78 


58 


57 


19 


26 


20 


44 


117 


103 


37 


172 


69 


60 


18 


14 


3 


23 


3 


44 


96 


73 


69 


49 


14 


21 


370 


126 


81 


33 


514 


75 


21 


37 


13 


22 


9 


12 


53 


257 


81 


98 


127 


47 


22 


142 


133 


126 


63 


264 


144 


56 


12 


11 


14 


49 


4 


40 


149 


120 


113 


40 


42 


23 


119 


34 


44 


14 


142 


64 


5 


11 


4 


2 


9 


3 


17 


46 


57 


67 


30 


11 


24 


171 


58 


66 


22 


252 


60 


5 


25 


12 


6 


12i 5 


30 


102 


40 


117 


30 


28 


25 


60 


100 


92 


8 


130 


122 


8 


17 


4 


5 


21 


6 


18 


81 


73 


75 


11 


20 


26 


42 


$89 


61 


20 


95 


113 


4 


10 


10 


5 


11 


4 


6 


33 


90 


24 


12 


53 


27 


142 


109 


62 


23 


212 


118 


9 


40 


12 


6 


11 


10 


13 


102 


69 


92 


17 


5 6 


28 


63 


45 


97 


28 


123 


50 


60 


18 


13 8 


13 




10 


57 


103 


48 


17 


8 


29 


98 


221 


127 


22 


345 


121! 2 


71 


23 9 


8' 5 


9 


184 


121 


130 


17 


16 


30 


101 


133 


52 


21 


222 


79 


6 


15 


4 


3 


12| 2 


49 


88 


53 


89 


36 


41 


31 


86 
113 


54 
113 


59 
115 


29 
40 


96 

258 


115 
97 


17 

26 


7 
46 


"1.2 


"3 


2C 
13 






25 
153 


140 
95 


46 
91 


6 
25 


11 


32 


. . . 


'" "33 


17 


33 


63 


90 


40 


9 


112 


88 


2 


10 


20 


5 


14 


5 


15 


48 


101 


27 


26 




34 


221 


201 


127 


50 


596 


3 




59 




3 


6 


4 


107 


269 


1 


149 


104 


' " '76 


35 


181 


128 


72 


26 


396 


8 


"3 


35 


"3 


3 


5 


4 


61 


176 


8 


124 


52 


47 


36 


248 


182 


140 


40 


548 


38 


24 


60 


9 


20 


21 


27 


26 


292 


27 


103 


108 


80 


37 


152 


49 


45 


19 


132 


44 


89 


16 


9 


2 


14 


2 


31 


90 


54 


69 


28 


24 


38 


49 


92 


74 


10 


74 


125 


26 


7 


11 


1 


11 


1 


20 


24 


113 


48 


7 


33 


39 


90 


23 


27 


14 


91 


57 


6 


9 


11 




3 




22 


37 


55 


36 


20 


6 


40 


120 


161 


56 


13 


271 


79 




40 


12 


' *4 


8l 8 


43 


113 


59 


142 


27 


9 


41 


95 


121 


65 


19 


177 


117 


'*6 


§30 


§7 §6 


§12 


§5 


§36 


74 


95 


92 


27 


12 


5 


,078 


4,018 


3,601 


1,161 


9,624 


3,560 


674 


1,111 


385 235 575 


192 


1,305 


4,419 


3,255 


.3,723 


1,456 


1,005 


cial form 


• (8) 


Estim 


ited. 































50 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. — Table K. — Miscellaneous 



High Schools. 



EQUIPMENT. 



Si 

^ o c 



a -2 



S 



> !S 



+2 


P- 


a 


3 


-. 










o> 


iT" 




M 


-33 


ho 











Religious and other 
Exercises. 



1 Alexandria 

2 Almonte 

3 Arnnrior ... 

4 Arthur 

5 Athens 

6 Aurora 

7 Beamsville 

8 Belleville ... 

9 Berlin 

10 Bowmanville 

11 Bradford ... 

12 Brampton ... 

13 Brighton ... 

14 Caledonia 

15 Campbellford 

16 Carleton Pl'e 

17 Cavuga 

18 Colborne 

19 Cornwall 

21 Deseronto 

21 Dundas 

22 Dunnville .... 

23 Dutton 

24 East Toronto 

25 Elora 

26 Essex 

27 Fergus 

28 Forest 

29 Fort William 

30 Gananoque ... 

31 Georgetown .. 

32 Glencoe 

33 Gravenhurst 

34 Grimsby 

35 Hagersville .. 
3i Harriston 

37 Hawkesbury 

38 Iroquois 

39 Kemptyille .. 

40 Kincardine .. 

41 Leamington 

42 Listowel ... . 

43 Lucan 

44 Madoc 

45 Markham . .. 

46 Meaford ... . 

47 Mitchell 

48 Mt. Forest .. 

49 Newburgh .... 

50 Newcastle 

51 Newmarket . 

52 Niagara 

53 Niagara F. S 

54 North Bay 

55 Norwood 



31 • 
1 

2 . 
f . 
1 
4 . 

2 . 
6 I. 

\ . 
U • 

3 . 
1 

i . 

2 

4 

II: 

3 . 

ii: 

3J . 

* ■ 
21 . 

11 . 

* ■ 
2 I . 

1 1. 



318 
825 
309 
272 
435 
327 
309 
289 
435 
554 
290 
400 
274 
424 
278 
485 
218 
259 
474 
303 
496 
368 
201 

55 
186 
287 
189 
306 
121 
488 
230 
319 
161 
168 
316 
4 

77 
601 
309 
479 
266 
333 
217 
165 
235 
310 
233 
292 
429 
169 
184 
145 
239 



359 



33 

225 



101 

57 



445 
448 

. 361 
581 
447 
459 
287 
534 

1,360 
497 
328 
598 
314 
559 
472 
394 
346 
354 
373 
394 
567 
623 
534 
224 
361 
472 
244 
470 
214 
485 
351 
610 
385 
296 
501 
301 
14 

1,059 
424 
646 
419 
404 
601 
387 
785 
513 
415 
548 
331 
309 
583 
155 
344 
218 
290 



78 
87 
38 
69 
69 
70 

168 

115 
60 
49 
67 
42 
33 
29 
65 
24 
87 

141 
85 

109 
65 
31 
25 
43 
69 
76 
92 
57 

108 
71 
55 
46 
29 
54 



137 
68 
92 
92 
55 
73 
90 
46 
46 
64 
38 
58 
52 
74 
72 
41 



22 



12 



14 



10 



18 



40 

300 



700 



IS 



250 



1,250 
566 



350 



12 



210 
39 



220 



13 
239 
225 

10 



250 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



51 



HIGH SCHOOLS. -Continued. 
information. — Continued. 



Number of pupils in 


Number of pupils from 


Destination of pupils. 


Occupation of Parents 
of each pupil . 












§ 






6 


,£) 


Id 






o3 

04 






















W 


£• 




<u 


■a 


is ° 




u 
























09 


d 






.2 


■S-fl 







O 






















jg 


3 

o 
o 




S3 


'S, 


SO 

&<03 


<3 



























bo 


» 




u 





0)5 




S3 


>> 


+4 






















■5 


£ 




& 





£•0 


o> 


33 









05 

a 
















a 

a 

o . 

BO'S 

&3 


CO 

V 


.2 


•a ■ 

03 

o> 

"£ 
03 

O 


03 

a 

O 

0) 


O O) 


0) 

a 

CJ 

0) 

.a 



T3 

O) 

03 
O • 


t-l 




















03 
| 

I 
3 












•_j3 co 

7 S 


"3 


a 

n 


fj 


II 


l § 






^3 


o> 


0) 

3 


'3 





03 
O 
O 






m 


w 


j> 


.S-o 


& 


o 
o 


0) 


o> 


^ s 


03 


si 


0> 05 


0) 


9 


'a 


P 


3 




S 

o 


3 
o 


S- 

O 


a 

s- 

C 


c o 


B 




a 




IS 




a 


■§■8 


-2 fl 

a. 2 

d- 


a 

a 



o3 


03 


05 

O 

"o 


O 




£ 


^ 


Eu 


g 


<i 


B 


O 


a 


^ 


fc 


« 


[25 


fc 





< 


3 


S 


1 


75 


35 


31 




125 


7 


9 




1 


1 


3 




14 


10 


89 


39 


3 




o 


36 


43 


36 


4 


83 


31 


5 


' *7 


2 


6 


5 


' '4 


9 


34 


37 


40 


7 


"i 


3 


60 


37 


37 


4 


102 


18 


18 


2 


3 




6 




15 


8 


30 


99 


1 




4 


48 


41 


26 


4 


53 


66 




5 


6 


' 3 


6 




1 


36 


63 


14 


2 


' '4 


.5 


41 


49 


86 


3 


73 


104 


2 


1 


5 


3 


18 


"i 


10 


33 


101 


35 


10 




6 


36 


32 


36 


7 


50 


57 


4 


12 


9 


1 


1 


1 


9 


22 


53 


21 


8 


"7 


7 


36 


29 


9 





39 


35 




3 


4 


1 


'5 




5 


15 


36 


16 


5 


2 


8 


128 


70 


56 


16 


234 


36 




20 


8 


4 


15 


"6 


20 


107 


40 


82 


41 




9 


61 


81 


62 


12 


115 


101 




23 


5 


3 


7 


2 


15 


77 


31 


52 


44 


'ii 


10 


63 


36 


14 


11 


73 


51 




8 


4 




4 




8 


28 


47 


30 


6 


13 


11 


43 


36 


42 


5 


48 


71 


" ' " ' " 7 


8 


16 




2 


"3 


9 


12 


74 


28 


9 


3 


12 


82 


36 


39 


21 


95 


76 


7 


15 


12 


"4 


16 


3 


6 


44 


77 


26 


12 


19 


13 


23 


25 


26 




31 


43 




4 






7 






4 


27 


29 


8 


6 


14 


34 


30 


42 


7 


44 


53 


i6 




"7 




9 




"6 


19 


67 


12 


7 


8 


15 


66 


39 


42 


5 


105 


40 


7 


' "7 


6 




8 


"i 


12 


34 


62 


33 


13 


10 


16 


98 


28 


34 


7 


126 


28 


13 


14 


6 




8 


6 


14 


36 


39 


66 


21 


5 


17 


36 

24 


28 
19 


23 

24 


5 


31 
44 


61 
23 






3 
3 




6 
1 




18 
8 


11 
10 


55 
30 


15 
12 


11 
5 




18 




' "i 


"16 


19 


131 


61 


58 


ii 


146 


99 


is 


32 


7 


' *2 


14 


' 2 


11 


52 


113 


45 


16 


37 


20 


45 


23 


43 


4 


90 


20 


5 


9 






4 




14 


28 


33 


47 


6 1 


21 


66 


29 


44 




91 


48 




16 


"5 


"i 


10 


' *i 


6 


54 


36 


29 


13 


7 


22 


63 


36 


30 


3 


83 


43 


is 


11 


11 




4 




13 


56 


31 


46 


8 




23 


40 


54 


7 5 


34 


80 


117 


6 




8 


' "4 


11 






20 


109 


40 


24 


'16 


24 


21 
20 


11 
40 


10 

27 


7 


36 

55 


6 

38 














' 'i 

3 


8 
23 


1 
39 


17 
10 


3 
6 


13 


25 


i 


' 3 


"8 


"2 


"4 


' *i 


16 


26 


54 


44 


27 


13 


86 


50 


2 


11 


5 


2 


5 




17 


30 


62 


30 


16 




27 


33 


41 


5 7 


8 


67 


67 


4 


7 


8 


4 


6 


' '2 


8 


37 


64 


15 


18 


' *5 


28 


31 


39 


53 


9 


66 


65 


1 


4 


3 


1 


10 


2 


1 


19 


78 


12 


14 


9 


29 


40 
56 


13 
34 


11 
52 


2 


66 
106 






3 

7 




1 
3 


1 
3 




7 
24 


18 
32 


2 

47 


27 
47 


9 

16 


10 


30 


22 


14 




31 


43 


38 


39 


9 


49 


47 


33 


7 


' '4 


1 


8 




8 


32 


54 


26 


14 


"3 


32 


35 


19 


37 


7 


46 


52 




4 


2 


1 


4 




12 


16 


54 


14 


9 


5 


33 


37 


14 


30 




78 




3 


1 


1 




4 


* "2 


27 


19 


13 


36 


6 


7 


34 


24 


23 


14 




26 


22 


13 


10 


2 




2 




5 


14 


33 


8 


6 




35 


44 


25 


29 


6 


44 


58 


2 


6 


3 




5 




11 


25 


47 


24 


7 


"i 


36 


38 


30 


5 8 


20 


85 


16 


45 


8 


2 


' "2 


7 


* '3 


27 


34 


46 


35 


20 


11 


37 


35 


13 


14 


13 


41 


34 




1 


2 


1 


3 


1 


13 


24 


20 


22 


6 


3 


38 


65 


41 


35 


16 


54 


79 


24 


2 


7 


1 


7 


4 


10 


25 


86 


35 


10 


1 


39 


59 


65 


84 


' 24 


66 


60 


106 




3 


3 


19 


1 


8 


50 


100 


50 


20 


12 


40 


57 


49 


57 


9 


93 


76 


3 


'i6 


2 


1 


15 


3 


13 


48 


77 


22 


16 


9 


41 


46 


42 


53 


12 


66 


74 


13 


10 


5 


2 


12 




4 


22 


64 


28 


10 


29 


42 


41 


40 


62 


9 


83 


45 


24 


2 


3 


6 


6 




21 


54 


51 


27 


14 


6 


43 


66 


34 


31 


14 


88 


57 




2 


5 


1 


7 


' 'i 


3 


13 


72 


19 


12 


29 


44 


22 


24 


48 




44 


50 




4 


6 


4 


8 


2 


10 


8 


38 


15! 


7 


26 


45 


52 


56 


77 


23 


36 


157 


is 


27 


10 


2 


8 


1 


20 


37 


102 


37 


19 


13 


46 


40 


41 


48 


21 


68 


76 


6 


7 


8 


1 


15 


2 


11 


32 


69 


22! 


21 


6 


47 


49 


41 


53 




68 


72 


3 


6 


8 


1 


9 


2 


6 


18 


67 


41! 


15 


2 


48 


64 


41 


61 


13 


99 


25 


55 


7 




8 


15 


2 


24 


43 


63 


37, 


16 


20 


49 


59 


19 


66 




36 


104 


4 


6 


"8 


5 


12 


6 


2 


20 


100 


13 


5 


6 


50 


20 


14 


16 


' 'i 


17 


32 


2 


2 


4 




1 




4 


7 


28 


4 


8 


4 


51 


57 


36 


47 


2 


77 


59 


6 


9 


10 


' '2 


7 




5 


17 


65 


50 


5 


5 


52 


19 


14 


12 


2 


28 


19 




2 


4 




2 




4 


3 


20 


19 


3 


2 


53 


35 
39 


23 
23 


•22 
23 


3 


77 
80 


3 

5 


3 


7 
4 


5 








8 
6 


13 

27 


34 
7 


22 
31 


8 
9 


3 


54 




"i 




14 


55 


30 


5 


5.:. 




60 


53 


22 


6 


"8 


-i 


12 




7 


20 


77 


25 


8 


5 



7e. 



52 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III.— Table K. — Miscellaneous 



High Schools. 



EQUIPMENT. 



& Id 
P.JS 

£'3> 









Religious and 
other Exercises. 







o 




t~. 




- 

- 

ft 


0) 

3 






~ 


« 


'5 




•d 


bo 


so 


'- 


o 








- 





50 








o 


o 





a 












C> 


X 


tt! 



56 Oakville 


B. 
F. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 

s. 

B. 
B. 

1: 

B. 
B. 
B. 
S. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
3 _ 

b'. 


n 

3 
4 
3 

.* 

3 

5 

1 

13 

H 

31 

2 

1 

11 

13 


1 

1 
. 

1 
1 
1 

' i 

i 

. 

i 
i 
i 
i 


% 

285 
238 
628 
260 
357 
290 
259 
392 
665 
334 
352 
181 
514 
288 
93 
229 
140 
171 
108 
272 
428 
117 
177 
179 
254 
261 
235 
484 
283 
249 
333 
218 
201 
321 
336 
186 
274 
311 
221 


$ 

2 
9 

8 

5 
2G 
19 

' '26 

59 

53 

3 

' *54 

" 'is 

4 

41 

125 

" "is 

35 
91 

8 
29 
25 
65 
54 
. . . . . 

"'23 

" '3i 

5 

15 

35 


$ 

268 
302 
590 
401 
553 
500 
496 
403 
663 
309 
442 
404 
600 
457 
229 
367 
303 
299 
254 
688 
495 
285 
273 
225 
310 
347 
530 
354 
332 
268 
457 
230 
334 
410 
405 
600 
434 
302 
343 


25 
44 
57 
98 

108 

100 
92 
44 

118 
48 
19 
43 
95 
45 
44 

112 
53 
54 
12 

134 
67 
40 
42 
71 
31 
69 
84 
76 
54 

121 
54 
75 
55 
64 

110 
32 

105 
53 
87 


$ 
3 


$ 


% 


$ 


1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 


'i 

1 

'i 

1 

"i 

! 

.. 

"i 
*i 

'i 

"i 

1 


i 
'i 

i 

1 
1 
1 

'i 

'i 
1 


1 


57 Oinemee 




3 




1 


58 Orangeville ... 


26 

14 
9 
3 

15 
5 

45 




1 


59 Oshawa 






50 


1 

1 

'i 




60 Paris 




1 


61. Parkhill 

62 Pembroke .... 




44 


50 
50 


1 
1 


63 Petrolea 






64 Picton 











65 Port Arthur... 






20 


'i 


1 


66 Port Dover ... 

67 Port Elgin... . 


20 

30 

8 

8 

6 





7 


1 

1 


68 Port Hope ... 

69 Port Perry ... 

70 Port Rowan... 


' '200 


10 

30 

8 

29 


" 'io 


1 
'i 


1 
1 

"i 


72 Rat Portage... 


5 

35 

18 

29 

5 








1 


73 Richmond H'l 

74 Sa't Ste. Marie 




3 




1 
1 
1 


1 
1 


75 Simcoe 

76 Smith's Falls. 


5 

t 
13 
1 

li 

n 
n 

31 
i 

4 

11 

1 

3* 
3 

2 

1 

2* 

3 


i 
i 
. 

::::: 
..... 

i 
i 

i 





29 




1 


77 Smithville . 








1 




78 Stirling 












79 StreetsTille .... 


2 






25 


1 




3t Thorold 

c 2 '"'illsonburg ... 
83 Trenton 


4 

2 

7 

4 

10 

3 

33 

15 




4 
11 


' "i.50 


1 

'i 
1 
1 

1 


1 

'i 


8* TTxbridge ... . 








1 


85 "Vienna ... 

86 Walkerton .. 




50 

7 




i 


87 Wnrd«mlle 


1 
1 
1 


'i 


'i 




88 Wat^rdown 










1 


89 "Waterford. 








1 




99 "Watford 


47 




20 




1 


91 Welland 






1 
1 
1 
1 

91 
39 

130 

130 


1 
'i 

27 

36 

48 

~~~ 


1 
1 

30 
12 

42 

43 


1 


92 Weston 


15 










1 


93 Wiarton 










i 


94 Williamsto-nn 


10 
























1 Tot'a, High Sch 

2 Tot's. Col. Ins. 


184.15 
99. 


39 

16 


27,539 
32,940 


2,482 
1,994 


40,096 
43,049 


6,146 
5,414 


1,061 
881 


3,635 
51,679 


1,566 
8,650 


730 
2,608 


42 
29 

62 
60 


62 

,9 


3 Gr'd tot's. 1903 

4 Gr'd tot's, 1902 


283.15 

281.69 


55 
54 


60,479 
60,066 


4,476 
4,341 


83,145 
81,633 


11,560 
11,530 


1,942 
1,878 


55.3i4ilO.2i6 

56,435110,215 


3,338 
3,134 


91 

*7 




1.46 


1 


413 


135 


1,512 




30 


64 


1 


204 


2 


4 




1 ,121 






12 
27 


1 

31 





















96 




7 Percentages ... 




40.74 
















46 


.7 





















190^ 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



53 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Concluded. 
information. — Concluded. 



Number of pupils in 


Number of pupils 
from 


Destination of Pupils. 


Occupation of Parents of each 
Pupil. . 










X 

03 
X 


3 

o 
o 




o 
5 


03 


h 

CO 3 

£-3 
■go 


03 

xi 


03 

O 


A 
53 
o 

03 

o 

03 






















03 

X! 




0) 


03 


03 ** 

-co 


o 


>> 


o 






cc 














d 

Oh 

a 


3 




0) 


03 

a 


43 c 

^03 


C3 


T3 
03 


u 

o 






O 
03 














o . 


X 

03 


o 

.2 


3 
o 


o 

03 

X> 


0> C 

"5.2 

O 03 


OS 

C3 

03 
X! 
O 


03 
0) 

o . 


0> 

o 






ft 
5 

03 
O 




o 

I 

53 


















-c 3 


■^3 


A 


XI 


* 




03 






O 










i ft 




53 


^ 






* 


> o 


03 






s 






• 


y 


> 




Ph 








S- & 


u 


<~ % 


;_ 


S-. 






o 












~o 










* X 


03 


03 (D 


1X1 CT 




3 

.2 

bio 








| 


a 

O 


a 

O 


a 

o 


•p 

■ 53 GO 


3 


03 


X! 

3 


a&? 


s o 


a 

53 


2 ft 


x 2: 

a. § 

53+2 


a 


A 

03 

03 


33 

03 

o 


o 


fe 


h 


&H 


fc 


3 


3 


o 


£ 


£ 


S5 


fc 


fc 


fc 


o 


<! 


'S 


ft 


5^ 


6 26 


36 


22 




43 


33 


8 


4 


4 




5 


3 


8 


17 


29 


23 


7 


8 


7 19 


19 


14 




33 


17 


2 


2 


3 


1 


4 


1 


4 


3 


8 


5 


11 


8 51 


45 


99 


22 


88 


77 


52 


19 


6 


2 


14 


8 


33 


7? 


102 


26 


16 


3 


9 71 


50 


' 39 


14 


99 


60 


15 


18 


7 


2 


5 




14 


3 2 


54 


57 


16 


9 


62 


31 


24 


6 


91 


28 


4 


6 


3 




4 


5 


12 


3 b 


31 


33 


12 


11 


1 32 


43 


53 


14 


67 


68 


7 


6 


4 


4 


8 




3 


2 ! 


86 


27 


8 




2 50 


58 


38 


10 


'122 


32 


2 


18 


2 


3 


8 


1 


18 


M 


31 


37 


24 


13 


3 98 


44 


37 


7 


102 


83 


1 


14 


8 




12 




34 


34 


50 


49 


12 


41 


4 58 

5 22 


103 

42 


48 

7 


17 
1 


116 
68 


109 
4 


1 








12 
3 






4 S 
2 ^ 


108 
8 


47 
30 


21 

7 


4 


10 


2 




1 


5 


4 


6 29 

7 32 


16 

27 


34 
35 





51 
51 


17 
41 


11 

2 


5 
13 


2 

4 








5 

10 


12 

2 ^ 


29 
31 


17 
14 


4 
13 


17 


2 


7 


3 


11 


8 64 


57 


79 


20 


130 


84 


6 


16 


5 


4 


11 


3 


13 


5 1 


86 


47 


13 


20 


9 38 


17 


32 


13 


51 


36 


13 


4 


10 


6 


6 


4 


2 


3 ^ 


35 


23 


6 


3 


28 


14 


6 




24 


22 


2 


3 


3 




2 




10 


13 


20 


8 




7 


1 31 


29 


25 


3 


65 


21 


2 


5 


2 




7 


2 


14 


24 


20 


22 


2 


20 


2 31 


28 


26 




77 


8 




7 






3 


1 


13 


18 


1 


30 


4 


32 


3 31 


22 


30 




22 


61 




6 


5 




3 


1 


1 


18 


40 


16 


2 


7 


4 63 


38 


27 




118 


10 




3 


1 


2 


3 


1 


11 


39 


o 


59 


15 


10 


5 46 


51 


49 


11 


69 


87 


1 


16 


9 


8 


13 


2 


12 


38 


63 


35 


16 


5 


5 84 


47 


40 


13 


123 


30 


31 


14 


8 


1 


10 


4 


24 


33 


45 


60 


18 


28 


1 36 


20 


35 


4 


48 


46 


1 


3 


5 




6 


3 


9 


12 


70 


10 


2 


1 


5 16 


17 


28 


8 


21 


48 




3 


6 


1 


7 


1 


5 


1 


44 


15 


S 


1 


) 23 


12 


19 




21 


26 


7 


3 


2 


1 


3 


1 


7 


6 


31 


10 


4 


3 


) 53 


43 


57 




152 




1 


3 


7 


1 


14 


1 


20 


13 


120 


14 


4 


2 


L 40 


16 


25 


4 


50 


31 


4 


15 


5 




3 




7 


5 


30 


40 


16 




I 53 


24 


36 




75 


20 


18 


8 


5 


2 


4 


2 


15 


16 


45 


27 


14 


11 


; 59 


34 


33 


11 


88 


10 


39 


11 


4 




4 




13 


34 


42 


39 


12 


10 


t 47 


46 


32 


8 


75 


57 


1 


8 


6 


1 


3 




10 


24 


58 


34 


15 


2 


i 15 

; 54 


9 
37 


12 

52 


"*22 


36 
100 






I 


1 


"s 


3 
19 


"*7 


3 

27 


4 
37 


20 

41 


6 
52 


2 
32 


4 


57 


8 


S 


14 


11 


17 




21 


14 


7 


4 







4 




5 


4 


26 


4 


7 


1 


1 23 


21 


40 


4 


82 


2 


4 


6 


4 


4 





2 


2 


15 


40 


20 


5 


8 


1 34 


42 


27 


10 


32 


67 


14 


4 


14 




2 


1 


5 


21 


64 


12 


9 


7 


1 »6 


45 


62 


13 


56 


111 


9 


7 


22 




13 




6 


35 


98 


23 


7 


IS 


1 48 


44 


96 


14 


73 


126 


3 


24 


8 


1 


11 




21 


60 


56 


55 


31 




1 31 


19 


19 


2 


48 


19 


4 


1 


3 


3. 


1 




15 


16 


19 


10 


12 


14 


I 33 

1 41 


24 
25 


36 

27 


5 


74 
90 


22 


2 
6 


4 
5 






6 

5 


1 
1 


14 
3 


30 


12 
74 


48 
5 


8 
9 




7 


1 


3 


■ 4,311 


3,240 


3,649 


664 


6,704 


4,336 


824 


694 


459 


137 


641 


120 


986 


2,522 


4.7*49 


2,768l 


1,048 


777 


||5,07S 


4,018 


3,601 


1,161 


9,624 


3,560 


674 


1,111 


385 


235 


575 


192 


1,305 


4,419 3,255 


3,723 


1,456 


1,005 


||9,3S9 


'7,258 


7,250 


1,825 


16,328 


7,896 


1,498 


1,805 


844 


372 


1,216 


312 


2,291 


6,941 


8,004 


6,491 


2,504 


1,782 


118,587 
1 802 


i6,948 


7,077 


1,860 


15,864 


7,324 


1,284 


1,57-3 


743 


_ 388 


1,238 


317 


1,814 


6,477 


7,482 


6,052 


2,311 


2,150 


310 


173 




464 


572 


214 


232 


101 








477 


464 


522 


439 


193 










35 












16 


22 


5 












368 


























II 3G.5 


28.22 


28.19 


7.09 


63.48 


30.7 


5.82 


26.39 


12.34 


5.44 


17.78 


4.56 


33.49 


26.98 


31.12 


25.24 


9.73 


6.98 



54 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Table L. — Protestant Separate Schools. 



Statistics. 



Number of Schools 
Receipts : 



Balances from 19021 

Government Grants . . 

Municipal Grants 

Trustees' school taxes 
Other sources 



Totals 



Expenditure : 



Teachers' salaries 

School sites and buildings. 

Libraries, maps, etc 

Other expenses 



$ c. 
6 20 
4 05 



100 53 



Totals 

Balances on hand 



Teachers , 



Male 

Female 

Certificates 



Salaries. 



Pupils : 



Total number attending 

Bovs 

Girls 

Average attendance 

No. in 1st Reader, Part I 

1st il " II 

2nd " 

3rd " 

4th " 

5th " 

Writing 

Arithmetic 

Drawing 

Geography 

Music 

Grammar and Composition . 

English History 

Canadian History 

Physiology and Temperance 

Drill and Calisthenics 

Bookkeeping 

Algebra 

Geometry 

Botany 

Agriculture 



School houses (brick, frame or log) 

Number of maps 

Number of globes 



110 78 



87 50 



40 

16 75 



6 13 



Temp. 
156 00 



Log 



$ c. 

81 48 

2 45 



350 00 



433 93 



250 00 
2 33 



57 99 



311 30 



122 63 



250 00 



Frame 



$ c. 

19 75 

12 27 

150 00 

253 36 

130 00 



565 38 



300 00 
129 50 



52 80 



1 
III 



300 00 



$ c 

277 60 

20 65 

548 42 



8 59 



'B . 

a £ 

a 

s> 



$ c. 

92 91 

150 43 

1,972 85 



4 50 



855 26 



300 25 
' 35'94' 



336 19 



519 07 



1 
III 



300 00 



2,220 69 



1,612 46 

258 50 



346 20 
2,217 16 



$ c. 
477 94 
189 85 
2,671 27 
703 89 
143 09 

4,186 04 



2,550 21 

390 38 

1 38 

509 68 

3,451 60 



3 53 



734 44 



Male, 
. $675 00 
Female 
$317 00 



229 

127 

102 

144 

55 

49 

37 

41 

38 

9 

229 

229 

229 

229 

63 

229 

47 



47 
182 



5, II; 2, III; 

1 Temp. 

Av. Male, 

8675 00 
Av. Fem'le 

$279 00 



314 

173 

141 

191 

77 

64 

52 

62 

50 

9 

306 

306 

302 

276 

107 

276 

58 

121 

100 

250 

10 



17 



Frame 



Brick- 



Brick 



2B,2 F, 1! 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



55 



Cities. 


•S. <y 

II 

O O 

oft 


o 
a • 

Oi <-■ 

*H 03 

. o 

CO 

o> 0) 
5£ 

5.S 

°.S 

o 03 


No. of Nptices sent by Truant 
Officer to parent or guardi- 
ians . 


No. of complaints made before 
Police Magistrates or J.P.'s 


CO 



p g 

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c 

O 
o 

o 

o 

9 


bo 

a 
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20 


Towns. 


a 2 

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a "o 

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2§ 

2^ 

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a, 

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cat: 
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1 


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s 

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3 
© 

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03 

— . 

So 

3.S 

C3 o 
«- ■ 3 

>. 

. G 
O * 


Brantford 


50 


325 35 


12 


Perth 




10 
45 

6 


2 

15 
15 

6 
]5 

4 

9 


1 

2 




Chatham 


12 

40 
167 

27 
150 

53 
623 


2 

47 
265 
67 
51 
46 
57 
86 

4 


Peterborough . . . 






Guelph 


3 


2 
75 

4 
13 

9 
16 

3 


23 

4 

12 
9 

9 


5 

12 


Petrolea 


10 




Hamilton 


Port Arthur 








St. Catharines . . . 


10 
11 


Prescott 




2 


2 




St. Thomas 


Ridgetown 




4 
9 
19 
47 
71 
12 
5 

2 
2 
3 

7 




Stratford 


St. Marys 










Toronto 


119 


Sarnia 










Woodstock 


Seaforth 




12 

71 
12 
5 








Towns. 




4 


Smith's Falls 




2 


2 


71 


Arnprior 


Welland 






Avlmer 




11 11 
17 5 








Wiarton 








35 


Bairie 










Villages. 
Ailsa Craig 






Berlin 




4 

28 
2 


3 
15 
1 




Bowmanville 


6 






28 


Ayr 




5 
3 
5 
2 
3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
4 
6 
3 

16 
5 
5 
6 
3 








Bothwell 






Burk's Falls 








3 


Brock ville 




41 


2 


1 


2 
3 


Campbellford 

Clifford 


2 

7 








Carleton Place . . 




20 
5 


10 
6 








Cobourg 




1 


1 


Colborue . . 








Cornwall 




107 


Delhi . . 




5 








Deseronto 




150 

32 

9 

3 

20 


175 
22 

3 
1 
3 
7 
2 
3 




25 


Dundalk 








3 


Dundas 


5 


1 1 














• 
Durham 










3 
4 

6 

1 

1 
5 
3 
3 
3 
1 
15 
5 




Forest 


1 


Fergus 






Gait 


3 
3 


3 
2 




Fort Erie 










Huntsville 


3 


Glencoe 

Hintonburg 

L'Orignal 


1 
12 








Ingersoll 








Kingsville 


4 


2 
3 
100 
4 
1 

14 
8 

37 






2 








Kincardine 










1 






Lmdsav 


7 


101 


1 


1 


1 








Listowel 










2 


Mattawa . . 


1 
2 


1 

12 
8 
3 








Port Elgin 






Mitchell ... 








Shelburne 




7 
15 

3 
12 


1 


1 




Newmarket 








Tara 






Niagara 










Tweed .. 










North Bay . . . 


2 














S2 






3 


5 






108 


Totals 








Owen Sound 


256 51Q 


1,381 


154 


320 


. 















56 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Table N. — Report on Kindergartens. 



Municipality. 



Cities : 

Brantford 

Chatham 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

London 

Ottawa 

Stratford 

Toronto 

Towns : 

Aylmer 

Berlin 

Cobourg 

Dundas 

Gait 

Hespeler 

Ingersoll 

*Listowel 

Owen Sound 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Preston 

Simcoe 

Tillsonburg 

Toronto Junction 

Waterloo 

*Welland 



Totals. 






123 



9 
6 

2 
17 

4 
30 
24 

6 
123 



250 



"83 



O °3 



Am 

268 

131 
1,259 

203 
1,104 
1,168 

339 
5,080 



114 

253 
94 

127 
87 
55 
89 
56 

134 

186 
64 
94 

109 
83 

205 
56 
52 



11,880 



* Opened in September, 1903. 



Table 0. — Report on Night Schools. 



181 

114 
43 
474 
139 
384 
465 
108 
1,976 



41 
195 
37 
41 
39 
31 
29 
35 
47 
62 
30 
42 
33 
31 
84 
26 
19 



4,706 





Municipality. 






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H 


P- 


< 


St. Catharines... 




1 


1 


271 


6 


Toronto 




9 


16 


674 


156 


Totals 




10 


17 


701 


162 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



57 






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58 



THE REPORT OF THE 



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1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



59 






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60 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX C— RURAL PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARIES, 1903-4. 

Every rural school board that has established a Library under the conditions of 
the regulations receives a grant, equivalent to haJf the amount expended 
for the year, but not exceeding $10. 



Inspectorate. 



Brant 



Bruce W. 



Name of school (section number and township) 

and amount expended for books recom- . 

mended, during the academic year. 



Brantford, 27.40; 
Dumfries, 25.30 



13 Burford, 12.50; 13 S. 



Carleton 



Dufferin 

Dundas 
Durham 
Elgin .. 



14 Bruce, 30.37; 3 Culross, 30.91; 7 Culross, 
31.33; 8 Culross, 32.18, a ureenock, 13.03; 
1 Huron, 16.70; 12 Huron, 25.00; 8 Kin- 
cardine, 20.10; 11 Kincardine, 16.73; 2 Sau- 
geen, 14.42; 5 Saugeen, 30.00; 6 Saugeen, 
21.46 

8 Fitzroy, 20.00; 3 Gloucester, 12.50; 6 Glou- 
cester, 10.16; 9 Gloucester, 15.00; 19 Glou- 
cester, 17.00; 20 Gloucester, 20.00; 13 
Goulburn, 35.48; 3 N. Gower, 16.90; 11 N. 
Gower, 19.10; 1 March, 20.00; 6 Marl- 
borough, 19.91; 2 Nepean, 33.00; 3 Nepean, 
29.87; 11 Osgoode, 40.00; 8 Osgoode, 25.00; 
12 Osgoode, 20.00; 2 Torbolton, 20.00 .... 

2 Amaranth, 25.00; 10 Amaranth, 20.00; 4 E. 
Garafraxa, 20.44; 5 E. Garafraxa, 10.00; 
15 East Garafraxa, 20.00; 8 Melancthon, 
27.83; 13 Melachton, 20.00; 14 Melac- 
thon, 21.36; 8 Mulmur, 20.00 

5 Mountain, 16.85; 12 Mountain, 10.00; 4 Win- 
chester, 15.00; 12 Winchester, 45.39 

T Cartwright, 10.00; 6 Darlington, 20.00; 20 
Darlington, 5.72 



Total 
amount ex- 
pended for 
books recom- 
mended. 



3 Aldborough, 20.00; 4 Aldborough, 27.97 
5 Aldborough, 20.00; 6 Aldborough, 20.00 
7 Aldborough, 35.00; lv, ^iaborough, 21.00 
15 Aldborough, 20.00; 2 Bayham, 30.00; 8 
Bayham, 20.00; 9 Bayham, 20.00; 10 Bay- 
ham, 20.00; 11 Bayham, 10.00; 12 Bayham, 
4.00; 5 Dunwich, 20.00; 10 Dunwich, 
20.00; 12 Dunwich, 20.00; 1 Malahide, 
20.00; 2 Malahide, 25.00; 7 Malahide, 20.00; 
; 11 Malahide, 27.00; 13 
14 Malahide, 20.00; 15 
16 Malahide, 20.00; 1 
3 Southwold, 20.00; 6 
7 Southwold, 20.00; 9 
10 Southwold, 20.00 
12 Southwold, 35.00 
21 Southwold, 15.00 



8 Malahide, 20.00 
Malahide, 21.00; 
Malahide, 20.00; 
Southwold, 20.00; 
Southwold, 25.00; 
Southwold, 20.00 
11 Southwold 
17 Southwold 



20.00; 
20.00; 



■•0 S. 



6 S. Dorchester, 20.00; 
20 00 ; 3 Yarmouth, 20.00 ; 7 
mouth, 10.00 ; 8 Yarmouth, 
9 Yarmouth, 30.00; 13 Yarmouth 
14 Yarmouth, 27.00; 17 Yarmouth 
19 Yarmonth, 10.46; 22 Yarmouth 
24 Yarmouth, 11.50 



Dorchester 
Yar 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
25.00 



$ c 
65 20 



Total 

Government 

grant. 



S c 
26 25 



282 23 i 



110 43 



373 92 



184 63 



87 24 



35 72 



155 28 



85 00 



30 92 



17 86 



9'9 ?3 



430 48 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



Gl 



APPENDIX C— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Essex N. 

Essex S. . 
Frontenac 



Haldimand 



Haliburton, etc. 



Halton 



Hastings N. 
Hum*' E. . 



Name of school (section number and township) 
and amount expended for books recom- 
mended, during the academic year. 



3 Maidstone, 31.00; R. C Sep. School, 1 Sand- 
wich E, 10.00 



5 Gosfield S., 11:09 



20.00; 
20.00; 
20.00; 
1 Oso, 



Glengarry 
Grey E. . 
Grb^ a. . 

Grey W... 



Barrie, 20.00; 16 Bedford, 20.00; 2 Claren- 
don, 25.00; 4 Hinchinbrooke, 20.00; 9 Hinch- 
inhrooke, 23.73; 2 Kennebec, 25.00; 1 
Kingston, 22.90; 2 Kingston, 25.00; 3 Kings- 
ton, 20.00; 13 Kingston, 20.00; 14 Kingston, 
20.00; 15 Kingston, 20.00; 17 Kingston, 
18 Kingston, 20.00; 20 Kingston, 

1 3 Loughboro, 20.00 ; 4 Loughboro, 

14 Loughboro, 20.00; 4 Olden, 20.00; 
20.12; 2 Oso, 20.00; 4 Oso, 20.00; 9 

Oso, 20.00; 1 Palmerston, 20.00; 3 Palmers- 
ton, 20.00; 6 Palmerston, 20.00; 3 Pitts- 
burgh, 20.00; 5 Pittsburgh, ^>.50; 8 Pitts- 
burgh, 27.00; 10 Pittsburgh, 32.90; 13 
Pittsburgh, 20.00; 19 Pittsburgh, 20.00; 3 
Portland, 25.20; 1 Storrington, 20.00; 2 
Storrington, 20.00; 3 Storrington, 25.00; 

5 Storrington, 20.10; 

10 Storrington, 20.00; 

13 Storrington, 20.00; 

Island, 20.00; 5 Wolfe Island, 

Wolfe Island, 20.00 



4 Storrington, 20.10; 
8 Storrington, 20.00; 
12 Storrington, 20.15; 
4 Wolfe 
20.00; 15 



16 Kenyon, 12.98 . . . 
4 St. Vincent, 10.40 



3 Bentinck, 20.00; 7 Egremont, 13.00; 10 
Glenelg, 17.58; 1 Normanby, 15.00; 4 Nor- 
manby, 10.40; 15 Normanby, 20.23; 7 Pro- 
ton, 16.00 ; 9 Proton, 20.00 

u Holland, 10.00; 3 Derby, 10.00; 8 Sydenham, 
6.70 

7 Walpole, 3.94; 11 Walpole, 10.00; 3 Rainham, 
10.00 

2 Glamorgan, 10.50; 2 Guilford, 16.50; 1 Mon- 
mouth, 10.50; 2 Monmouth, 20.60; S.Mon- 
mouth, 20.90; 5 Monmouth, 23.65; 6 Mon- 
mouth, 20.50; 2 Snowdon, 7.60; 3 Chaffey, 
20.83; 7 Cnaffey, 14.00; 7 Stisted, 30.00 .... 

1 Esquesing, 6.OT; A. E. Esquesing, 32.00; 6 Tra- 
falgar, 21.00;. 12 Trafalgar, 6.00; 18 Tra- 
falgar, 10.00; 3 Nelson, 27.00; 4 Nelson, 
10.00 



20 Rawdon, 20.15 



4 Grey, 19.00; 10 Grey, 20.00; 11 Howick, 20.00; 
1 Morris, 20.00; 10 Morris, 14.00; 9 Tucker- 
smith, 16.00 



Total 
amount ex- 
pended for 
books recom- 
mended. 



$ c. 
41 00 
11 09 



Total 

Govern inent 

grant. 



$ C. 

15 00 

5 54 



957 70 | 450 00 
12 98 [ 6 49 
10 40 '! 5 20 



I 

! 

132 21 i 



26 70 



2o 94 



19o 58 



112 00 



f 
20 15 | 



109 00 



65 99 



13 35 



11 97 



89 F 5 



'6 00 
10 00 



62 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX G.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Huron W. 



Kent E. 



Kent W. 



Lambton E. 
Lanark . . 



Leeds No. 2 



Name of school (section number and township) 
and amount expended for books recom- 
mended, during the academic year. 



Ashfield, 20.00; 13 Ashfield, 23.95; 2 Col- 
borne, 15.00; 7 Hay, 10.00; 6 Stanley, 
20.22; 5 Stephen, 13.59; 11 Stephen, 20.00; 
16 Stephen, 28.40; 5 Usborne, 20.15; 

6 Usborne, 20.00; 7 Usborne, 20.00; 9 E. 
Wawanosh, 30.00; 15 W. Wawanosh, 10.0-t.. 

Harwich, 20.00; 4 Harwich 20.00; 7 Har- 
wich, 20.00; 16 Harwich, 20.00; 1 Howard 
33.00; 2 Howard, 23.50; 3 Howard, 20.00; 

7 Howard, 20.00; 14 Howard, 10.00; 5 Cam- 
den, 33,00; 7 Camden, 23.50; 3 Zone, 10.00; 
4 Zone, 40.00 



Total 
amount.ex- 
pendedjifor 
books recom- 
mended. 



$ C. 



1 Chatham, 25.00; 2 Chatham, 20.30; 12 Chat- 
ham, 13.00; 17 Chatham, 12.00; U. 1 Chat- 
ham, 8.48; 2 Dover, 15.00; 10 Dover, 25.00; 
12 Dover, 10.00; 4 S. Raleigh, 10.00; 4 N. 
Raleigh, 10.00; 10 Raleigh, 10.00; 



5 Euphemia, 20.74 



Bathurst, 15.00; 5 Bathurst, 12.14; 12 Bath- 
urst, 10.00; 6 Beckwith, 14.80; 11 Drum- 
mond, 20.00; 13 Drummond, 20.00; 10 Lan- 
ark, 12.50; 3 Ramsay, 15.00; 6 and 7 Ram- 
say, 29.00; 10 Ramsay, 18.00; 15 Ramsay, 
61.00; 1 N. Sherbrooke, 15.00; 2 S. Sher- 
brooke, 11.50 



Leeds No. 3 and Gren- 
ville 



Lennox and Addington 



Lincoln 



Middlesex E. 



L Kitley, 30.00; It) Kitley, 20.00; 15 Kitley, 
20.00; 18 Kitley, 10.00; 4 Front and Yonge, 
10.00; 17 Front and Yonge, 20.19; 4 Eliza- 
bethtown, 10.00; 7 Elizabetlitown, 11.97; 
9 Elizabethtown, 20.31 

15 Edwardsburg, 19.60; 8 Oxford, 10.00 

19 Camden, 9.07; 18 N. Fredericksburg, 31.73; 
6 Sheffield, 35.00 

4 Caistor, 20.00; 1 Caistor. 20.00; U. 2 Clinton 
and 3 Louth, 33.64; U. 3 Clinton and 4 
Louth, 21.50; 2 Clinton, 20.00; U. 1 Clinton 
and 2 Louth, 30.00; 8 Gainsboro, L-.00; 1 
Gainsboro, 20.00; 4 Gainsboro, 20.00; 2 
Gainsboro, 20.53; 5 Gainsboro, 20.00; 9 
Gainsboro, 20.00; 1 N. Grimsby, 20.00; U. 5 
N. Grimsby, 20.00; 11 S. Grimsby, 22.01; 2 
Louth, 20.00; 3 Louth, 59.00; 4 Louth, 20.00; 
1 Louth, 20.75; 8 Niagara, 20.00 

11 N. Dorchester, 6.4a; 16 N. Dorchester, 23.20; 
3 Westminster, 2.50; 5 Westminster, 20.00; 
10 Westminster, 20.00; 14 Westminster, 
15.00 



Middlesex W U 



1 and 2 Adelaide and W. Williams, 20.08; 
U. 2 Adelaide and E. Williams, 22.21; Ij 
Ekfrid, 20.00; 6 Lobo, 11.06; 7 Mosa, 15.00 



Total 

Government 

grant. 



$ c. 



251 35 | 114 32 



293 00 ! 120 00' 



158 78 



*zu 74 



253 94 I 



75 80 I 



467 43 



87 10 



P8 35 



74 24 



10 00 



iUl 97 



152 47 I 70 98 

29 60 ! 14 80 
I 

I 



24 53 



?00 °0 



41 °5 



4,7 0' 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



63 



APPENDIX C— Continued. 



Inspectorate . 


Name of school (section number and township) 
and amount expended for books recom- 
mended, during the academic year. 


Total 
amount ex- 
pended for | 
books recom- i 
mended. 


Total 

Government 

grant. 




2 Middleton, 13.00; 3 Middleton, 20.06; 2 Wind- 
ham, 9.76; 3 Woodhouse, 3.50 


46 32 


$ c. 




23 13 


Northumberland . . 


17 Cramahe, 25.54; 10 Hamilton, 10.00-; 11 and 
12 Haldimand, 20.00; 16 and 18 Murray 
and Brighton, 24.55; 9 Murray and 








Brighton, 20.00 


100 09 


45 00 


Ontario W 


4 Brock, 20.00; 13 Brock, 20.00; 1 Mara, 20.00; 
2 Mara, 20.00; 5 Mara, '20.00; 10 Mara, 
20.00; 5 Rama, 20.00; 6 Rama, 20.00; 3 
Scott, 20.00; 1 Scugog, 20.00; 2 Scugog, 
20.00; 3 Scugog, 20.00; 2 Thorah, 20.00; 
5 Thorah, 30.00; 3 Thoran, 20.00; 3 Ux- 
bridge, 20.00; 9 Uxbridge, 20.00; 7 Ux- 
bridge, 20.00; 2 Uxbridge, 30.00; 10 Ux- 
bridge, 10.00; 4 Uxbridge, 20.00; 12 Ux- 
bridge, 20.00; 6 Uxbridge, 20.00; 11 Ux- 








bridge, 10.00 


480 00 


230 CO 


Ontario S 


4 Reach, 9.93; 1 Reach, 10.00 


ly 93 


9 97 


Oxford 


6 E. Nissouri, 20.00; 11 E. Nissouri, 10.00; 2 N. 
Oxford, 2.00; 8 E. Zorra, 25.00; 3 E. Zorra, 








* 20.98; 9 E. Zorra, 12.23; 8 W. Zorra, 22.00.. 


112 21 


52 11 


Perth 


7 Downie, 20.57; 8 Downie, 10.95; 
U. 2 Elma, 20-80; 3 Elma, 














22.00; 7 Elma, 28.71; 7 Hibbert, 








20.00; 2 Logan, 20.00; 4 Logan, 10.05; 9 








Logan, 20.00; 3 Mornington, 20.00; 12 








Mornington, 34.00; U. 5 Wallace, 10.00; 6 








Wallace, 4.98 


242 06 


j 107 93 


Peterboro 


1 Otonabee, 27.05 ; 2 Smith, 13.20 


<0 25 


16 60 


Prince Edward 


5 Hallowell, 10.00; 13 Hallowell, 10.00; 14 






Hallowell, 20.00; 2 Sophiasburgh, 17.22; 








4 Sophiasburgh, 20.00; l'tf Sophiasburgh, 








15.00; 12 Sophiasburgh, 10.00; 14 S. Marys- 








burgh, 22.00 


124 22 


61 11 


Presoott and Russell . . 


10 N. Plantaganet, 26.06; 1. S. Plantaganet 
21.1'.; 5 Cumberland 23.08; 6 Cumberland, 
20.05; 8 Cumberland, 10.55; 4 Clarence, 








20.00 ; 3 Russell, 20.57 


141 47 


65 27 




6 Admaston, 12.67; 8 Bromley, 20.74; 4 Grat- 
tan, 27.55; 7 Radcliffe, 20.00; 8 Ross, 30.68: 














5 Stafford, T7.30; 1 Stafford, 11.00 


139 94 


CO 48 


Simcoe E. and W. 








Muskoka 


6 Medonte, 18.50; 16 Medonte, 27.90; 5 Orillia, 
20.00; 7 Orillia, 30.24; 13 Orillia, 30.00; 10 
Oro, 22.19; 16 Oro, 23.25; 6 Tay, 20.21; 12 
Tay, 27.00; 2 Medora, 20.00; 3 Medora, 
30.00; 2 Morrison, 20.00; 3 Morrison, 20.00; 
4 Morrison, 7.44; 5 Morrison, 6.48; 5 Watt, 








30.00 


353 21 


| 146 21 



64 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX C— Concluded. 



Inspectorate . 



Stormont . . 
Victoria E. 
Victoria W. 
Waterloo . . 



Wellington N 

Wellington S ,.. 



Wentworth 



York N. 



York S. 



Algorna . . 
Manitoulin . . 
Parry Sound 



Name of school (section number and township) 
and amount expended for books recom- 
mended, during the academic year. 



R. C. Separate Schools 
W. Ontario 



3 Finch, 20.00 

7 Ops, 30.00 

17 Mariposa, 10.00; 8 Eldon, 56.38 



4 Wellesley, 12.00; 16 Wellesley, 23.69: 
Woolwich, 10.00 



6 Peel, a30.00; 13 Peel, 7.10 



1 Erin, 18.18; l.W. Garafraxa, 13.81; 6 W. 
Garafraxa, 19.20 



2 Ancaster, 20.00; 5 Ancaster, 15.64; 10 An- 
caster, 20.00; 3 Barton, 20.00; 9 Beverly, 
24.00; 10 Beverly, 9.39; 13 Beverly, 10.00; 
14 Beverly, 20.00; 1 Binbrook, 27.74; 6 
Flamboro E., 21.65; 4 Flamboro W., 10.00; 
6 Flamboro W., 17.85; 2 Glanford, 20.11.... 

4 Georgina, 33.85; 7 E. Gwillimbury, 27.50; 10 
E. Gwillimbury, 20.00; 3 E. Gwilnmbury, 
20.00; 5 Vaughan, 4.35; 7 Whitchurch, 9.95; 
9 Whitchurch, 12.00 



1 Etobicoke, 20.00; U. 3 Etobicoke and 24 
York, 20.00 



Ma&sey Station, 20.00 

1 Eobihson, 20.00; 1 Tenkummah, 25.00 .. .. 

3 Perry, 30.00; 4 Ryerson, 20.00; 1 Spence, 
19.90; 5 Strong, 15.00 



Total 
amount ex- 
pended for 
books recom- 
mended . 



1 Oarrick and Culross, 11.00; 9 Downie, 20.00; 

3 Holland, 10.00; 5 Raleigh, 10.53; 6 

Raleigh, 20.00; 7 Sydenham, 10.00 



Totals, 1903-4, 424 Libraries.. 
Totals, 1902-3, 320 Libraries.. 

Increases — 104 Libraries.. 



Total 

Government 

grant . 



$ c. 

20 00 


I * 


c. 

10 00 


( 
30 00 


I 


10 00 


66 38 




15 00 


45 69 




21 00 


37 10 




18 55 



51 19 



23o M 



127 65 | 

40 00 

20 00 

45 00 | 
I 

84 90 I 

81 53 | 



25 59 



111 43 

53 14 

29 00 
10 00 
20 CO 

37 45 
40 76. 



1 

8,195 70 
6,889 02 1 
1 


3,656 41 
2,894 22 


1,306 68 | 


762 19 


I 





a Twenty 



dollars of this sum were expended in the preceding year. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



65 



APPENDIX J).— INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS. 

I. — List of Inspectors, 1904. 



Public School 

Inspectors. 



T. W. Standing, B.A 
W. S. Clendenning 



W. I. Chisholm, M.A... 

Robert H. Cowley, B.A 

Nathaniel Gordon 

Arthur Brown 

W- E. Tilley, M.A.,Ph.D ; 

Welburn Atkin 



jet D. Chenay 

D. A. Maxwell, B. A, 
LL.B., Ph.D 

Wm. Spankie, M.D 

Don'd McDiarmid, M.D 

Andrew Grier 

H. H. Burgess, B.A... 

N. W. Campbell 

Clarke Moses , 

Syivanus Phillips, B.A. 

J. S. Deacon 

William Mackintosh... 

John Johnston 

David Robb 



Jurisdiction. 



Wiarton ; 



Post Office. 



Brantford 
Walkerton 



Kincardine 



Ottawa 



Orangeville 
Morrisburg. 



St. Thomas. 
Windsor .... 



J Elgin Tom 

Rev. W. H. G. Colles. 
Robert Park 



C. A. Barnes, M.A 

D. D. Moshier, B.A., B, 
Paed 



Brant; Town of Paris 

Bruce, East; Towns of Walkerton, 
Villages of Chesley, Tara 

Bruce, West • Town of Kincardine ; Villages of 
Lucknow,' Paisley, Port Elgin, Southampton, 
Teeswater, Tiverton . , 

Carleton; Villages of Hintonburg, Ottawa East, 
Richmond 

Dufferin; Town of Orangeville; Villages of Grand 
Valley, Shelburne 

Dundas; Villages of Chesterville, Iroquois, Morris- 
burg, Winchester 

Durham and S. Monaghan Tp. ; Towns of Bowman- 
ville, Port Hope; Villages of Millbrook, New- 

castle Bowmanvill 

Elgin; Town of Aylmer; Villages of Dutton, Port 
Stanley, Springfield, Vienna .... 

Essex, North (No. 1); Town of Sandwich; Village 
of Belle River 

Essex, South (No. 2); Towns of Amherstburg, 
Essex, Kingsville, Leamington 

Frontenac; Villages of Garden Island, Portsmouth 

Glengarry; Town of Alexandria; Villages of Lan- 
caster, Maxville 

Grey, East; Town of Thornbury 

Grey, West; Town of Owen Sound- Village of 
Chatsworth ' 

Grey, South; Towns of Durham, Meaford; Villages 
of Dundalk, Hanover, Markdale .. 

Haldimand; Town of Dunnville; Villages of Cale- 
donia, Cayuga, Hagersville 

Haliburton, North East Muskoka; South Nipissing, 
East Parry Sound; Town of Huntsville 

Ilalton; Towns of Milton, Oakville; Villages of 
Acton, Burlington, Georgetown 

Hastings, North; Villages of Madoc, Marmora 
Stirling 

Hastings, South; City of Belleville; Towns of 
Deseronto, Trenton; Village of Tweed 

Huron, East; Towns of Clinton, Seaforth, 
Wingham; Villages of Blyth, Brussels, Wrox- 
eter 

Huron, West; Town of Goderich; Villages of 
Bayfield, Exeter, Hensall 

Kent, East; Towns of Blenheim, Bothwell, Ridge- 
town; Village of Thamesville 

Kent, West; City of Chatham; Towns of Dresden, 
Wallaceburg; Village of Tilbury .. 

Lambton, East (No. 2) . Town of Petrolea; Villages 

of Alvinston, Arko'na, Oil Springs, Watford... Petrolea 

Lambton, West (No. 1); Towns of Forest, Sarnia; 

Villages of Point Edward, Thedford, Wyoming Sarnia 



Windsor 
Kingston 



Maxville 

Thornbury .. 

Owen Sound 

Durham 



Caledonia 
Minden . 
Milton .... 



Madoc 



Belleville 



Brussels 
Goderich 
Chatham 
Chatham 



! 1.2' 



2 s o a u 

aj _ . rt OS >H 



$ c. 

1,155 00 

1,470 00 

1,430 00 
1,355 00 
1,440 00 
1,090 00 

1,420 00 

1,638 50 

750 00 

b 1,725 00 
1,545 00 

1,048 11 
1,051 00 

1,300 00 

1,552 00 

.1,223 25 

1,627 00 
1,410 00 
1,547 50 
1,625 00 

1,15-1 25 

1,542 00 

980 00 

1,524 00 
1,420 50 



Also Inspector of R. C. Bilingual Schools in Essex and Kent 
Including salary lor Windsor and Walkerville. 



GO 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



List of Inspectors, 1904.— Continued. 



Public School Inspectors. 



F. L. Michell, M.A. 
Wm. Johnston, M. A 
LL.B 

Robert Kinney, M.D 

T. A. Craig 

Frederick Burrows .... 

W. W. Ireland, B.A. 



J. Thompson, 
D. Johnson . 



B.A 



Jurisdiction. 



Athens 
Brockville 

Kemptville 

Napanee 



St.Catharines 
London 



H. Frank Cook, B.A. 



Albert Odell 



James McBrien .. 
John Waugh, B.A. 

Paed 

William Carlyle .. 



D< 



Allan Embury 



William Irwin, B.A.. 



J. Coyle Brown 



W. J. Summerby 



G D. Piatt, B.A. 



E. G. Scott, B.A. 



Strathroy 



Simcoe 



Cobourg 



J. C. Morgan, M.A. 



Rev. Thos. McKee 



Isaac Day, B.A. 



Alexander McNaughton 
J. H. Knight 



W. H. Stevens, B.A. 



Thomas Pearce 



C. F. W Sheppard. 



J. H. Ball, M.A. 



Lanark; Towns of Almonte, Carleton Place, Perth 

Smith's Falls;' Village of Lanark , 

Leeds and Grenville, (No. 1) ; Town of Gananoque 

Villages of Newboro, Westport 

Leeds and Grenville, (No. 2); Village of Athens .. 

Leeds- and Grenville, (No. 3); Town of Prescott; 

Villages of Cardinal, Kemptville, Merrickville.. 

Lennox and Addington; Town of Napanee; Vil 

lages of Bath, Newburgh 

Lincoln; Town of Niagara; Villages of Beams 

ville, Grimsby, Merritton, Port Dalhousie 

Middlesex, East; Village of Lucan - 

Middlesex, West; Towns of Parkhill, Strathroy; 

Villages of Ailsa Craig, Glencoe, Newbury, 

Wardsville *_'*" 

Norfolk; Town of Simcoe ; Villages of Delhi, Port 

Dover, Port Rowan, Waterford 

Northumberland; Town of Cobourg; Villages of 

Brighton, Campbellford, Colborne, Hastings 
Ontario, North; Town of Uxbridge; Villages of 

Beaverton, Cannington, Port Perry 

Ontario, South; Towns of Oshawa, Whitby 

Oxford; City of Woodstock; Towns of ingersoll, 

Tillsonburg; Villages of Embro, Norwich 

Peel; Town of Brampton; Villages of Bolton, 

Streetsville ;"'" """ 

Perth; Towns of Listowel, Mitchell, St. Marys; 

Village of Milverton - »•.-"• 

Peterborough; Villages of Havelock, Lakefield, 

Norwood ."••••• 

Prescott and Russell; Towns of Hawkesbury, Van- 

kleek Hill; Villages of Casselman, L'Ongnal, 

Rockland ""'"' 

Prince Edward; Town of Picton; Village of Wei 

lington "• "'"' 

Renfrew ; Towns of Arnprior, Pembroke, Renfrew 

Villages of Cobden, Eganville 

Simcoe, North . Towns of Barrie, Midland, Orillia, 

Penetanguishene; Village of Creemore itfarne 

imcoe, Southwest; Towns of Alliston, Stayner; 

Villages of Beeton, Bradford, Tottenham 
Simcoe, East, and West Muskoka; Town 

Gravenhurst; Village of Port Carlmg 

Stormont; Town of Cornwall " 

Victoria, East; Town of Lindsay; Villages of 

Bobcaygeon, Omemee '*"' 

Victoria, West, and Southeast Muskoka; Town of 

Bracebridge; Villages of Fenelon Falls, Wood- 

ville "' ' 

Waterloo, No. 1; Towns of Berlin, Hespeler, 

Preston, Waterloo; Village of Elmira 

Waterloo, No. 2; Town of Gait; Villages of Ayr, 

New Hamburg •""' 

Welland; City of Niagara Falls; Towns of Thor 

old, Welland; Villages of Bridgeburg, Chip- 

pawa, Fort Erie, Port Colborne Welland 




Prince Albert 
Whitby 

Woodstock ... 

Brampton ... 

Stratford ... 

Peterboro ... 



Russell 



Picton 



Pembroke 



of 



Barrie 



Orillia ... 
Cornwall 

Lindsay 



Lindsay 



Berlin 



Berlin 



1,385 00 
1,279 00 



1,185 00 

d 1,535 00 

1,584 13 

1,015 00 
1,105 50 

1,875 00 
1,200 00 
1,691 75 
1,380 00 

1,192 50 

1,037 00 

2,140 00 

1,616 00 

1,450 00 

1,536 25 
1,015 00 

861 76 

1,423 00 
2,300 00 



1,413 75 



c. Appointed in 1904. 



d. Salary of former Inspector. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



67 



I. — List of Inspectors, 1904. — Continued. 



Public School Inspectors. 



i)avid Clapp, B.A. 



J. J. Craig, B.A 

J. H. Smith 

A B Davidson, B.A. 



David Fotheringham. 



Jurisdiction. 



John Eitchie 



b L. A. Green, B.A... . 

Donald McCaig 

b J. B. McDougall, B.A 

Rev. Geo. Grant, B.A. 

aWm. Wilkinson, M.A. 

Wm. Tytler, B.A 

W. H. Ballard, M.A 

W. G. Kidd 

e C. B. Edwards, B.A 
John 0. Glasham, LL.D 

J. B. Grey 

S. Silcox, B.A.,D. Paed. 

J. Russell Stuart 

James L. HugKes 

W. F. Chapman 

e Robt. Mead, M.A I 

John Connolly i 

Duncan Walker, B.A....! 



Wellington, North; Towns ot Harriston, Mount 
Forest, Palmerston; Villages of Artnur, Clif- 
ford, Drayton 

Wellington, South • Villages of Elora, Erin, Fergus 

Wentworth; Town of Dundas; Village of Water 
down 

York, North; Towns of Aurora, Newmarket; Vil 
lages of Holland Landing, Richmond Hill 
Sutton 

York, South ; Towns of East Toronto, North Toron 
to, Toronto Junction; Villages of Markham, 
Stouffville, Weston, Woodbridge 

Districts of Thunder Bay, Rainy River; Towns of 
Fort Frances, Fort William, Port Arthur, Rat 
Portage, Rainy River 

District of Algoma; Towns of Bruce Mines, Mas 
sey, Sault Ste. Marie, Steelton, Thessalon 

Manitoulin Island, etc.; Towns of Collingwood, 
Gore Bay, Little Current 

District of North Nipissing, etc. ; Towns of Cache 
Bay, Copper Cliff, Haileybury, Mattawa, New 
Liskeard, North Bay, Sturgeon Falls, Sudbury. 

District of West Parry Sound; Town of Parry 
Sound; Villages of Burk's Falls, Sundridge. 

City of 



Post Office. 



do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 



Prin. Co. Model School, City of ■ 

do do do • 

City of .... 

do ..- 

City of Windsor and Town of Walkerville. 

Town of 

do 



Harriston 
Fergus .... 



Hamilton 



Newmarket. 



Toronto 



Port Arthur 
S. Ste. Marie 
Collingwood 



North Bay. 



Orillia 

Brantford ... 

Guelph 

Hamilton ... 
Kingston ..< 

London 

Ottawa 

St.Catharines 
St. Thomas 
Stratford ... 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Windsor 

Brockville ... 
Peter boro ... 

Total 






1,100 00 
1,100 00 

1,270 00 



1,119 00 
1,725 50 
c 625 00 

a 1,800 oo 

2,024 20 



1,815 27 

d 400 00 

600 00 

2,20» 00 

1,400 00 

d 1,585 00 

2,400 00 

400 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

3,500 00 

2,250 00 



1,000 00 
1,200 00 



105,791 46 



o. Appointed in 1904. since deceased . 

b. Duties commenced January, 1904. 

c. Five months' salary. 

d. Salary of former Inspector. 

e. Appointed in 1904 



J. P. Hoag, B.A., appointed, duties to commence 1st May, 1905. 



8 E. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



List of Inspectors, 1904. — Concluded. 



Other Inspectors. 


Post Office. 


Salary, 
1903. 


Travelling 
expenses 

paid, 

1903. 


Total. 





Separate School Inspectors: 


Toronto 


$ c. 

1,700 00 
1,700 00 
1,700 00 

1,500 00 


$ c. 

414 05 
566 25 
418 90 

304 45 


$ c 

2,114 05 
2,265 25 
2,118 90 

1,804 45 


$ c 


Michael O'Brien 

John F. Power, M.A 

Inspector of Bilingual Separate Schools: 

Telesphore Kochon, B.A., (East) 

a D. Chenay, (West) 

Inspector Technical Schools: 

Albert H. Leake 


Peterborough. 
London 

Clarence Creek 




Toronto 

Toronto 


1,850 00 

2,750 00 
2,750 00 




2,257 10 

3,277 40 
3,170 75 




County Model School Inspector: 

John J. Tilley 

High School Inspectors: 

John E. Hodgson, M.A ■•• 

John Seath M A , LL.D. . 


407 10 

477 40 
420 75 




Toronto 










Total 

Grand total (all Inspectors) _ 








18,458 90 
124,250 36 



a. Also Inspector of Public Schools, Essex North. 



II. Diplomas for School Premises, 1904. 



Name of Inspector. 



T. W. Standing. 

R. W. Cowley 

Arthur Brown 

W. E. Tilley ... 

J. 8. Deacon 

D. Eobb 

Eobt. Park 



Jurisdiction. 



Brant .... 

Carleton 

Dundas 

Durham 

Halton... 

Huron E 

Kent, W 



"sill 

. OJ o> o 



Name of Inspector. 



Chas. A. Barnes.. 

D. D. Moshier 

P. J. Thompson 
H. D. Johnson.... 

Thos. Pearce... 

J. H. Smith .... 
D. Fotheringham 



Jurisdiction. 



cc v. bus 

"5-2 H 

«-. £ ° o 

ft 



Lambton, E. 
Lambton, W. 
Middlesex, E. 
Middlesex, W 

Waterloo 

Wentworth... 
York, S 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



69 



APPENDIX K— CONTINUATION CLASSES 1903-1901 



Inspectorate, 



Brant 

Bruce E 



Bruce W- 



Carleton 



Dufferin 



Dundas 



Durham 



Elgin 



Name of Principal 
and Degree. 



Arthur E. Green ... 
Charlotte Ballackey 
R. D. McMurchy, 
B. A 

A. M. Sheppard ... 

J. P. Loney 

E. U. Dickenson, 

B. A 

D. L. Strachan 

Jos. Stalker ... 

Jas. McPherson j 

Chas. Cameron 

Jno. Thos. Kidd j 

John H. Young 

Margaret Jt,. Stewart 
John A. Bush :....,.... j 
Kath'rine MacNabb 
Richard D. Lane ... 
W. Graham Lavery 

Muriel Payne 

Margaret Stephen... 
Mary D. Harkness.. 

Samuel Acheson 

"Wallace Pettapiece. 

Ernest Worley 

Janie Potter 

Jessie Potter 

Lina Argue 

Andrew J. Kerr ... 

B. E. Thackeray, 
B. A 

T. E. Langford, M.A 

Wm. Heath 

H. B. Fetterly, B.A. 

Geo. H. Steer 

Horatio Loucks 

Frank Anderson ... 
Gideon O. Barclay... 
W. B. Poaps 

D. Hampton 

Hanna Staples 

Frank F. Staples ... 

Becca Fair 

Gertrude Gardiner.. 

E. S. Williams 

Henry Wing 

Geo. Stewart 

J. W. Brown 

J. B. McFadyeu .. 

Geo. Dale 

Isaac McLean 

Laura Graham .. 

Arthur Curtis 

Annie McKillop 

T.H. Bell 

Geo. Priddle 

Martha Duncanson. 















o » 




■atn 


A 


/.'£ 






O ad 






8^ 


6^ 


Oh 


25 


I 


4 


I 


1 


I 


9 


I 


3 


n 


2 



Name of School. 



25 



1 \ 
II I 

I I 

1 

11 I 

III | 

III | 

II 

II 

III 

III 

I 

I 

i 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 
in 
in 

i 

i 
ii 

i 

i 

i 

ii 

in 

in 

ii 

ii 

in 

ii 

ii 

i 

i 

ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 

i 

ii I 
ii 
ii 
ii 
in 



S. Dumfries 



Class of School. 



1 11 Burf ord 



*Che3ley Village. 

14 Carrick 

U. 3 Amable 



t Paisley Village... 

Teeswater Village 

Lucknow Village 

10 Huron 

Tiverton Village 

7 Bruce 

16 Bruce 

?, Culross 

12 Culross 

14 Huron • 

2 Kinloss 

10 Kinloss 

X8 Fitzroy 

X Nepean 

11 Osgoode 

Hintonburg Village. 

6 N. Gower 

3 Huntley 

5 Fitzroy 

7 Goulburn 

1 Huntley 

Richmond Village ... 

Grand Valley Vill'e 
t Shelburne Village.. 

17 Mono 

Winchester Village... 
Chesterville Village. 

12 Winchester 

U18 Williamsburgh 

2 Winchester 

22 Mountain 

Millbrook Village ... 

15 Manvers 

12 Clarke 

9 Cavan 

15 Cavan 

5 Aldborough 

6 Aldborough 

Springfield Village... 

9 Southwold 

12 Southwold 

11 S.Dorchester 

10 Aldborough 

5 Dunwich 

13 Dunwich 

4 Aldborough 

2 Bayham ••• 

18 Bayham 

10 Dunwich 



12 | 1 



7 
4 
3 
3 

7 

Ifl 

42 
7 

43 

29 

37 

5 

4 

5 

41 

5 

5 

3 

4 

27 

21 

19 

10 

10 

9 

5 

5 

7 

4 

3 

3 

4 



5 ..:. 

I I 

74 | 1 | • 

" | | | 

5 I I ■ 



62 | 1 j. 

36 I i : 

35 
11 

12 

6 

6 

3 

5 

5 

3 

9 
11 
16 
34 
26 



1 I. 
1 • 



•I I 



•! • 

■! ■ 



•I J 
•! l 



1 • 



■ I i 



1 1 ! I- 



i ■ 

1 !• 



•I I 



'I I 



•I I l 



* Three teachers, two of whom are university graduates, doing Cont. Class work only 
t Two teachers, both university graduates, doing Cont. Class work only. 
t Organized January, 1904. 



70 



THE REPORT OE THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX E.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Name of Principal 
and Degree. 



1* 



2^ 

Ph 



Elgin, — Con. 



Essex N. 
Essex S- 



Frontenac 
Glengarry- 



Grey E.... 
Grey S 



Grey W 

Haldimand 



Haliburton, etc. 



Halton 



Hastings N 

Hastings S 



Huron E- 



Nellie Harris 

Agnes Murray 

Amy McGugan 

W. E. Van Velsor... 
J. 0. McLennan. . . 

E. P. Lewis 

Sara Jackson 

R. A. Catherwood... 
Nellie Moynahan ... 
Etta M. Stewart, 

B. A 

Agnes Johnston ... 
Hugh M. Beaton ... 
Fred. J. Voaden ... 

Wm. J. Elliott 

Marion J. Whyte.. 
Edith M. Maybee ... 

W. B. McEwen 

John E. Galbraith... 
Geo. B. Stillwell ... 

F. C. Lunan 

Thos. Allan 

J. E. Coombes 

Jas. S. Eowe 

N. C. Mansell 

W. J. Blakeston 

Chas. E. Stuart 

iJ. A. Graham 

jAlex. Firth 

A.. B. Cooper 

Dawson F. Aiken ... 

J.L. Mitchener,B.A. 

Ida J. Saunders 

A.. C. Bernath 

Geo. R. Coombs 

8. W. Kidd 

W. F. Inman 

,W. H. Stewart 

W. J. McClenahan. 
; Ida A . Ford 

E. T. Williams 

iJohn Bell 

0. S. Hicks 

: Lester Ross 

M. W. Mott 

Adam Kiernan 

A. B. Collins •• 

A. H. Musgrove I 

1. H. Cameron ...... 

Gilbert Summers ... 

John Hartley | 

Thos. G. Shillinglawj 

I. R. Torrance 

W. H. Downey j 

Elsie Allen 

Alex. McEwen 

Douglas Fraser ... 
Isabella Aitchison 
Thos. N. Forsyth 
Nina J. Isbister 



II 

II 

III 

II 

III 

III 

I 

II 

II 



1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 



1 \ 

Ij 

II | 

II | 

I 
I | 

1 

11 I 

I I 

III | 

III [ 

1 

. I| 
II j 

11 i 

11 I 

III J 

II | 
II | 

I I 

M 

i 
ii | 

i | 

11 i 
i | 
i I 
i I 

11 I 
in I 

ii | 

ii j 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

i 

i 

ii 

ii 

i 

i 

i 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 



Name of School 



8 Malahide 

1 Southwold 

4 Southwold 

7 Southwold 

I Southwold 

7 Yarmouth 

9 Yarmouth 

Port Stanley Village 

6 Sandwich S 

% Tilbury W 

*Amherstburg Town. 

"Walkerville Town ... 

Kingsville Town 

9 Colchester S 

9 Oso 

Maxville Village 

12 Charlottenburg 

Lancaster Village ... 

U5 Euphrasia 

8 Collingwood ••• 

*Durham Town 

Hanover Village 

Markdale Village ... 

5 Artemesia 

Dundalk Village 

Ul2 Artemesia 

II Bentinck ... 

1 Glenelg 

Chatsworth Village. 

10 Walpole 

3 Walpole 

17, Walpole 

Huntsville Town 

8 S. Himsworth 

2 Machar 

*Milton Town 

* Acton Village 

3 Nelson 

1 Trafalgar 

Marmora Village .. 
Tweed Village 

2 Sidney 

13 Sidney 

12 & 14 Thurlow 

29 Tyendinaga 

15 Hungerford 

*Wingham Town 

♦Brussels Village 

Blyth Village 

Wroxeter Village 

9 Tuckersmith 

7 Howick 

17 Howick 

1 Turnberry 

4 Turnberry 

9 Turnberry 

1 Tuckersmith 

?. Tuckersmitn 

7 Morris 



SZi 



4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
12 

36 

30 

20 

20 

10 
3 

15 
4 
5 
3 
4 

51 

34 

24 
8 

10 
6 
4 
3 

10 

19 

19 
3 

17 
6 
4 

47 

32 
6 
4 
9 

12 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 

76 

75 

23 
7 
5 

13 

10 
4 
4 
7 
5 
5 
5 



Class of School. 



\A 



I 1 I I" 

M [■ 

1 ! !• 

...i i i. 



i ■ 

if 



I'M 

I I 1 • 



I I- 



I i|- 



•I i 



1 • 



I I I i 

I ! I 

I I , 



1 I' 



i j. 
1 1. 



i 
i 
i 
i 



* Two teachers doing Cont. Class work onlv 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



71 



APPENDIX E,— Continued 



Inspectorate. 



duron W- 



Kent E... 



Kent W. 



Name of Principal 

and Degree. 







Is 


e 




O 83 


•M <p 




go 


oH 


Ph 


y, 



Louis C. Fleming... 

jfm. McKay 

Fred Eoss 

Wm, H. Johnston... 

Claude Bluett 

Wm. Geiger 

Wm. J. Taylor 

Olive Helyar 

Linda Milne 

Thos. G. Allen 

W. H. Eobinson 

W. B. Hawkins 

Will N. Courtice ... 
Frances E. McLean 

Harry E. Long 

Ella M. Patterson... 

L. L. McMath 

E. F. Stelck 

Geo. Baird, Sr 

D. McDougall 

Alex. F. McDonald 

H. I. Morrish 

Lillian Eobinson ... 
John E. Anderson, 

B. A 

Henry H. Kelly, 

B. A 

Clement Milburn ... 
Jas. G. Cameron ... 

<j. 33. Caldwell 

Eva Hunter 

Charlotte Hoig 

Flora Campbell 

Grant Nablo 

Jas. E. Newkirk ... 

Margaret Smith 

J. Scott Stephenson 

Lizzie Noack 

Lila Gregory 

Emma Bottoms 

Eliza Smith 

Edith Eey craft I 

Margaret Scurrah... 

Mary McCully 

| Stella Eowe 

^Duncan Johnston... 

Eobt. Watson 

Norman C. Willson 
Florence McDonald. 

Ethel Brown 

Albert Mahler 

Katha Johnston ... 
Jos. Morgan,* B.A... 

G. A. Miller 

I. S. McAllum 

C. Eoss McColl 

Beatrice Boulton ... 

Gordon Griffin 

H. M. Fleming 



I 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 

III 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 

III 

III 
II 
II 

III 

III 

I 

II 

III 
II 

III 



II I 

I I 

11 I 

11 I 

II | 

III | 

11 I 
III 

[i 

HI | 

II I 

II I 

HI I 

II | 

II | 
III | 

II- 1 

ii ! 

ii I 

ii | 
ii | 

in I 

ii j 

in I 

in I 

ii I 

i I 
i| 
ii I 
in I 
in I 
in I 
in i 




*Exeter Village .. 
Hensall Village 

4 Ashfield 

!4 Stanley 

5 Stephen 

16 Stephen 

3 W. Wawanosh .. 
IV W. Wawanosh.. 
11 E. Wawanosh. . . 

3 Ashfield 

Bayfield Village 

9 Ashfield 

16 Ashfield 

1 Colborne 

2 Coiuorne 

3 Colborne 

8 Goderich 

7 Hay 

1 Stanley 

6 Usborne 

4 W. Wawanosh .. 
6 E. Wawanosh .. 

16 E. Wawanosh •• 



Blenheim Town 



Bothwell Town 

6 Orford 

Thamesville Village. 

3 & 4 Orford 

2k, Harwich 

4 Harwich 

6 Harwich 

8 Harwich 

9 Harwich 

10 Harwich 

11 Harwich 

13£ Harwich 

16 Harwich 

1 Howard 



3 Howard 

7 Orford 

8 Camden 

3 Harwich 

7 Harwich 

2 Howard 

10 Howard 

13 Howard 

12 Howard 

1 Orford 

11 Orford 

5 Zone 

t Wallaceburg Town 

Dresden Town 

Tilbury Village 

5 Ealeigh & Tilbury E. 

12 Chatham 

11 Dover 

5 Ealeigh 



74 

11 
9 
7 

12 
9 
6 
7 
5 

11 
3 
8 
7 
5 
7 
5 
5 
4 
3 
6 
5 
3 
3 

27 

34 
32 
32 
12 
8 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
5 
10 
5 
5 
?l 
9 
8 
3 
4 
6 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
3 

78 
38 
20 
15 
6 
9 



Class of School. 



A 
1 




B 


C 


D 





1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

~1 


1 






1 


1 








1 






... 


1 








1 








1 








1 








1 








1 









1 








1 









1 









1 


1 

1 

1 
1 























i 




1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






1 








i 








1 








i 
1 









1 








1 


1 

1 














1 
1 






1 

1 1 
I 1 











i-- 

i 



* Three teachers doing Continuation Class 
t Two teachers, both University 



work only . 
graduates, continuation Class work only 



72 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX R— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Name of Principal 
and Degree. 



8^ 



c3 
. & 



Kent W.— Con... 



Margaret Mclsaae... 
jwm. S. Bell 

Belle P. Roxburgh... 

W. C. Dainty 

Lizzie Stewart 

Roger Hutchison ... 

Lizzie Wilson 

Louisa Palmer 

Maggie E. Rowe ... 

Carry M. Rowe 

Edna B. Slripp 

Nettie McKnight ... 

Eme E. Denhardt ... 

Minnie J. Bagnell... 

Berta Robinson 

Alice Estabrook 

Francis Tanton 

Libbie Cruickshank 

Jas. J. Wilson 

Mary E. Gordon ... 

Benj. Parker 

J. D. Williamson ... 

Neil McLean 

Maggie Logan 

Fran's I. Armstrong 

Maggie McKinlay ... 

Robert Dodds 

N. J. Kearney 

Lanark JR. Beatty_ 

[Mima A. Ellis 

J Mrs. E. J. Foley 

Ida Paul 

Leeds & Grenville 1 Jas. Magee 

A. Morton 

L. Earle 

Wm. Jones 



II 



Lambton E- 



Lambton W-. 



N. Dier 

Leeds ■& Grenville 2 Vina Cauley 

Jennie Page 

Libbie E. Thompson 



Leeds & Grenville 3 



Lennox & Add'gton 



Middlesex E 



(J. Edna Leighton.. 

Geo. Weedmark 

Jas. E. Burchell 

W. J. MacLachlan... 

Wm. J. Adams 

R. H. Hutchinson... 

A. Stevenson 

J. W. Wilson 

Louise Limbert 

J. A. Scott 

Mabel Merritt 

Jas. D. McDonald... 
Christina Howlett... 

Sara McMillan 

Flora McColl 

Olive Mclntyre 

Frances Cleveland... 
Mary Bell 



11 I 

H[ 

II 

II 
III 

II 
III 

II 

II 
III 

II 
III, 

n l 
III | 

III | 

I | 
I | 

11 I 

IT I 
II | 
II | 
II | 

11 i 
II 

II 

III 

II 

II 

II 

II | 

11 I 

I I 

11 I 
II | 

II I 

III 

II 

II 

II 
I 

II 

II 

II 
III 
I 
III 
III 
III 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 
III 

II 

II 



Name of School . 




Raleigh 

Raleigh & Dover 

Romney 

Romney & Mersea ... 

M. Tilbury E 

S. Tilbury E 

E. Tilbury E 

Tilbury E 

N. Chatham 

S. Chatham 

Chatham 

Chatham & Camden. 

Dover 

S. Raleigh 

Raleigh 

W. Tilbury E 

Alvinston Village . . . 
Oil Springs Village.. 

Enniskillen 

Dawn .'. 

Arkona Village 

Moore 

Wyoming Village ... 

Bosanquet 

Bosanquet ..„ 

Sarnia 

Sombra 

Thedford Village ... 

Lanark Village 

Pakenham 

Bathurst 

Ramsay 

N. Crosby 

Newboro' Village ... 

S. Crosby 

Leeds & Lansdowne 

Rear 

Bastard 

Kitley — ... 

& 3 Front of Yonge. 

Front of Yonge 

Merrickville Village. 

Cardinal Village 

Edwardsburg 

and 5 Oxford 

Edwardsburg 

Bath Village ..'. 

Amherst Island 

S. Fredericksburgh . 

Richmond 

Delaware 

London 

Dorchester N 

Dorchester N 

Nissouri W 

Westminster 

Westminster 

Westminster 

& 21 Westminster .. 



Class of School. 



A 

:::::: 




B 















:::::: 



C 

l 

i 

l 
l 
l 
l 


_ 

l 
l 
l 
i 








1 








1 








1 








1 


i 
1 






l 






l 




1 




i 


1 


l 
1 








1 








1 








1 


i 

i 






l 
1 








1 


1 










I 



l 
i 


1 








l 
1 








1 


i 




l 


v 








1 








1 


i 














1 








1 








1 











l 
l 


l 
l 
1 








i 








1 









1 








1 













* Two teachers doing Continuation Class work only 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



73 



APPENDIX E.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Middlesex W- 



Norfolk 



Name of Principal 
and Degree. 



Northumberland 



Ontario N 



Ontario S- 
Oxford 



Peel .... 



Perth 



Peterboro 



C. J. Bradley 

W. G. Robinson 

Mary McEachran ... 

Chas. George 

Cassie Mckenzie ... 
Annie McKellar 

D. J. McGugan 

Edna Stewart 

Jno. A. Armstrong 

J. A. Irwin 

Thos. J. Hicks 

Mary E. Trinder 

Mary P. Tisdale 

| Maggie Thompson... 
Ib. J. Wethey, B.A... 

Geo. Dawe 

Minnie Downs 

J. Givens 

Kate Fox 

M. Cameron 

Wm. Fallowdowne... 

R. J. Johnston 

M. Healey 

Harold Martin 

Blanche McPhee 

Maggie Thompson... 

Lettie Tipp. ... 

J. M. Kelly 

Richard Gaughan... 
Wm. Flummerfelt...! 

H. E. Kicker | 

C. A. Garthwaite ...I 
P. H. Henuershot ...j 

J. M. Scott 

H. A. Glaspell I 

C. W. Mil&urn j 

W. W. Hannah | 

M. B. Hugill ! 

D. McK. Forrester, 
B.A 

M. Alberta Robinson 

M. E. Ireton 

A. M. Burchell 

Louise E. McColl ... 

ueo. E. Hudson 

Cree Matthew ! 

John B. Dunbar ... 

S. 0. Stooaiey f 

Wm. Robertson ! 

R. Hall Cowie 

W. J. Ferguson 

Geo. Thompson 

J. L. Hart 

Jas. Stewart 

Hester Jickling 

|C. J. McKinnon 

Samuel Sample 

Maggie Huggins 

Sydney W. E. Hill... 
D. L. Somerville ...I 



11 I 
II 

I 

II 

II 

II 
III 

II 

II 
I 

II 

II 
III 

II 
I 

II 
III 

II 
III 

l'l 

II 

II 

II 

II 
III 
III 
III 

II 

II I 

II 
I 

II 

II 

II 

II 
I 
I 

II 

1 I 
11 I 
11 I 

1 \ 
11 
11 I 

n| 

i I 

ii 
in 

ii 

ii 

ii 
in 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

i 

ii 



o a 
. & 
oH 



Name Of School, 



15 Caradoc 

U16 Caradoc & Ekfrid. 

6 Ekfrid 

7 Lobo 

13 Ekfrid 

3 Lobo 

3 Lobo 

1 E. Williams 

Newbury Village 

Delhi Village 

6 Charlotteville 

13 Charlotteville 

12 Townsend 

22 Walsingham 

2 Percy 

2 Alnwick 

9 Percy 

Beaverton Village .. 

7 Mara 

2 Mara 

13 Brock 

Canhington Village. 

6 Mara 

2 Thorah 

5 Mara 

10 Mara 

9 Brock 

3 Mara 

4 Mara 

15 Pickering 

Norwich Village 

6 S. Norwich 

U3 N. Norwich 

D5 E. Nissouri 

U13 E. Zorra 

U21 Blenheim 

24 Blenheim 

5 Dereham 



3 [ Embro Village .... 

3 ill Blenhiem 

1 I *> E, Nissouri 

4 Bolton Village 

1 12 Chinguacousy 

2 19 Toronto 

2 15 Caledon 

3 Milverton Village. 
1 8 Downie 

1 5 Elma ••• 

2 JU4 Fullarton 

1 10 S. Easthope 

2 3 Mornington 

1 3 Blanshard 

2 (2 Ellice 

1 I 7 Elma 

2 10 Elma 

'I 3 Fullarton 

2 U6 Logan 

5 | Lakefield Village 

4 I Havelock Village 



i '■= 
V* 

13 

16 

8 

5 

3 

6 

6 

3 

3 

14 

9 

3 

3 

6 

M, 

4 

3 

17 

6 

5 

9 

6 

6 

8 

4 

3 

3 

4 

3 

4 

27 

11 

10 

15 

15 

11 

10 

5 



Class of school . 



4 j- 
12 |. 
10 I. 



•I 1 



■I I" 



*' 



1 ■ 

1 1- 

i j. 

1 1. 

i j. 



•I I 



■I* 1 



I I 






1 !. 



74 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX E.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Prescott & Russell. 



Prince Edlvard 



Renfrew 



Simcoe E. and W 
Muskoka 



Simcoe N- 



Simcoe S. W- ••• 



Name of Principal 
and Degree. 



W. L. Summerby, 

B.S.A 

C. M. Rowe 

S. A. Hitsman 

A. May Sparling ... 

F. B. Clarke 

Fred Adams 

J. E. Benson 

J. M. Root 

G. E. Smith 

Miss A. E. Colliver 

Geo. D. Ralston 

Geo. R. Wood 

Ida Lacy 

Jessie Muir 

Lila Mackie 

Hattie Wallace 

Archie Thomson ... 

Silverera Day 

Geo. Culbert 

J. A. Gillespie 

Sarah Preston 

Mary Proudfoot 

Alex. McKee 

Thos. A. Gowan ... 

Ira E. Clark 

Matthew Johnston. 

Thos. Hindle 

A. D. Campbell 

J. A. Speers 

A. A. Merritt 

W. L. Kidd 

Thos. Elliott, M.A... 

Geo. A. Clark 

J. P. Cowles 

Neil Christie 

Geo. Sutherland ... 
Geo. L. Thompson... 
John M. McGuire... 

Annie Wallace 

Chas. Deering 

Thos. Irwin , 

Jennie Fife 

Roy Hamer 

Gertrude Steele 

Gordon L. Fraser.. 

Eva Evans 

Libbie Evans 

Thos. Scott 

Robt. Little 

Chas. Asquith 

W. J. Mackay 

Florence Ovens 

Maggie Pollock 

R. M. MacPherson 
Herbert Schmielen 

dorf 



Ill 

II 

I 

II 

I 

II 

II 

II 

III 

III 

I 

II 

II 

II 

III 

III 

III 

III 

III 

II 

III 

III 

I 

I 

I 

II 

II 

III 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

III 

III 

II 

I 

II 

III 

II 

II 

II 

III 

III 

III 

II 

III 

II 

II 

III 

II 

III 

III 

III 

III 



Name of School. 



o p 1 



5 Cumberland 

Rocjcuand Village 

2 Russell 

2 Cumberland 

7 Hallowell 

17 Hillier 

2 Ameliasburgh ... . 

11 Ameliasburgh ... . 
10 Sophiasburgh ... . 

12 Sophiasburgh ... . 
Eganville Village 

7 Westmeath 

3 Admaston 

7 Radcliffe 

4 Ross 

1 Stafford 

7 Medonte 

12 Medonte 

13 Oro 

4 Medonte 

2 Medonte 

3 Stephenson 

Midland Town 

Creemore Village ... 

5 Flos 1 

3 Sunnidale 

9 Vespra 

8 Sunnidale 

*Alliston Town 

*Beeton Village 

*Stayner Town 

♦Tottenham Village... 

*5 Essa 

7 Essa 

3 Nottawasaga 

14 Nottawasaga 

6 Essa 

10 Essa 

5 Innisfil 

10 Innisfil 

4 Tossorontio ... 

1 Essa 

2 Essa 

3 Essa 

4 Gwillimbury W 

Gwillimbury 
Gwillimbury 

Innisfil 

Innisfil . 

Innisfil 

22 Nottawasaga 

27 Nottawasaga 

1 Nottawasaga 

13 Tecumseth ... 

14 Tecumseth ... 



W... 
W... 



9 

8 
9 
5 

12 
12 
7 
4 
6 
4 

11 
7 
4 
3 
3 
3 
5 
6 
4 
4 
3 
3 

30 

10 

24 

7 

5 

4 

62 

22 

36 

53 

38 

12 

13 

10 

7 

8 

6 

7 

7 

3 

4 

4 

4 

4 

3 

4 

3 

4 

3 

3 

3 

3 



Class of School. 



A 
| 


i 

B 

i 

1 

1 

1 


c 
1 

1 

1 . 


D 
1 




1 
1 

1 




1 


1 









1 

1 


1 














1 


1 

1 








1 
1 






1 
1 


1 








1 


1 
1 

:::::: 






1 
1 









\ 


1 
1 


1 
...... 



1 

| 1 


i 
i 
i 
i 

i 






i 






... 






I 






I... 




1 




I 
1 1 

1 

: 


1 

I-- 

• ■ • 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 


I-- 
| 

h ' 

|'"l" 

I * 

I 1 
| 1 

1 1 
1 1 

I * 
1 1 
1 1 

! i 
1 i 
1 i 
1 i 
1 
1 i 

















































































Two Teachers doing Continuation Class work only. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



75 



APPENDIX E.- Continued. 





Name of Principal 
and Degree. 


■3^ 

a * 

V/P 

to ".fl 

go 


a 

fi. 

1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
5 
2 
2 
2 

1 4 
6 

5 

4 

3 

5 
3 
2 
2 
2 
4 
8 
3 
2 

a 

2 

2 

3 

2 

1 

1 

4 

3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
4 


Name of School. 


d£ 
y, 

3 

4 

4 

15 

8 
13 

7 

6 

6 
20 

7 

7 

10 
10 
14 

7 

19 
12 
15 

'\ 
6 
fi 

4 

22 

26 

• 14 

11 
4 
3 

3 

24 

16 j 

4 

4 
17 
11 

8 

8 

9 

3 

4 i 

4 i 
* 1 

23 1 


Class of School. 


Inspectorate . 


A 


B 


i 

C l) 

| 


Simcoe, S.W.— Con. 


Henry Wffioughby 
Geo. Wilson 


III 

II 

II 

I 

I 

II 

I 

II 

III 

I 

I 

II 

II 

II 

I 

I 

II 

I 

I 

£ 

ii 

ii 

ii 

i 

ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
I 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 

in 
ii 

in 
ii 
ii 

in 

ii 

i 

i 

in 
ii 


10 Tecumseth 

5 Tossorontio 

8 Tossorontio 

3 Finch 

14 Roxborough 

3 Osnabruck 

4 Osnabruck 

9 Osnabruck ' 

15 Osnabruck 

Bobcaygeon Village.. 
Fenelon Falls Vil 

Ul Bexley 

Woodville Village ... 

Ayr Village 

Elmira Village 

New Hamburg Vil.... 
Bridgeburg Village- 
Fort Erie Village ... 
Port Colborne Vil... 

11 Bertie 

1 Humberstone 

9 Pelham 

U3 Pelham 

Drayton Village 

Palmerston Town ... 
Clifford ViTlage 

12 Maryboro 

6 Maryboro 

2 Peel 

7 Peel 

Erin Village 

9 Eramosa ... 

3 Guelph 

4 Puslinch 

3 Saltfleet 

5 Ancaster 

6 Barton 

2 Glanford 

9 W. Flamboro 

13 Beverly 


I i 








i x 




Andrew Kidd 






1 1 

i i 


Stormont 


Jas. Froats 

Edith M. Adams' ... 
Willis Sheets 


i i 
1 i 

1 

1 

i 

1 

l 




! i 













I-- 


Victoria E 


Clarence D. Bouck 

Geo. S. Mattice 

Maggie M. Robb ... 

Chas. Ramsay 

H. J. Case 

T. C. Bircnard 

Murray Wilson 

F. W. Thomas 

J. Corrigill 

P. H. Huyck 


i j 

1 i 

i 

i * 




Victoria W 


1 

1 


1 

1 I 

1 1 

i i 


Waterloo 

















I 


1 

i i 

1 



1 


1 l 

1 1 

1 1 


Welland 


C E. Hansell 


i 




Jas. Kirkwood 

D. W. McKay 

A.'W. Reavley, B.A. 
Elizabeth Notman 

Edgar Farr 

Robert Gant 

Geo. A. Campbell... 
J. H. Cunningham 

John A. <jray 

Isabella J. Glenn... 
Margaret A. Smillie 
J. T. Curtis 


I 

1 

I-- 

i j 

1 ; 

... I 1 


Wellington N 


l 
i 


i i * 

1 1 




■■": 

1 1 

1 1 

.1... i 1 




i ! !' 1 




Lizzie C. Hawken. 
Ernest L. Fuller ... 
Wm. J. Greenaway 
W. F. McKenzie ... 
Gilbert McEachern 
A. E. Wilcox ... . 


1 1 1 l 

1 1 1 


Wellington S 


1 1 x 

1 i 1 I"-" 

! 1 1 1 

I i i 




i ...| ....| 

! 1 1 1 


Wentworth 






Chas. H. Stuart ... 

Lillie Raycraft 

Hermann Jerome... 
Robt. E. Jamieson 
Mary C. Gilchrist... 

Laura Snannon 

Annie Kenyon 

Janet Gilchrist 

Waldon Lawr ... 


I 1 1 i 

1 i|-~ 

: 1 1 i 

i i 1 1 

i i 1 1 


York N 


3 Binbrook 

h Binbrook 

10 W. Flamboro 

13 E. Gwillimbury 


I 

I 

I 

1 


i I * 

I I 1 

i 1 1 

i i 1 

1 




T. H. McGuirl 


14 King 

Woodbridge Village. 
Stouffville Village ... 

3 Fort Frances Town 
Bruce Mines Town... 

1 Cobden 

Thessalon Town 

2 Thessalon 

Gore Bay Town 

Little Current Town 

1 Hilton 

Sturgeon Falls Town 
Sudbury Town 


to | ^ 

14 1 1 


1 1 

1 | 


York S 


Dun. A. Carmichael 
Jas. Hand 

J. W. Walker 


I 
27 | 

4 I 

I 

10 j 

35 | 

11 1 
11 |. 

3 |. 




1 1 

M 1 

1 i 


Rainy River and 
Thunder Bay ... . 


II ! * 


i 

1 

1 

1 


1 1 

1 M 

1 1-- 

M :••■•■■ 

1 1 !•••••• 

.. 1 1 1 


Algoma 


D. M. Christie 

H. F. Brackenridge 

Wm. Argue 

Miss F. Byrch 

R. 0. White 


I 
I 

II 
11 

I 

II 
II 

I 

I 
I 


4 
4 
4 
1 
4 
4 
1 
4 
4 
7 


Manitoulin, etc 


1 


1 1 i 




R. S. Fleming .... 


28 | i | 


! 1 

1 1 1-- 

1 i 




Jane Lusn 

a. W. Smith 


10 |. 

3 !• 


1 

| 


Nipissing, etc 


I 


i i 
1 JI-- 




J. G. Lowe 

W. M. Bradley 


12 1 !• 

14 1 1 




Copper Cliff Town... 


1 
4 I" 


....). 


I 
I- 


* I 






76 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX E — Concluded. 



Inspectorate. 



Name of Principal 
and Degree.: 




Name oi* School. 



Parry Sound W- 



R. C. Bilingual 
Schools, E.Ontario 

R. C. Sep. Schools, 
E. Ontario 

R. C. Sep. Schools, 
Central Ontario... 



R. C. Sep. Schools, 
W. Ontario 



Totals 1903-4 
Totals 1902-3 



Increase 
Decrease 



A. M. Curne 

John Hemphill 

P. J. McNaughton 

Angus Black 

John Laing 

Sr. St. Odile 

Sr. St. Raaegoude.. 



Sr. Ermst'ine .. 
Sr. St. Andrew 



Jas. E. Jones 

Sr. Gertrude 

Thos. P. Hart .. 

Sr. M. Ethelbert 
Julia O'Connor .. 
Mary E. Benn •• 

Annie Begley 

Anna F. Flynn .. 
Annie Noonan .. 
Mary Troy •• 



15 



Parry Sound Town.. 
Burk's Falls Village 

Chapman 

Humphrey 

Perry 

Rockland Village ... 
Gloucester 

Eganville 

N. Crosby 



Class of School. 



Mattawa Town 

Sudbury Town ... . 
Mara 

Amherstburg Town 

Ashfield 

Biddulph 

Raleigh 

Raleigh 

Arthur 

W. Wawanosh ... . 




* Two Teachers doing Continuation Class work only. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



77 



APPENDIX F. 

ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES TO COLLEGIATE [NSTITUTES AND HlGH SCHOOLS. 



Name of School . 



Entrance Examia- 
tion, June, 1904. 



Examined. Passed 



Collegiate Institutes. 

Aylmer 

Barrie 

Brantf orcl 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Clinton 

Cobourg 

Cjllingwood 

Gal^ 

Gcdericb 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Ingersoll 

Kingston 

Lindsay 

London — 

Morrisburg 

Napanee 

Niagara Falls 

Ottawa 

Orillia, 

Owen Sound 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Renfrew 

Ridgetown 

St. Catharines 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Seafoth 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Torontoi (Harbord St.).. 
(Jameson Ave.) 
(Jarvis St.) 

Toronto Junction 

Van k leek Hill 

Whitby 

Windsor 

Woodstock 

High Sehools. 

Alexandria 

Almonte 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

At eis 

Anro a 

Beimsvil e 

Belle- il e 

Berlin 

Bowman ville 

Bradford 

Brampton 



Name of School 



93 


57 


112 


78 


216 


144 


106 


90 


H4 


177 


72 


46 


74 


56 


91 


61 


134 


122 


95 


£7 


155 


133 


5 f 5 


4 86 


95 


65 


217 


184 


111 


89 


357 


377 


83 


47 


100 


81 


100 


SI 


420 


363 


98 


81 


180 


134 


93 


74 


168 


121 


116 


78 


77 


42 


85 


71 


130 


95 


191 


135 


161 


127 


£4 


52 


202 


140 


1G8 


1 75 


426 


344 


263 


213 


267 


| 278 


130 


| 83 


80 


45 


74 


62 


164 


115 


193 


158 



76 


38 


59 


44 


50 


41 


39 


29 


95 


70 


73 


58 


24 


17 


187 


123 


177 


151 


52 


46 


.53 


46 


74 


54 



Entrance Examina- 
tion, June, 1904. 



Examined. Passed. 



High Schools. 

Brighton | 

Caledonia j 

Campbeliford j 

Carleton Place j 

Cayuga ! 

Colborne | 

Cornwall | 

Deseronto I 

Dundas j 

Dunnville | 

Dutton j 

East Toronto J 

Elora | 

Essex ; 

Fergus. . i 

Forest j 

Fort William j 

Gananoque 

Georgetown 

G'encoej I 

Gravenhur3t | 

Grimsby j 

Hxgersville | 

Harr'st'jn | 

Haw; e;l ury | 

Ircquois 

Kemptville | 

Kincardine* ... i j. . . . ; | 

Lea '.ningtcn | 

Listowel 

Lucan I 

Midos | 

Markham | 

Meaf ord | 

Mi chell | 

Mount Forest 

N?wburgh j 

Newcastle I 

Newmarket 

Niagara; | 

Niagara Falls South j 

North Bay I 

Norwood J 

Oakvill© j 

Omemee I 

Orangeville | 

Oshawrj ! 

Paris .1 

Parkhill j 

Pembroke I 

Petrolea j 

Picton 

Port Arthur ! 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin \ . . . j. 

Port Hope 



23 


20 


42 


36 


69 


57 


65 | 


5J 


50 


34 


27 1 


24 


L09 j 


77 


36 1 


32 


49 1 


43 


75 | 


45 


65 j 


48 


50 | 


32 


24 1 


19 


51 i 


32 


79 | 


60 


5', | 


35 


47 


36 


84 


59 


54 | 


39 


64 | 


49 


58 


36 


31 


31 


70 


50 


25 


21 


37 j 


23 


68 | 


32 


75 


45 


781 | 


57 


69 


35 


95 


8 


93 


73 


50 


39 


99 


91 


67 


52 


58 


52 


59 


48 


b» 


?5 


15 


9 


54 1 


44 


25 


21 


30 


[ 25 


42 


35 


50 


35 


71 


54 


22 


19 


57 


36 


88 


75 


59 


51 


92 


59 


115 


65 


84 


52 


151 


99 


35 


33 


26 


23 


37 


33 


72 


1 60 



78 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX F. -Continued. 
Admission of Candidates to Collegiate Institutes and High Schools. 




High Schools. 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Pi escott 

Rat Portage 

Richmond Hill 

Sault Ste. Marie... 

Simcoe 

Smith's Palls 

Smithville 

Stirling 

Streetsville 

Sydenham 

Thorold \- 

Tillscmburg 

Trenton 

Uxbridge 

Vienna 

Walker ton 

Wardsville 

Water down 

Y\*aterford 

Watford 

Welland •• 

Weston 

Wiarton 

William stown 



Other Places 

Aberfoyle ■ 

Acton 

Alliston 

Alvinston 

Ameliasburg 

Amherstburg 

Ancaster 

Angus 

Apsley 

Arkona ...... 

Ashton 

Aultsville 

Avcnmore 

Ayr 

Bailieboro' 

Bancroft 

Bath 

Belle Paver 

Beaverton 

Beeton 

Belmont 

Be'hany 

Binbrook 

Blaokstock 

Blenheim 

Blyth •• 



71 

<?3 
75 
57 
63 
84 
92 
81 
30 
48 
23 
65 
22 
58 
65 
71 
44 
76 
24 
46 
63 
72 
55 
68 
47 
48 



27 
30 
57 
51 
38 
45 
35 
19 
3 

29 
11 
44 
47 
10 
13 
34 
45 
27 
29 
17 
33 
24 
27 
17 
79 
36 



57 
32 
53 
39 

55 
49 
72 
75 
21 
29 
"6 
-36 
21 
47 
57 
61 
18 
64 
18 
43 
51 
42 
38 
56 
42 
29 



24 

20 

41 

34 

28 

31 

26 

8 

2 

16 

10 

22 

33 

8 

12 
20 
30 
9 
21 
15 
25 
15 
17 
13 
56 
26 



Bobcaygeon 

Bolton 

Bothwell 

Bowesville 

Bracebridge 

Bridseburg 

Brigden 

Bi-ussels 

Burford 

Burgessville 

Burk's Falls 

Burlington 

Burritt's Rapid3.. .. 

Carnington 

Cardinal 

Carn 

Castlet-n 

Cataraqui 

Chapleau 

Charleston 

Chatsworth 

Chesley 

Chesterville 

Churchill 

Claremont 

Clifford 

Cobden 

Comber 

Cookstown • 

Copper Cliff. 

Court 1 right 

Creemore 

Cr?di f on 

Crsshill 

Cumberland 

Delhi 

Delta 

Dickinson's Landing 

Dorchester Station.. 

Drayton , 

Dresden 

Drumbo/ 

Dryden 

Dundalk 

Dungar'non 

Durham 

Egan ill? 

Eglin'on 

Elmira 

Elmvale,' * . 

Embro 

Erin 

Eyeter 

Fen el on Falls 

Finch 



■•I 



35 


30 


37 | 


24 


48 


37 


12 


7 


48 


42 


38 


24 


23 


13 


30 


28 


37 


29 


21 


18 


47 


31 


28 | 


26 


14 | 


11 


36 ! 


26 


32 


20 


39 


25 


11 


9 


23 


15 


7 


6 


37 


25 


28 


20 


47 


37 


44 


26 


23 


19 


19 


18 


12 


8 


43 


27 


21 


10 


35 


30 


16 


11 


19 


| 13 


22 


7 


19 


11 


32 


24 


43 


28 


40 


35 


43 


25 


31 


| 19 


41 


30 


31. 


27 


58 


! 51 


24 


1 17 


7 


\ 6 


37 


I 17 


42 


1 34 


90 


1 61 


66 


54 


41 


23 


25 


21 


49 


1 26 


45 


39 


45 


38 


68 


61 


44 


35 


70 


42 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



79 



APPENDIX F.— Continued. 



Admission of Candidates to Collegiate Institutes and High Schools. 



Name of School . 



Entrance Examina- 
tion, June, 1904. 



Examined. Passed 



Other Places. 



Fingal 

Fle3herton . . .. 

Florence 

Fordwich 

Fort Frances . . 

Galetta 

Glen Allan 

Gore Bay 

Grand Valley.. 
H.ili's Bridge. . 

Hanover 

Harrow 

Hastings 

Havelock.. .. 
Hensall . . .... 

Highgate 

Hillsdale 
Hintonburgh. . 
Homing's Mills. 
Huntsville.. .. 

Janetville 

Janeville 

Jarvis 

Jasper 

Keene 

Kilmaurs 

Kimberley. . . . 

K*ngs villa 

Kintail 

Kirkfield 

La 1- efield 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Laurel 

Lion's Head . . 
Litt e Current 
Little Britain.. 
London East. . . 

Lucknow 

Magnecawan 

Manitowaning. . 

Manotick 

March Corners. 
Markdaje. . .. 

Ma mora 

Marshville. . . . 
Marksville.. .. 
Marsville . . . 
Massey Station. 
Mattawa. . . . 
Maxville. . .. 

Merivale 

Merlin 

Merrickville 

Merritton .... 
Metcalfe 



66 

46 
26 
18 
24 
22 

8 
15 
23 

5 
32 
29 
13 
14 
33 
. 2 
3o 
53 
il 
31 
21 
15 
30 
24 
32 

9 
20 
19 
31 
14 
40 
61 
20 
11 
15 
15 
27 
134 
36 
11 

9 
17 

5 

26 
25 
24 
10 
12 
24 
23 
56 

9 

29 
33 
35 
35 



Name of School . 



57 
30 
15 
14 
17 
18 

8 
11 
18 

3 

20 
23 
13 

7 
25 
27 
21 
35 

9 
22 
14 
13 
23 
15 
20 

7 
14 
17 
27 
11 
29 

n 

15 

2 

9 

11 

24 

103 

28 

9 

3 

1C 

3 

29 

19 

10 

6 

5 



5 

28 

5 

2 S 

22 

25 

25 



Entrance Examina- 
tion, June, 1904. 



Examined. [Passed 



Other Places. 



Midland 

Mildmay 

Millbrook 

Milton 

Milverton 

Minrlen 

Moor efield 

Mount Albert 

Mount Hope 

Ncwboro' 

New Hamburg 

Neustadt 

New Liskeard 

North Augusta 

North Gower 

North Lancaster 

Norwich 

Oxkwood 

Oil* Springs 

Orond| 

Otterville 

Paisley 

Pakenham 

Palme s. on 

Parry Sound 

Pelee Island 

Pelham S. S. No. 2. 
'Penei anguish ene. . . . 

Plantagenet 

PlattsviFe 

Port Colborne 

Port Stanley 

Princeton 

Powassxn 

Queens ville 

Randwich 

Rainy River 

Riceville 

Richard's Landing.. 

Richmond 

Ridgeway 

Ripley 

Rockton 

Rock wood 

Rodney 

Rosemont 

Rosen eath 

Russell 

St. George 

St. Helen's . 

Sandwich 

Schomberg 

Schreiber 

Selkirk 

Sharbot Lake 

Shelburne 

Southampton 



30 


26 


4 


4 


10 


9 


11 


4 


23 


15 


25 


14 


30 


20 


13 


12 


31 


22 


29 ; 


23 


18 


14 


58 


30 


27 


17 


35 


25 


49 


26 


2 


G 


31 


22 


31 


15 


24 


11 


36 


27 


36 


33 


15 


9 


2C l\ 


18 


42 


30 


18 


7 


13 


10 


6 


4 


26 


12 


T 


3 


36 


22 


23 


18 


23 


19 


31 


23 


38 


27 


25 


14 


15 


12 


9 


6 


34 


19 


13 


11 


37 


29 


48 


23 


9 


6 


5 


5 


26 


25 


36 


22 


48 


35 


24 1 


20 



80 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX F— Concluded. 
Admission of Candidates to Collegiate Institutes and High Schools. 




Other Places. 



Sou h Mountain 

Sparta 

Spencerville 

Springfield 

Stayner 

Stoney Creek 

Strabane 

Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury 

Sutton West j 

Tamworth 

Tara | 



Tavistock. 
Teems eh.. . 
Tees water.. . 
Thamesville. . 
Thedford . .. 

Thessalon 

Thornbury . . . . 

Tilbury 

Tiverton .... 
Tottenham . . 

Tweed 

Uptergrove. . 

Varna 

Wallacaburg. . 
Warkworth . . 
Waubaushene. 



42 
24 
21 
36 
54 
33 
40 
28 
17 
23 
41 
33 
16 
11 
33 
39 
21 
38 
50 
44 
29 
41 
53 
32 
18 
42 
30 
59 



19 

17 
16 
20 
52 
28 
27 

12 
17 
26 
19 
13 
3 
26 
29 
14 
17 
17 
38 
17 
32 
38 
24 
14 
34 
24 
38 



Other Places. 



Wellington 

West L )ine 

West Osgoode 

Westport Separate School . 

Winchester 

Wheat ey 

Wi kesport 

Wingham 

Woodbridge 

Woodville 

Wolfe Islai d 

Wooler 

Wroxeter 

Wyoming 

Zephyr 

Zurich 

Summary : 

Collegiate Institutes 

High Schons , 

Other Places 



Grand total | 

Comparison with June, 1903 : j 
Increase | 



37 
32 
17 
39 
79 
•&\J 
26 
46 
23 
24 
27 
25 
18 
38 
10 
26 



6,795 j 
5,812 
7,167 I 



19 

25 
12 
25 
50 
17 
13 
38 
17 
21 
19 
14 
15 
26 
8 
20 



5,287 
4,338 
5,007 



19.774 I 1^,632 



716 | 



1,629 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



81 



APPENDIX G.— FREE TEXT BOOKS IN RURAL SCHOOLS, 1904. 



Inspectorate. 



Hastings N 

Lanark 

Middlesex W 

Rainy River & Thunder Bav 

Wentworth , 

YorkS 

Totals 



Name of school (section number and 

township) and amount expended 

for text books. 



6 Faraday, 17.85 

4 Lanark, $9.70; Ramsay, $17 50. 

6 E. Williams, $16.67 

3 Paipoonge, $21.50 

8 Barton, $12.68 

20 York, $17.11 

7 schools 



Total 

amount 

expended. 



$ 

7 85 
27 20 

16 67 
21 50 
12 68 

17 11 



103 01 



Total 
amount of 
Legisla- 
tive aid. 



$ 

3 92 
13 60 

8 34 

10 75 

6 34 

8 55 



51 50 



82 



THE REPORT OF THE 



^/ No. 12 



APPENDIX H.— PROCEEDINGS FOE THE YEAR 1904 

_I. Regulations ^anilXJiro^etasts^ __ 

Regulations of the Education Department, Approved August, 1904. 




Public Schools. 
Sites and School Houses. 

1. The site of every Public School shall admit of easy drainage and 
shall be accessible by the best highways in the section. Its area shall be not 
less than half an acre, and if the school population of the section exceeds 
seventy-five, the area shall be not less than one acre. The grounds shall be 
levelled and drained, enclosed by a neat and substantial fence and planted 
with shade trees. The school house shall be placed at least thirty feet from 
the public highway. 

2. There shall be a well or other means for procuring water, so placed 
and guarded as to be secure against pollution from surface drainage or in 
any other way. Every rural school shall be provided with a woodshed. 

3. The closets for the sexes shall be under different roofs. They shall be 
separated by a high, close board fence, their entrances screened from ob- 
servation, and locked after school hours. They shall be properly cleansed 
and disinfected when necessary and approached by proper walks from the 
school house so as to be accessible with comfort at all seasons of the year. 

4. Where the average attendance of any section for three years exceeds 
fifty pupils, a school house with two rooms shall be provided. An additional 
room and teacher shall be required for each additional fifty pupils in average 
attendance. Every school house shall afford separate entrances with covered 
porches and suitable cloak rooms for boys and girls. 

5. Every school room shall contain a superficial area of at least twelve 
square feet and a cubic content of at least 250 f pet for each pupil in average 
attendance. A uniform temperature throughout the room of at least sixty- 
eight degrees shall be maintained and provision made for a complete change 
of atmosphere three times every hour. The windows — both sashes — shall be 
adjusted by weights and pulleys and provided with suitable blinds. Light, 
where possible, shall be admitted from the left of the pupil. 

Furniture and Equipment. 

6. Every school house shall be seated with either double or single desks 
— single desks being preferred. The desks shall be fastened to the floor in 
rows facing the teacher's platform, with suitable aisles between the rows and 
with passages at least three feet wide between the outside rows and the walls 
of the school room. Desks according to the following scale shall be con- 
sidered as meeting all legal requirements : 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



83 





Seats. 


Desks. 


Age of pupils. 


Height. 


S,cg 


Length. 


i 


M 




I 


u 


6 

3 

53 
o 
Q 


<2 

OQ 


S'S. 
ttfSJ 


Five to eight years 


11 in. 

12 " 

13 " 

14 " 


10% in. 

11% " 
12% " 
14% " 


2 in. 

2 " 
2% " 

3 " 


36 in. 

36 " 

36 " 

* 

40 " 


18 in. 

18 " 


12 in. 
12 '• 


22 in. 


Eight to ten years 


23 " 


Ten to thirteen years 


20 " ! 13 " 
22 " 13 " 


24 " 


Thirteen to sixteen years 


26 " 











7. There shall be one blackboard at least four feet wide, extending 
across the room in rear of the teacher's desk, with its lower edge not more 
than two and a half feet above the floor or platform; and, when possible, 
there shall be an additional blackboard on each side of the room. At the 
lower edge of each blackboard there should be a trough five inches wide for 
holding crayons and brushes. 

Note. — The following directions for making a blackboard may be found useful: — 

(a) Where a brick wall is built solid, and also in case of frame buildings, the part 
to be used for a blackboard should be lined with boards, and the laths for holding, tjie 
planter nailed firmly on the boards. 

(b) The plaster for the blackboard should be composed largely of plaster of Paris. 

(c) Before and after having received the first coat of color it should be thoroughly 
polished with fine sand paper. 

(d) The coloring matter should be laid on with a wide, flat varnish brush. 

(e) The liquid coloring should be made as follows: — Dissolve gum shellac in 
alcohol, four ounces to the quart ; the alcohol should be ninety-five per cent, strong ; 
the dissolving process will require at least twelve hours. Fine emery flour with 
enough chrome green or lampblack to give color, should then be added until the 
mixture has the consistency of thin paint. It may then be applied in long, even 
strokes, up and down, the liquid being kept constantly stirred. 

8. Every school shall have at least one globe not less than nine inches 
in diameter, properly mounted ; a map of Canada ; a map of Ontario ; a map of 
the World and of the Continents ; one or more sets of Tablet lessons of Part 
I. of the First Reader; a standard Dictionary; a Gazetteer; a numeral frame; 
a suitable supply of crayons and blackboard brushes; an eight-day clock; 
shelving for baskets ; hooks for caps and cloaks ; and two chairs in addition to 
the teacher's chair. 



9. The Trustees shall appoint one of their number or some suitable 
person to keep the school house and premises and all fences, outhouses, walks, 
windows, desks, maps, blackboards, and stoves in proper repair. They shall 
also provide for whitewashing walls and ceilings if finished in plaster, (or 
for washing if finished in wood), every year during the summer holidays;, 
and shall employ a caretaker whose duty it shall be to sweep the floors daily, 
and wash them at least quarterly, and to make fires one hour before the open- 
ing of school, from the first of November until the first of May in each year. 

10. No public school house or school grounds, unless otherwise pro- 
vided for in the conveyance of the trustees, shall be used for any other than 

9 E 



84 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Public School purposes without the consent of the trustees, and no adver- 
tisements shall be posted in any school room or distributed to the pupils unless 
approved in the same way. 

11. — (1) The first Friday in May each year shall in rural school sec- 
tions and in incorporated villages be devoted to planting shade trees, making 
flower beds, and otherwise beautifying and improving the school grounds. 
Songs and recitations designed to cultivate greater interest in trees and 
flowers and in the study of nature shall form part of the exercises for the 
day. 

(2) Empire day, the first school day before the 24th of May, shall be 
duly celebrated in each school. The forenoon is to be devoted to a study of 
the greatness of the British Empire and the afternoon to public addressesi, 
recitations, music, etc., of a patriotic character. 

Duties of Pupils. 

12. Every pupil registered in a Public School shall attend punctually 
and regularly every day of the school year in which his name is so registered. 
He shall be neat and cleanly in his person and habits, diligent in his studies, 
kind and courteous to his fellow pupils, obedient and respectful to his teach- 
er, and shall submit to such discipline as would be exercised by a kind, firm, 
and judicious parent. 

13. Every pupil on returning to school after absence from any cause 
shall give orally or in writing to the teacher, a proper reason for his ab- 
sence. A pupil may retire from school at any hour during the day at the 
request, either oral or written, of his parent or guardian. A pupil may be 
suspended who fails or neglects to provide himself with the text books or 
other supplies required in his course of study, or to pay the fees imposed for 
such purpose by the trustees. 

14. Every pupil shall be responsible to the teacher for his conduct on 
the school premises or on the way to or from school^, except when accom- 
panied by his parents or guardian or by some person appointed by them on 
their behalf. Any pupil who injures or destroys school property or furniture 
may be suspended until the property or furniture destroyed or injured is made 
good by the parent or guardian of such pupil. 

School Terms and Organization. 

15. Unless otherwise directed by the Trustees, the pupils attending 
every Public School shall assemble for study at nine o'clock in the forenoon, 
and shall be dismissed not later than four o'clock in the afternoon. One hour 
at least shall be allowed for recreation at mid-day, and ten minutes during 
the forenoon and afternoon terms, but in no case shall the hours of study 
be less than five hours per day including the recess in the forenoon and after- 
noon, provided always the Trustees may reduce the hours of study for the 
pupils in the First and Second Forms. 

16. Pupils not registered in a Day School may attend a Night School 
from the 1st of October until the 31st of March. The hours of study in the 
Night School shall not exceed 2 J hours per session. Pupils shall not be ad- 
mitted to a Night School who are under fourteen years of age or who attend 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 85 



school during the day. Night Schools shall be subject to the same regula- 
tions as Public Schools, with respect to the discipline of pupils, the duties and 
qualifications of teachers, and the use of text-books. 

17. (1) The course of study for Public Schools shall be taken up in five 
Forms as hereinafter set forth, and pupils shall be classified by the teacher 
with respect to their attainments in all the subjects of the Form to which 
they are assigned or from which they are to be promoted. 

(2) The amount of time to be given to any class is to be determined 
by the teacher, who shall be guided in this matter by the inspector. 

(3) Pupils who have passed the High School Entrance examination and 
such other pupils as are considered qualified by the teacher and Inspector 
shall be entitled in both rural and urban schools to receive instruction *n 
the subjects of the Fifth Form, provided that in a municipality having 
a High School, if resident pupils of the High School are not charged fees 
for the first your, -*t will not be deemed obligatory for the Publi ; School 
Board to have a Fifth class. 

18. — (1) All the subjects prescribed for Forms I-IV of the Public School 
course are obligatory, except where otherwise specified in the programme of 
studies. No deviation from this rule is permissible without the concurrence 
of the inspector, who shall also decide as to the optional subjects. 

(2) The following subjects of the Fifth Form course of study are obliga- 
tory : Reading, Literature, Grammar, Composition, History, Geography, 
Writing, Arithmetic and Mensuration;, and Elementary Science. From the 
other subjects of this Form, Boards of Trustees may select, with the concur- 
rence of the Inspector, such subjects or such parts of the courses therein, as 
may, in their judgment, suit the requirements of their localities. 

(3) When from any cause, teachers properly prepared to teach the 
courses in Art, Constructive work, Clay Modelling, Elementary Science, 
and Nature Study are not available, the Inspector shall authorize such modi- 
fications of the courses in these subjects as he may deem expedient. 

(4) Classes in Latin, Greek, French or German may be provided in Fifth 
Forms or Continuation classes, with the concurrence of the Inspector, and 
with a time table approved by him. Teachers of these subjects shall hold at 
least a second class certificate and have passed a Departmental or a university 
examination in the language they undertake to teach. 

19. In school sections where the French or the German language pre- 
vails, the Trustees may, in addition to the course of study prescribed for 
public schools, require instruction to be given in Reading, Grammar, and 
Composition to such pupils as are directed by their parents or guardians to 
study either of these languages;, and in all such cases the authorized text- 
books in French or German shall be used. But nothing herein contained 
shall be construed to mean that any of the text-books prescribed for Public 
Schools shall be set aside because of the use of the authorized text-books in 
French and German. 

Continuation Classes. 

20. — (1) Under the provisions of The Public Schools Act, the course of 
study for Continuation Classes shall include the subjects prescribed for the 
Lower School of the High Schools (the former first and second forms). More 



86 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



advanced work of the High. Schools may be taken up if requested by the 
Trustees and approved by the Public School Inspector. 

(2) There will be four grades of Continuation Classes, viz : — (a) Schools 
in which the Principal holds a First Class Certificate (unless occupying the 
position continuously since April, 1899) ; (6) Schools in which there are at 
least two teachers and a class in regular attendance of at least 
ten pupils who have passed the High School Entrance examinations; 
Schools (c) in which there are at least five ; and (d) in which there are at least 
three who have passed the High School Entrance examination, and are in 
regular attendance. In Class (a) the Principal shall give regular instruction 
only to pupils of Form V or to those doing higher work. In the other classes, 
the teachers shall have such qualifications as are approved by the Public 
School Inspector. 

(3) No grant will be paid for a Continuation Class unless the Inspector 
reports that the obligatory subjects, whether prescribed for examination pur- 
poses or not, have received proper attention. The grant will be paid accord- 
ing to the nature and extent of the work done, and not on the results of 
examinations. In order that a school may obtain the grant, it will be neces- 
sary that the minimum number of pupils be enrolled during each month 
of the full academic year ending in June. 

21. — (1^ Public or Separate School Continuation Classes, of the highest 
grade [Reg. 20, (2), (a)] which undertake the preparation of candidates for 
any part of the District or the Junior or Senior non-professional examination 
for Public School teachers and which comply with the High School Regula- 
tions as regards equipment and the programme and time-table of studies;, 
shall be subject to the same examination regulations and entitled to the same 
examination privileges as are the High Schools. 

(2) When a class is organized in a Public or a Separate School for the 
preparation of candidates for any grade of teachers' non-professional certifi- 
cates, the Principal shall forward to the Inspector concerned, for his ap- 
proval, at once and thereafter and as often as the Inspector may direct, a 
report showing the qualifications of the teacher or teachers, the names of 
all the members of the class, with their age and standing, the courses and the 
time-table proposed, and a list of the equipment of the school (apparatus, 
library, drawing modelsi, maps, etc.) 

Note. — In Reg. 34 is specified the value of the equipment necessary for each 
grade of High Schools. On application to the Education Department a list may be 
obtained of the apparatus suitable for the different science courses of the Lower, 
Middle, and Upper Schools. The amount of the equipment required in the case of 
each class of schools is at the discretion of the Inspector; but, from the first, sufficient 
apparatus should be provided to enable the teacher to perform the most important 
experiments with the help of the pupils. The Inspector should also require each 
board to add to the equipment from year to year, so that, as soon as possible, work 
may be done in Physics, Chemistry, and Mineralogy, by the pupils individually or in 
groups of four at most. The work in Biology shall always be practical. 

Programme of Studies. 

22. Subject to any instructions issued by the Minister of Education 
from time to time, the requirements of each Form in the Public School 
shall be as set forth in Schedule I — Public School Programme of Studies. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 8?- 



High School Entrance Examinations. 

23. — (1) At every High School and Collegiate Institute and such other 
places as may be recommended by the County Council, an examination to 
be known as the High School Entrance examination to be conducted in the 
subjects prescribed for the Fourth Form of Public Schools, shall be held 
annually on examination papers prepared by the Education Department. 
The answer papers shall be read by the Board of Examiners constituted 
under The High Schools Act. 

(2) Every candidate shall notify the Public School Inspector concerned, 
before May 1st, of the examination centre at which he purposes to write. 

(3) The Entrance Boards of Examiners for a city may, however, with 
the approval of the High School Board concerned, prepare examination 
papers in lieu of those prepared by the Education Department, but such 
papers shall be on the same subjects, and the same scheme, and the same 
standard for passing shall be required ; or, with the concurrence of the Boards 
in charge of the High, Public, and Separate Schools concerned, such Board 
of Examiners, instead of holding an examination itself, may admit pupils on 
the recommendation of the Public or Separate School Principal; but, in all 
such cases the Board of Examiners shall satisfy itself that all the subjects of 
Parts I. and II. have been satisfactorily completed before admission is 
granted. 

24. The County Council may impose a fee not exceeding one dollar upon 
each county pupil writing at the Entrance Examination. Boards of Trus- 
tees may impose similar fees upon resident and non-resident pupils writing on 
the Entrance Examination at High Schools and Collegiate Institutes; but 
such fees shall not be imposed where the Board of Trustees authorizes the 
promotion of pupils to the Fifth Form of the Public Schools without passing 
the Entrance Examination. 

25. — (1) The subjects of admission to the High Schools shall be those 
prescribed for the fourth form of the Public Schools, as follows : 

Part I. — Literature, History, Art, Physiology and Hygiene, Nature 
Study. 

Part II. — Heading (written and oral), Writing, Spelling, Geography, 
Grammar, Composition, Arithmetic. 

(2) The literature of Part I. shall embrace the careful reading during 
the previous year of at least four suitable works selected by the Principal 
for each pupil, from a list in supplementary reading in English literature 
prepared by the Public School Inspector. 

(3) The written examination in Reading will be based on sight passages, 
and will be designed as a test of the candidate's understanding of what he 
reads. The candidate's knowledge of the selections for memorization will 
'also, as heretofore, be tested on this paper. 

26. — (1) No candidate from a Public or Separate School shall be admit- 
ted to the examination in the subjects of Part II. who has not been reported 
by the Principal to the Public School Inspector, on or before June 15th., as 
having completed satisfactorily the courses in the subjects of Part I. At the 
same time a confidential report from the teacher or staff as to the standing of 



THE REPORT OF THE N^Tl2 



/ 






their candidates, may also be submitted to the Public School Inspector for 
the consideration of the Entrance Board. 

(2) When a candidate has not been prepared in a Public or Separate 
School, the Public School Inspector shall admit him to the Examination for 
Part II., and shall report the circumstances to the Entrance Board, which 
will deal with such case as it may deem expedient. 

(3) At his official visits to each school, the Public School Inspector shall 
satisfy himself as to the efficiency of the provision for carrying out sub-section 
1 preceding, and, without his approval of the school, the certificate for Part 
I. shall not be accepted by the Entrance Board. 

27. — (1) The marks allotted in the Entrance Examination will be appor- 
tioned as follows: — Reading (oral), Writing, Spelling, each 50; Reading 
(written), Grammar, Composition., Geography, Arithmetic, each 100. Two 
marks shall be deducted for each misspelled word in the spelling paper, and 
reasonable deductions may be made for misspelling in the other papers. 
Deductions may be also made for want of neatness. 

(2) Any candidate who obtains 40 per cent, of the marks in each sub- 
ject and 60 per cent, of the aggregate marks shall be considered as having 
passed the examination. The examiners may also award pass standing to 
candidates who have not made a bad failure in any subject but who have 
made a high aggregate above the total required, or to other candidates for 
admission whose cases demand special consideration. 

(3) The decision of the Board of Examiners shall be final with regard to 
the admission or rejection of any candidate, but the Inspector may submit 
to the Board for re-consideration the complaint of any candidate or any other 
person with regard to the examination. 

28. In the interval between examinations, a pupil who has been pre- 
pared on a different course in another province or country, or a pupil who 
was unable to attend the Entrance examination, may be admitted temporarily 
to a High School by the Principal, with the concurrence of the Public School 
Inspector, if in their judgment, he is able to take up the work of the High 
School. A report showing the age and attainments of such pupil, with the 
reasons for his admission, and signed by the Principal and Public School 
Inspector,, shall be submitted to the Entrance Board at its next meeting. The 
Board shall then finally dispose of the case, and shall include the entrant's 
name in its report at the next annual examination. 

Leaving Examinations. 

29. — (1) Public School Leaving Examinations may be held annually in 
every Public School, having a fifth form, under the direction of the Prin- 
cipal, who shall consult the Inspector regarding the character and scope of 
such examinations. The preparation of the questions and the examination 
of the answer papers are to be left to the Principal, but subject to the advice 
of the Inspector. Pupils who thus complete satisfactorily the work of the 
fifth form may be awarded Public School Leaving certificates signed by the 
Inspector. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 89 



(2) These examinations shall be mainly of such a character as will show 
to the satisfaction of the Inspector that proper attention has been given to 
the subjects of the programme. No Public School Leaving certificate shall 
be granted by the Inspector unless satisfactory attention has been given to 
the subjects of Parts I. and II. prescribed for the High School Entrance 
examination. 

(3) The Board of Examiners for High School Entrance may accept such 
certificates for admission to a High School. 

High Schools and Collegiate Institutes. 

Accommodations and Equipment. 

30. — (1) The plans and site of every High School hereafter erected or 
remodelled shall be subject to the approval of the Minister of Education. 

(2) In all High Schools established since July, 1891, or to be hereafter 
established, there shall be a Principal and at least two assistants. 

(3) No new High School shall be entitled to receive any grant that does 
not provide at least the amount fixed by the instructions of the Minister of 
Education with regard to accommodations and the equipment recognized as 
the maximum in distributing the Legislative grant to schools with two 
masters. 

31. — (1) Any High School may be raised to the status of a Collegiate 
Institute when it is shown to the satisfaction of the Education Department 
that the trustees have provided : (a) adequate school buildings ; (o) equip- 
ment of the value and character recognized as the maximum in the case of 
High Schools with three or more masters; (c) four specialists, viz.,, one in 
Classics, one in Mathematics, one in Science, one in Moderns and History 
(one of whom or some other member of the staff being a Commercial special- 
ist and one an Art specialist) ; and (d) such other Assistants as will secure 
thorough instruction in all the subjects of the High School course as far as 
Senior Matriculation into the University of Toronto. 

(2) A Collegiate Institute may be reduced to the rank of a High School 
on the joint report Of the High School Inspectors, approved by the Education 
Dtepartment. 
♦ 

32. Every High School that complies with the Regulations of the 
Education Department shall be entitled to the following grants : (a) a fixed 
grant of $375 ; (b) in respect of school accommodation, a maximum of $100 
in the case of High Schools with two masters and of $150 in the case of High 
Schools with three or more masters; (c) in respect of equipment, ten per cent, 
of the total approved expenditure but so as not to exceed $160 in the case of 
High Schools with two masters or $320 in the case of High Schools with 
three or more masters; (d) in respect of salaries ten per cent, of the approved 
expenditure over $1,500 but so as not to exceed $600; (e) such amount pro rata 
in respect of average attendance as may remain unexpended of the grant. 

33. Every Collegiate Institute that complies with the Regulations of the 
Education Department shall be entitled : (a) to a fixed grant of $375 ; (b) to 
a grant in respect of equipment of $320; (c) to a grant in respect of school 



90 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



accommodation of $200; (d) to ten per cent, of the approved expenditure on 
salaries over f 1,500 but so as not to exceed $600; and (e) to a grant on the 
basis of average attendance out of any unexpended balance of the Legislative 
grant. 

34. In apportioning the Legislative grant on equipment, the maximum 
recognized inThe case of High Schools with two masters shall be as follows : 
Library, |300; Scientific Apparatus, $300; Maps and Globes,, |50; Models 
for Drawing, $50 ; Typewriters, $100 ; Gymnasium, not including equipment, 
$800. In the case of Collegiate Institutes and of High Schools with three 
or more masters the maximum recognized shall be : Library, $600 ; Scien- 
tific Apparatus, $600; Mans and Globes, $100; Models for Drawing, $100; 
Typewriters, $200; Gymnasium, not including equipment,, $1,600. 

35. — (1) The catalogue of the equipment shall be kept by the Principal 
of the School and shall be accessible to any officer of the Education Depart- 
ment. 

(2) The instructions of the Minister of Education in the matter of grad- 
ing shall be followed in appropriating the grant for school accommodations. 
See Eeg. 149. 

(3) No High School or Collegiate Institute shall be entitled to any Legis- 
lative grant on its gymnasium for any year in which the time prescribed in 
Reg. 41 for Drill Gymnastics and Calisthenics has not been provided. 

(4) On the report of a High School Inspector such reductions may be 
made in the grants payable upon the equipment, the accommodations, and 
the salaries of the staff, as the Minister of Education may deem expedient. 

Organization. 

36. — (1) In every High School or Collegiate Institute the head teacher 
shall be called the Principal,, and the other teachers Assistants. 

. (2) The authority of the Principal of the High School shall be supreme 
in all matters of discipline on the school premises where the Public and the 
High School occupy the same building. 

(3) The provisions of the Public Schools Act, 1901, and the regulations 
of the ^Education Department with respect to the duties of pupils attending 
a Public School shall apply to teachers and pupils of High Schools. 

37. — (1) The Principal of a High School or Collegiate Institute shall 
hold a Principal's Certificate and the Assistants shall hold High School 
Assistants' Certificates. Special teachers of Music, Art; Physical Culture, 
Manual Training, Household Science, and Agriculture shall possess qualifi- 
cations satisfactory to the Minister of Education. 

(2) If, after due advertisement, a High School Board is unable to obtain 
a legally qualified Assistant, a temporary certificate may be granted by the 
Minister of Education for the current half year to a suitable person on the 
application of the Board. 






1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 91 



38. — (1) The Principal shall determine the number of pupils to be as- 
signed to each form and the order in which the subjects in each form shall 
be taken up by the pupils. 

(2) The Principal shall make such promotions from one form to another 
as he may deem expedient; he shall also assign the subjects of the course of 
study among the Assistants. 

(3) No pupil once enrolled in a Secondary School (a High School, or a 
Public or a Separate School Continuation or Fifth Book Class) shaU be ad- 
mitted to another Secondary School unless he presents a letter of honorable 
dismission from the Principal of the Secondary School he last attended. In 
the event of a dispute, the parties thereto shall submit full particulars of the 
question for final settlement to the inspector of the school into which the 
pupil seeks admission. 

Programme of Studies. 

39. — (1) The courses of study in the High Schools shall be taken up in 
three main divisions : The Lower School, (a two or three years' course), the 
Middle School (a one or two years' course), and the Upper School (a one 
or two years' course). The Principal shall make such organization of forms 
as he may deem expedient. 

(2) The High School Courses of study shall be organized as follows : 

(a) The General Course; (b) The Commercial Course; (c) The Manual 
Training Course; (d) The Household Science Course; (e) The Art Course; (/) 
The Agricultural Course; (g) The Courses for University Matriculation and 
the Preliminary Examinations of the Learned Professions; (h) The Courses 
for Teachers' non-Professional Certificates. 

Note. — The programme of studies has been prepared primarily for the general stu- 
dent; but it includes the work prescribed for University pass and honor matriculation, 
tor the Teacher' non-professional examinations, and for the preliminary examinations 
of the learned professions. 

(3) The Board of Trustees shall select the courses on the report of the 
Principal; but a course shall not be taken up if, on the report of the High 
School Inspector, the Minister of Education decides that the staff, the equip- 
ment, or the accommodations are inadequate therefor. 

(4) The following subjects shall be obligatory on all pupils : The Lower 
School courses in geography,, arithmetic and mensuration, English grammar, 
writing, reading, and physical culture, with the English composition, Eng- 
lish literature, and history of the Lower and Middle Schools. 

(5) Pupils in the general course shall take in addition, the Art and the 
Elementary Science of the Lower School, with such other subjects of the 
High School programme as may be agreed upon between the pupil's parent 
or guardian and the Principal of the school. 

(6) Pupils in the special commercial, manual training, household sci- 
ence, art, and agricultural courses shall take the subjects that are obliga- 
tory on all pupils (see subsection (4) preceding), with such suitable modifica- 
tions as may be deemed expedient by the Principal and approved by the Min- 
ister of Education. 

(7) One of the courses prescribed in subsection (2) above and not more 
without the consent of the Principal^, shall be taken by each pupil ; but the 



92 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Principal may omit or curtail the course in any of the obligatory subjects in 
the case of individual pupils who are not preparing for examinations, and 
whose circumstances, in his judgment, deserve special consideration. 

(8) Subjects begun in one school division and continued in the higher 
may be reviewed therein as the Principal may deem expedient. 

(9) No subject prescribed for the Lower School alone shall be continued 
into the Middle or Upper School, but after March (and not before) the 
Principal may provide in the Middle School for the review of the courses 
in arithmetic and mensuration and English grammar prescribed for Univer- 
sity junior matriculation and the preliminary examinations of the learned 
professions, and in the geography prescribed for tte junior non-professional 
examination for teachers. 

40. The following shall be the average minimum amount of time to be 
devoted each week to each of the following subjects, separately from the 
other subjects, in the courses where such subjects are obligatory : 

(1) Reading. — Two lessons of thirty minutes each for two years in the 
Lower School, the average number of pupils in each class being not more than 
twenty-five and the time being increased or diminished when the average in 
the class is greater or less than twenty-five. In all the school sub-divisions, 
reading shall also be taken up systematically in connection with English 
literature. 

(2) Elementary Science. A lesson of thirty minutes every day or the 
equivalent thereof, throughout each year of the Lower School. 

41. — (1) The course in drill, calisthenics, and gymnastics is obligatory 
in Collegiate Institutes, and shall be taken up in lessons of thirty minutes 
each, three times a week, in each form of the Lower School. 

(2) Provision for Physical Culture shall be made in the Middle and 
Upper Schools also, but the amount and the character of the provision are 
left to the discretion of the Principal. 

(3) No pupil shall be exempted from the course in Physical Culture 
except upon a medical certificate or on^account of evident physical disability 
or of other reason satisfactory to the Principal and approved by the High 
School Inspector. In all the forms the sexes shall be separately trained. 

(4> During the months of May, June, September, October, and Novem- 
ber, the Principal may substitute for drill, etc., such sports and games as 
he may approve. 

(5) In High Schools having no gymnasium, drill and calisthenics shall be 
taken ur> at the discretion of the Principal as often as the weather, the accom- 
modations, and the adequacy of the staff will permit; and gymnastics may 
be omitted. 

42. The details of the courses of studv in each Form in Hisrh Schools 
shall be as set forth in Schedule II — High School Programme of Studies. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 93 



Examinations for Teachers ' Non-Professional Certificates. 

General. 

43. — (l) ( ) An examination for students intending to become teachers 
will be held annually by the Education Department, subject to the con- 
ditions hereinafter contained in the High School Programme of Studies 
at each High School and Collegiate Institute and at such other centres 
as may be approved. 

(b) Candidates intending to write should make application to the 
Public School Inspector before the 24th of May on a form to be obtained 
from him. 

(2) (a) At this examination there shall be three grades of teachers' 
non-professional certificates, viz. : District, Junior, and Senior. 

(6) The examination subjects for the different grades are set forth in 
detail in Regulations 46, 47 and 48, and the different subjects are defined 
in the Lower, Middle, and Upper Schools, respectively, of the High School 
programme. 

(c) One examination paper shall be set in each subject except in the 
case of Latin, Greek, French, and German, in which there shall be two 
papers — one in the authors and grammar and one in composition. 

(d) Except the papers set in Latin, Greek, French and German, the 
papers set for the Junior and Senior Teachers' Non-professional Exam- 
inations, hereinafter defined, will be different from those set for University 
matriculation, and the examiners will be instructed to set papers suitable 
for candidates who desire to become teachers. 

(e) At the examinations in English composition, an essay or a letter 
or both shall be required, to which special importance will be attached. 
Questions in Rhetoric may also be set at the Senior examination, but no 
candidate shall be passed who does not satisfy the examiners in composition. 

(/) In addition to passages from the prescribed authors, sight passages 
shall also be set at the examinations in English Literature, Greek, Latin, 
French, and German. 

(g) Every candidate for a teachers' non-professional certificate shall 
have read carefully during the previous year at least four suitable works 
in English Literature (both prose and poetry), approved by the Principal 
of the approved High, Public, or Separate School (Reg. 45), in which he 
has completed his course, or by other authority satisfactory to the Public 
School Inspector, in addition to those prescribed for the examination in 
English Literature. 

\(h) No practical examinations will hereafter be held by the Education 
Department as part of the departmental examinations in Science. 

t 



94 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



.Note. — Graduation diplomas may be awarded by the different High and Public 
School Boards on such bases as each may determine. The joint University matricula- 
tion examinations will be conducted by the Education Department as heretofore or as 
the papers — university or departmental — that will meet the requirements of their 
preliminary examinations. The results of such examinations will be communicated to 
may be hereafter arranged, and the learned societies will have the privilege of selecting 
such bodies as heretofore by the Education Department. 

(3) (a) Each examination paper shall be valued at 100. Candidates 
for District, Junior, and Senior standing will be required to make 60 per 
cent, of the aggregate marks prescribed for the examinations, as well as 40 
per cent, on each paper. Seventy-five per cent, of the aggregate will be 
required for Honors. 

(b) If, after all the answer papers are read, any examination paper 
should be found by the Board of Examiners, easier or more difficult than 
required, the minimum on the paper shall be correspondingly raised or 
lowered, and the total number of marks correspondingly increased or 
diminished. 

(c) Each candidate who makes the required aggregate may be awarded 
a certificate, even though he should fail to obtain the minimum in a sub- 
ject, provided he was regarded as fit to pass in that subject by the staff, 
as shown from the confidential report sent to the Department before the 
examinations. 

(4) A candidate for Senior standing who has begn duly admitted to 
the examination, shall be awarded a certificate on application to the Edu- 
cation Department of having secured Junior standing, notwithstanding his 
failure to obtain Senior standing, providing such candidate has obtained 
40 per cent, of the marks at this examination in the subjects of both parta 
of the Senior examination. 

(5) Candidates who fail at the Junior or the Senior examination, but 
who obtain a standing satisfactory to the County Board of Examiners, may be 
granted District non-professional certificates. 

(6) The standing of the third and fourth years in Arts after a regular 
course in any University in the British Dominions, will be accepted in lieu 
of Junior and Senior standing respectively. 

* 
44. — (1) At all examinations, a confidential report from the staff, or 
the teacher, as the case may be, as to the standing of their candidates will be 
taken into account in setting the results. Only the names of the candidates 
who, in the opinion of the staff, have completed satisfactorily the courses for 
the examination shall be included in this confidential report. 

(2) The certificate provided for in Reg. 49 (1) and (2) shall not be given 
by the Principal unless he has complied with all the regulations affecting the 
course and the time-table [Reg. 40 (1) and (2)] of studies for the examina- 
tion. 

Approved High, Public, and Separate Schools. 

45. — (1) At his official visits the High, Public or Separate School In- 
spector shall satisfy himself as to the character and extent of the provision in 
the schools under his charge for carrying out all the regulations affecting the 
preparation of candidates for non-professional certificates; and, without his 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 95 



approval of the School, no candidate therefrom shall be admitted to the 
examination for such certificates without examination in the subjects of Part 
I. for a District or a Junior non-professional certificate, as provided for in 
Regulation 49 (1). 

(2) At each inspection, the Principal shall submit for the approval of 
the Inspector the work of the candidates in Book-keeping and Business Paper3 
and in Art, and their note-books in Science. 

7. JtmWr Non-Professional Examination. 

46. — (1) The obligatory subjects for Junior non-professional certificates 
shall be those of the High School programme of studies as follows, and the 
examinations shall be taken in the same year : 

Part I. Reading, Book-keeping and Business Papers, Art, and Ele- 
mentary Science of the Lower School. 

Part II.— English Composition,, English Literature, History, (Ancient, 
British, and Canadian), Algebra, Geometry, Physics, and Chemistry of the 
Middle School, with the Geography of the Lower School and the Lower and 
special Middle School courses in English Grammar and Arithmetic and Men- 
suration. 

(2) For the Junior non-professional teachers' certificate, candidates will 
not be required to take any foreign language; but candidates at the examina- 
tion for this grade of certificate who take also the papers in the Lower and 
Middle school courses in Latin (the pass matriculation course) at the July 
departmental examinations of the same year, and who make at least 34 per 
cent, on each of such Latin papers and 50 per cent, of the aggregate of the 
marks assigned to both papers (the composition, and the authors' and gram- 
mar papers) shall have the marks so obtained counted as part of the 60 per 
cent, required on the aggregate of the obligatory subjects. 

77. Senior Non-Professional Examination. 

47. The subjects of examination shall be those prescribed for the Up- 
per School of the High Schools, and the examinations may be taken at one 
time or in two parts at different times, as follows : 

Part I. — English Composition and Rhetoric, English Literature, Mediae- 
val History, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometrv, and Physics. 

Part II. — History (Modern and British), Biology, Latin, with Chemistry 
and Mineralogy, or French and German, or Greek and German, or Greek and 
French. 

777. District Non-Professional Examination. 

48. — (1) When, ^ in the opinion of the County Board of Examiners, the 
standard of the Junior non-professional examination for teachers is too high 
for the condition of the county or district or any part thereof, the Minister 
of Education may authorize the issue of District certificates ; but the exam- 
inations therefor shall be held only in such counties or districts and the pro- 
fessional certificates based thereon shallbe valid only for such schools as 
each County Board may designate. 



96 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(2) The report of the Board shall set forth in full detail the reasons for 
the Board's recommendation, and in particular, the assessed value and special 
circumstances of the school section concerned. 

(3) The subjects for District teachers' non-professional certificates shall 
be those of the Lower School of the High Schools; and for the purposes of 
this examination, these subjects shall be divided into two parts and the 
examinations shall be taken in the same year, as follows : 

Part I. — Reading, Book-keeping, and Business Papers, Art, and Ele- 
mentary Science. 

Part II. — English Literature, Geography, Spelling, Composition, Eng- 
lish Grammar, History, (British and Canadian), Arithmetic and Mensuration, 
Algebra, and Geometry. 

(4) The examination papers will be set and the results settled by the 
Education Department ; but the County Board of Examiners shall settle final- 
ly the results of the examinations of teachers in localities where French or 
German is spoken in addition to English. 

(5) The texts for the examination in English Literature in Part II. will 
be prescribed by the Education Department from year to year. The Geo- 
metry for this examination shall consist of the practical course prescribed 
for the Lower School of the High Schools, and of the propositions in Euclid 
as detailed in Schedule C. 

Special Conditions of Admission. 

49. — (1) A candidate from an approved High, Public or Separate School 
shall be admitted to the examination in Part II. for a District or a Junior 
non-professional certificate, without examination in Part I., provided the 
Principal of the school in which he completed the subjects thereof, certifies 
to the Public School Inspector concerned that the candidate has completed 
them satisfactorily. 

(2) A candidate for a Senior non-professional certificate shall not be 
admitted to the examination therefor unless he presents to the Public School 
Inspector (a) the certificate that he already holds Junior standing, or (b) the 
certificate~6f competency in the subjects of Part I. required from candidates 
at the Junior examination, and also a certificate from the Principal' in whose 
school he completed his High School Middle School course, that he has com- 
pleted satisfactorily the course prescribed for Part II. of the Junior examina- 
tion. 

(3) All other candidates than those whose qualifications have been cer- 
tified to by the Principal, as provided in subsections (1) and (2) preceding, 
shall pass both parts of the departmental written examinations for District 
and Junior non-professional certificates, as the case may be; but candidates 
who fail at the examination for either part shall be allowed the privilege of 
subsequently securing the required standing therein. 

(4) Before being admitted to any of the examinations, all candidates 
shall in addition satisfy the Public School Inspector to whom they submit 
their applications, by certificate from the Principal of the approved School 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 97 



, 



in which they completed the course for the examination or by other credible 
testimony, that they have taken up practically the course in Science prescrib- 
ed for the examinations to which they desire to be admitted, and that they 
have read the four works in English Literature as provided in Regulation 43 
(2) (g) preceding. 

Interim Provisions for 1905 and 1906. 

'50. The Public and High School Courses of Study and the scheme of 
Departmental Examinations as herein prescribed, shall take effect forthwith, 
except as follows : 

(1) Public School Inspectors shall have discretionary powers in dealing 
with the introduction of the new subjects into the Public Schools. 

(2) Until these new subjects are fully introduced, High School En- 
trance Boards shall also have discretionary powers in dealing with such sub- 
jects at the Entrance Examinations. 

(3) At the examination for Part II. junior non-p|r?ofessional Public 
School Teachers' certificates in 1905, the subjects and standards rhall be as 
fcHows : English Grammar^ English Composition, English Literature, Geo- 
graphy, History (Ancient, British and Canadian), Arithmetic and Mensura- 
tion, Algebra, Geometry, Physics, and either (a) Chemistry or (/>) Latin with 
one of Greek, French, German, Chemistry; the standard be : ng wish option 
(a) 34 per cent, of each subject and 60 per cent, of the aggregate, and with 
option (6) 34 per cent, of each subject and 50 per cent, of the aggregate. The 
Course of Study in each subject shall be that herein prescribed, except in 
Geometry, in which the course shall be that prescribed for the Junior Leav- 
ing Examination of 1904. (For details see appendix E). At this (1905) Ex- 
amination also a Part II. Junior non-professional Teachers' certificate will 
give full standing, if endorsed and certified to by any High School Principal 
or Public School Inspector with a statement that the holder has taken the re- 
quired curse in Drawing, Book-keeping, Reading and Botany or Agriculture 
previously prescribed for Part I. Junior Leaving standing. In 1905 no examin- 
ation will be held in the subject of Part I. For the examination of 1906, the 
teachers' certificate as 10 the candidate's competency in the subjects of Part 
I. of the Junior Examination shall require only one year's course in each of 
Botany and Zoology, and in Art. 

(4) At the examination for Senior non-professional Public School Teach- 
ers' Certificates in 1905 and in 1906, the subjects and standards shall be those 
prescribed for the Senior Leaving examination of 1904, viz: Part I., Eng- 
lish Composition and Ehetoric, English Literature, Algebra, Geometry, 
Trigonometry, English and Ancient History; and Part II., Latin, Physics, 
and one of the following groups, (a) French and Greek, (6) German and 
Greek, (c) French and German, (d) French and Chemistry, (e) German and 
Chemistry, (/) Biology and Chemistry; the standard being 34 per cent, of 
each subject and 50 per cent, of the aggregate of marks. At this examina- 
tion m 1905 and in 1906 the courses of study in Geometry, History, 
and Science shall be those prescribed for Senior standing in 1904 (For de- 
tails see appendix E.); but, in all the other subjects, the courses shall be 
thoBe herein prescribed. 



98 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



. (5) At the examination for District Certificates in 1905 candidates shall 
pass an examination in the following' subjects as defined in the courses of 
study for the Lower School of the High Schools and in appendix E : Eng- 
lish Grammar, English Literature, English Composition, Arithmetic and 
Mensuration, Algebra, Geometry, History, Geography, and Spelling; but any 
certificate obtained on the above examination will give the non-professional 
standing required for a District certificate only when endorsed by a Public 
School Inspector or High School Principal with a statement to the effect that 
the holder thereof has completed satisfactorily the courses of study in Read- 
ing, Drawing; Book-keeping, and Botany or Agriculture heretofore prescrib- 
ed for Form I. of the High Schools. The standard for this (1905) examina- 
tion shall be 34 per cent, of the marks assigned to each paper and 50 per cent, 
of the aggregate marks. 

Specialists' Standing. 

51. — (1) Any person who obtains a degree in Arts in the honor depart- 
ment of Mathematics, Science, Classics, English and History, Moderns and 
History, or French and German, as specified in the calendar of any Univer- 
sity in Canada and accepted by the Education Department, who has graduat- 
ed with at least second class honors (or 66 per cent, in each subject of such 
honor department) and who has been in actual attendance in such depart- 
ment at a University for not less than two academic years, shall be entitled 
to the non-professional qualification of a Specialist in such department. 

(2) A graduate who has not taken an Honor Degree in one of the above 
courses shall be entitled to the non-professional standing of a Specialist, on 
submitting to the Education Department a certificate from the Registrar of 
the University, that he has passed, subsequently to graduation, the examina- 
tions prescribed for each year of the Honor course of the department in 
which he seeks to be recognized as a Specialist, or any examinations which 
are recommended by the University as equivalent thereto and accepted as 
such by the Education Department ; and that he has been in actual attendance 
in such department at a University for not less than two academic years in 
preparation for the examinations therefor. 

52. Any person who passes the examination in the subjects set forth in 
Circular ISTo. 2. — Courses for Commercial and Art Specialists — (each paper 
being valued at 100, and the standard being 40 per cent, in each and 60 per 
cent, of the aggregate, with 75 per cent, in honors), and who is the holder of a 
High School Assistants' Certificate, shall be entitled to an interim Com- 
mercial or Art Specialist's Certificate. 

Examination and Other Fees. 

53. The fees authorized by the Education Department shall be as fol- 
lows : Candidates for the Entrance Examination, if so ordered by the Board 
of Trustees or the County Council, $1 ; District Certificate, $5 ; Junior Teach- 
ers' Examination, f 5;. Part I. Senior Teachers' Examination, $3; Part II. 
Senior Teachers' Examination, $3; Junior Matriculation, $5; Senior Teach- 
ers' Examination, at one examination, |5 ; Commercial and Art Specialists' 
each $5; Part I. Junior Teachers' Examination when taken alone, $3; for 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 99 



Candidates for examination in one or more subjects only (not exceeding four), 
for the purpose of completing a course for pass Matriculation into any Univer- 
sity or Learned Profession, |2; Tuition, County Model School, when so order- 
ed by the Board of Trustees, |5 ; Kindergarten Assistants, $3; Directors, |5; 
Examination Normal School, $10; Examination Normal College, $15; Ap- 
peals of all kinds, $2. (Fee to be refunded if the appeal is sustained.) 

Kindergartens . 

54. No person shall be appointed to take charge of a Kindergarten who 
has not passed the examination prescribed for Director of Kindergartens. 
No person shall be admitted to the course in training prescribed for Assist- 
ants who is not 18 years of age and who has not Junior Teacher's non-profes- 
sional or Junior Matriculation standing, or who has not successfully pursued 
the High School Lower and Middle School courses. Any person who has 
taken the equivalent of such a course at some other educational institution 
may, on the recommendation of the Inspector and with the consent of the 
Minister of Education, be admitted to training. No person shall be ad- 
mitted to the course prescribed for a Director who has not pursued the course 
prescribed for an Assistant. 

55. — (1) Any person who attends a Kindergarten for one year and satis- 
factorily completes the course prescribed for Assistants shall, on the re- 
commendation of the Director of such Kindergarten endorsed by the Public 
School Inspector or by the Principal of the Normal School where the course 
is pursued at one of the Provincial Kindergartens, be entitled to an Assist- 
ant's certificate, valid for two years. 

(2) The holder of an Assistant's certificate or the holder of a Second Class 
Provincial certificate on attending a Provincial Kindergarten for one year 
and on passing the prescribed examinations shall be entitled to a Director's 
certificate. 

56. — (1) The examination for Directors shall include Psychology and the 
general principles of Froebel's system, History of Education, Theory and 
Practice of the Gifts and Occupations, Mutter ancl Kose-Leider, Botany and 
Natural History, Miscellaneous Topics, including discipline and methods of 
morning talks, each, 100; Practical Teaching. 500; Book work, 400. There 
shall also be sessional examinations in Music, Drawing and Physical Culture, 
each valued at 50. 

(2) The examination for Assistants shall include Theorv and Practice 
of the Gifts, Theory and Practice of the Occupations, Miscellaneous Topics, 
including the general principles of Froebel's System and their application 
to songs, games, elementary science, morning talks and discipline, each 
valued at 100. 

(3) There shall be at least two sessional examinations and one final 
examination conducted by the staff and the Principal of the Normal School, in 
the case of Directors, and by the Staff and the Public School Inspector in the 
case of Assistants. 

(4) Candidates for the Director's or the Assistant's Certificate must obtain 
40 per cent, of the marks assigned to each subject and 60 per cent, of the ag- 

10 E 



100 THE REPORT OF THE No, 12 



gregate marks, the sessional and final examinations being taken together. 
Seventy-five per cent of the aggregate will be required for honors. 

County and Gity Model Schools. 

57. The Board of Examiners for every County, or the trustees of any 
city, with the approval of the Minister of Education, may set apart at least 
one Public School for the professional training of third-class teachers. The 
Principal of such school shall be the holder of a first-class certificate from the 
■Education Department and shall have at least three years' experience as a 
Public School Teacher. In every Model School there shall be at least three 
assistants on the staff who shall be the holders of first or second-class certifi- 
cates. The County Board of Examiners shall distribute the teachers-in- 
training among the County Model Schools as may be deemed expedient. 

58. The Model School term shall begin on the second day of September 
and shall close on the 15th day of December. During the term the Prin- 
cipal of the Public School to which the Model School is attached shall be 
relieved of all Public School duties except the management and supervision 
of the Public School. The assistants shall give such instruction to the 
teachers-in-training as may be required by the Principal or by the regula- 
tions of the Education Department. There shall be a room for the exclusive 
use of the teachers-in-training either in the Public School buildings or else- 
where equally convenient. 

59. Application for admission to a Model School shall be made to the 
Inspector not later than the twenty-fifth of August. Any person who has a 
full Junior Teachers' Non-professional Certificate, - or a District Non-profes- 
sional Certificate, or who is considered eligible by the Board of Examiners 
for a District certificate and who will be eighteen years of age before the close 
of the term may be admitted as a teacher-in-training. The teachers in train- 
ing shall be subject to the discipline of the Principal with an appeal in case 
of dispute to the Chairman of the County Board of Examiners. Boards of 
trustees may impose a tuition fee, not exceeding $5, on each teacher in 
training. 

60. The course of study in Model Schools shall consist of instruction in 
School Management, to be valued for examination purposes at 100; in- 
struction in the Science of Education, 100 ; instructions in the best methods 
of teaching all the subjects on the Public School Course of Study, four papers, 
100 each; instructions in the School Law and Regulations so far as they 
relate to the duties of the teachers and pupils, instruction in Reading, School 
Hygiene, Music, Art and Physical Culture, 50 each; and such practice in 
teaching as will cultivate correct methods of presenting subjects to a class and 
develop the art of school government. The final examination of the Educa- 
tion Department will be limited to School Management, the Science of Educa- 
tion, School Law and Regulations and Methods in Spelling, Literature, Com- 
position, Grammar, History, Geography, Arithmetic and Mensuration, and 
Penmanship. 

61. The Principal of the School shall submit to the Board of Examin- 
ers a report with respect to the standing of every teacher-in-training, having 
regard to his conduct during the Session, his knowledge of the Public School 
Course of Study, his aptitude as a teacher, his powers of discipline and gov- 
ernment in the school room and such other qualities as in the opinion of the 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 101 



Principal are necessary to a successful teacher. The Principal shall also 
report the standing of each teacher-in-training in the subjects of Hygiene, 
Music, Physical Culture, and Art and Nature Study (both after 1904), as 
determined by at least one Sessional examination. These reports shall be 
considered by the Board of Examiners at the final examination in estimating 
the standing of the candidates for certificate. 

62. During the last week of the Session, the County Board of Examiners 
shall require each teacher-in-training to teach in the presence of such mem- 
bers of the Board as may be appointed for that purpose, two lessons of 
twenty minutes each, one of which shall be assigned by the presiding examiner 
one day, and the other forty minutes before it is to be taught. The lessons 
shall be valued at 100 each, shall be appraised by different examiners, and 
shall not be taught in the same Form or in the same subject. The Board of 
Examiners shall also submit the candidates to a practical test of their ability 
to place upon the blackboard with neatness and despatch any exercise for 
pupils they may deem expedient. The time allowed for such a test shall 
not exceed ten minutes and the valuation 50 marks. 

i 

63. Any teacher- in-training having the full Junior Teachers' non-pro- 
fessional standing who obtains forty per cent, of the marks assigned to each 
subject (including practical teaching) and sixty per cent, of the aggregate 
shall be awarded a Third class certificate valid for three years. At the re- 
quest of the County Board, when there is a scarcity of teachers, and with the 
permission of the Minister of Education, a certificate for a shorter period and 
valid only within the jurisdiction of the County Board, to be known as a 
District certificate, may be awarded to teachers-in-training who obtain a 
lower percentage, or to such other persons whose non-professional standing 
would entitle them onlv to District certificate. The Board may reiect 
any candidate whose scholarship, on the report of the Principal or of an Ex- 
aminer, appears to be defective. The decision o± the Board with respect to 
the examination shall be final. 

District Model Schools. 

64. The Minister of Education may set apart two Public Schools in 
each >>f the Districts of Thunder Bay, Algoma, Parry Sound, and Nipissing, 
as Model Schools for candidates for District certificates. No school shall 
rank as a Dislrict Model School unless it has a Continuation Cla3s of the 
highest grade, and unless the staff consists of at least three teachers, viz : a 
Principal holding a first-class certificate and at least one of his assistants 
holding a second-class certificate. Teachers-in-training at District Model 
Schools shall take the course of study and the final examinations prescribed 
for District Certificate examinations. Candidates for teachers' certificates at 
the District Model School Examinations shall be at least eighteen years of 
age, and shall take such a course of professional training in the subjects pre- 
scribed for County Model Schools as the Inspector of the District may direct. 

65. In cities and counties where the French or German language pre- 
vails, the Board of Examiners, with the approval of the Education Department 
may establish a Model School for the training of teachers of French or Ger- 
man origin ; such schools shall hold one term each year, viz : From the first 
of September to the first of July. The course of study shall be the non-pro- 
fessional course required for a District certificate and the professional course 



102 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



required for a County Model School. The examination in English shall be 
conducted on the papers prescribed for the District certificate. The examina- 
tion in French or German shall be limited to Reading, Grammar, and Com- 
position and may be both oral and written. The papers in French and Ger- 
man shall be prepared by the Board of Examiners. The Board may submit 
the teachers in training to such an examination on the professional course as 
it deems expedient. 

Provincial Normal and Model Schools. 

66. The session of the Normal Schools will extend from the second 
Tuesday in September in each year to the third Friday in June^of the year 
following, and will consist of two terms. The first term will begin on the 
second Tuesday in September and end on the eighteenth day, of December of 
the same year. The second term of the session will begin on the seventh day 
of January of the following year and end on the third Friday in June. 

67. — (1) Any student with the full Senior Teachers' non-professional 
standing, or any teacher who has at least full Junior Teachers' non-profes- 
sional standing and who has taught a public school successfully for one year or 
who after passing the County Model School examination has taught for six 
months under the supervision of the Inspector of a city having a Model School 
maybe admitted as a Normal. School student. Every applicant for admission 
shall be required to produce a medical certificate of freedom from serious 
puiirtnary affections and from seriously defective eyesight and hearing, a]so 
a certificate of good moral character. The above-specified certificates are to 
be presented to the Principal on the opening day. 

(2) Application for admission is to be made to the Deputy Minister on 
,or before the first day of September preceding the session to which admission 
is desired. The fee for the session is ten dollars ($10.00) and is to be paid 
when application for admission is made. 

68. — (1) The Principal of the Normal School shall be responsible for the 
discipline and management of the teachers-in-training. He shall prescribe 
the duties of the staff, subject to the approval of the Minister of Education. 
The staff shall carry out the instruction of the Principal with regard to dis- 
cipline, management, methods of study and all matters affecting the effi- 
ciency of the Normal School and the progress of the teachers-in-training. 

(2) Teachers-in-training shall attend regularly and punctually through- 
out the session and shall submit to such discipline and direction as may be 
prescribed by the Principal. They shall lodge and board at such houses only 
as are provided by the Principal. Ladies and gentlemen shall not board at 
the same house. 

69. The course of study shall consist of the following subjects: — 

I. The Science of Education : 

1. Psychology; 

2. Kindergarten Principles; 

3. Child Study; 

II. History of Education. 

I 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. • 103 






III. School Management. 

IY. A. English: 

1. Language and Composition; 

2. Grammar; 

3. Literature; 

4. Spelling. 

B. Mathematics : 

1. Arithmetic; 

2. Algebra; 

3. Geometry. 

C. Nature Study and Elementary Science: 

1. Elementary study of surroundings; 

2. Biology, Physics, Chemistry, etc.; 

3. Agriculture. 

D. Reading. 

E. Geography. 

F. History. 

G. Physiology and Hygiene. 

H. Manual Training: 

1. Woodwork; 

2. Paper and Cardboard work; 

3. Basketry; 
4.' Weaving; 

5. Metal work; 

6. Modelling; 

7. Glass work. - 

I. Household Science : 

1. Needlework; 

2. Household Economics. 

J. Form Study, Drawing, and Color Work. 

K. Writing. 

L. Music. 

M. Physical Training. 
Y. Practice Teaching in the Model School. 

VI. Such other subjects as may be prescribed by the Minister of 
Education. 

70. For examination purposes the subjects shall be valued as follows : 
Practice Teaching in the Model School, 500 marks; by the Departmental 
Examiners, 300; Psychology, 400; Kindergarten Principles and Child Study, 
50; History of Education, 300; School Management, 300; English, group 
A: Grammar, Literature, Composition and Spelling, 200; groun B: Read- 
ing, History and Geography, 200 ; Mathematics : Arithmetic, Algebra, and 
Geometry, 200; Nature Study and Elementary Science: Biology, Physics, 
etc., 200; Agriculture, Hygiene, Drawing, Writing, Music, Physical Culture! 
Manual Training, Household Economics and Needlework, each 50. 

71. — (1) Teachers-in-training shall take written examinations, to be con- 
ducted by the staff, covering every subject on the course of study. 



104 • THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(2) An examination in practical teaching, to be conducted according to 
the instructions of the Minister of Education, shall be required of every 
teacher-in-training. 

(3) Any candidate who obtains 40 per cent, of the marks in each sub- 
ject of the written examinations and 40 per cent, of the marks in teaching 
(the report of the staff and the report of the special examiners being taken 
jointly) and 60 per cent, of the aggregate marks shall be entitled to pass 
standing. Candidates making 75 per cent, of the aggregate marks shall be 
awarded honors. 

(4) Candidates obtaining from 50 to 59 per cent., inclusive, of the aggre- 
gate marks shall be awarded interim certificates valid for two years. On pres- 
entation of a certificate of successful teaching from an inspector under whose 
jurisdiction they may have taught after leaving a Normal ^School, those 
holding these interim certificates may present themselves for. the final written 
and practical examinations at a Normal School after having taught for at 
least one year. 

(5) Candidates making less than 50 per cent, of the aggregate marks shall 
be required to attend a Normal School another term. 

72. The terms of the Provincial Model Schools shall correspond with 
those of the Public Schools in cities. The hours of study shall be from 9.30 
a.m. to 12 a.m., and from 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m., unless otherwise deter- 
mined by the Principal. The regulations of the Education Department with 
regard to pupils and teachers in Public Schools shall* apply to the teaching 
staff and to pupils of the Model Schools, subject to any modifications that 
may be made from time to time by the Minister of Education. 

73. The Head Master of each Model School and the Director of the 
Provincial Kindergarten shall act under the direction of the Principal of the 
Normal School to which their respective departments are attached, and shall 
be responsible to him for the order, discipline and progress of the pupils, and 
also for the accuracy and usefulness of the lessons conducted by the teachers- 
in-training. 

Ontario Normal College. 

74. The Ontario Normal College shall open each year on the 1st of 
October and close on the 31st of May. Any person who has Senior (Senior 
Leaving) standing or who is a graduate in Arts of any university in the 
British Dominions, and who will be eighteen years of age before the close of 
the College year, may be admitted as a teacher-in-training on application 
to the Minister of Education on or before the 15th of September. Candidates 
for Specialists' certificates must submit evidence as to their non-professional 
Specialist standing 

75. — (1) The Course of Study shall consist of (a) lectures on Psychology, 
the History of Educational systems, the Science of Education, the best 
methods of teaching each subject of the High and Public School courses of 
study, School Management, (b) Practice-teaching, and (c) instruction in 
Reading, School Hygiene, Stenography, Bookkeeping, Typewriting, Art, 
Manual Training, Household Science, Physical Culture, and such other sub- 
jects as may be prescribed by the Minister of Education. 






1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 105 



(2) The marks allowed for examination purposes shall be as follows; 
Psychology and Science of Education, each 200; History of Education, 
School Management, Methods in English and History, in Mathematics, in 
Science, in Classics, and in French and German, each 150. 

(3) The examinations shall also call for a review by the teacher-in- 
training of the High School courses of study and shall be of such a character 
as will test his knowledge of the subjects which a High School teacher is 
legally qualified to teach. 

76. Teachers-in-training shall lodge in such houses only as are approved 
by the Principal; ladies and gentlemen shall not board in the same house 
nor shall they mingle together in the class-rooms or in the halls of the Nor- 
mal College. They shall attend regularly and punctually upon lectures and 
shall submit to the rules of the College with regard to discipline, or any 
other matter required by the Principal, and shall undertake such practice 
teaching as may be prescribed by the Minister of Education. 

77. The Principal shall be responsible for the organization and manage- 
ment of the College and for the discipline of the teachers-in-training. He 
shall prescribe the duties of his staff, and shall from time to time be present 
at their instruction and at the practice teaching of the teachers-in-training. 
He shall keep a record of the sessional examinations on the forms prescribed 
by the Minister of Education and shall make in addition such observations 
with respect to the conduct of each teacher-in-training and his aptitude as a 
teacher as he may deem expedient. 

78. Each lecturer shall explain and illustrate the best methods of deal- 
ing with each branch of his department as it should be taught in the different 
Forms of a High or Public School, and shall, as far as possible, explain and 
justify his methods on scientific principles, giving model lessons for classes 
in different stages of advancement. He shall keep a record of the practice 
teaching of every teacher-in-training, and shall report to the Principal from 
time to time any breach of discipline, any irregularity or any defect of scholar- 
ship on the part of the teacher-in-training, or any other matter which may 
affect the work of the College. 

79.— (1) Teachers-in-training shall take two written examinations during 
the Session, viz., one at the end of the year and the other at the close of the 
session, and such oral examinations as may be considered necessary for testing 
their scholarship iheir knowledge of methods, and their teaching ability. 
These examinations shall be conducted by the staff of the College. 

(2) No teacher-in-training shall be recommended to pass by the examin- 
ers who has m'ade less than 40 per cent, of the marks at the sessional examina- 
tion (fifty marks being the maximum for each) in Eeading, Writing, Manual 
Training (or Household Science), Art, or Physical Culture. Any candidate 
who obtains 40 per cent, of the marks in each subject of the examinations 
(the first and final written examinations being taken jointly), and 60 per cent, 
of the aggregate marks, shall be entitled to pass standing. A candidate who 
fails in the total only, but who makes at least 50 per cent., may be awarded 
an interim Public School teachers' certificate. Candidates for specialist's 
standing must obtain 66 per cent, of the marks assigned to subjects of their 
specialist department. Candidates making seventy-five per cent, of the ag- 
gregate marks shall be awarded honors. 



106 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



80.— (1) Any candidate whose scholarship in the subjects he is legally 
qualified to teach is satisfactory to the staff as tested by written and oral 
examinations and who obtains the required standing in Psychology, the 
Science of Education, the History of Education, School Management, 
Methods in Mathematics, in English and History, in Latin, in Elementary 
Science, and in one of the following groups, viz : (a) Chemistry, Mineralogy, 
Physics, and Biology, (o) French and German, (c) French and Greek (d) Ger- 
man and Greek, shall be entitled to a Normal College Interim certificate. 

(2) The holder of a Specialist's non-professional certificate in any of the 
departments recognized by the Education Department, who passes the final 
examination (including methods in the subjects of his non-professional certi- 
ficate) shall be entitled to a Normal College Interim Specialist's certificate 
in the subjects of his non-professional Specialist's course; but such candidate 
shall be required to show a more extended acquaintance with their special 
department than is required from ordinary candidates. 

(3) All students entering the Normal College, must take the course 
therein prescribed, irrespectively of the academic course which they may have 
taken. 

(4) Unsuccessful candidates at previous examinations will be allowed to 
write at the final examination of any year without attendance at the Normal 
College, and may confine themselves to the same subjects as taken previously. 

(5) Teachers of five years' successful experience, who hold Normal School 
Certificates, and who have the necessary academic standing, may write at the 
final examination of the Normal College without attendance. 

(6) Holders of Normal College Interim Certificates or of High School 
Assistants' Certificates, provided they have the necessary non-professional 
standing, may obtain Specialist's standing on passing the final examination 
of the Normal College in their special department. 

(7) The Principal may make such reasonable modifications of the scheme 
of optional groups (Reg. 80, 1, 'a, b, c, d), as will meet the condition of can- 
didates who have obtained their non-professional standing on courses other 
than those now prescribed by the Regulations. 

The Educational Council. 

81. The Educational Council authorized by the Education Department 
Act, 1901, to conduct Departmental examinations, shall hold its first meet- 
ing each year as may be fixed by the Minister of Education and shall organize 
by electing as chairman one of its members. Subsequent meetings of the 
Council shall be held from time to time as may be determined by the Council. 

82. The Council shall appoint examiners of well known ability as 
teachers in either a University or a High School, to prepare examination 
papers for the (a) Junior and Senior Teachers' and Matriculation examina- 
tions, and (b) such other examinations as may be transferred to the Council 
with the approval of the Education Department. The Council shall also 
appoint examiners of well known experience as Inspectors or Teachers 
(from lists to be submitted by the Minister of Education), to prepare exami- 
nation papers at all other departmental examinations. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 107 



83. For the purpose of reading the answer papers of candidates at the 
Examinations of (a) aforesaid, the Council shall appoint, as associate ex- 
aminers, graduates of any of the Universities in the British Dominions, or 
specialists according to the regulations of the Education Department, who 
are actually engaged in teaching, and who have had not less than two 
years' experience. For the purpose of reading the answer papers of candi- 
dates at other examinations, the Council shall appoint as associate exami- 
ners persons in actual service holding at least First Class certificates. The 
lists from which such selection is made shall be furnished by the Minister 
of Education and shall in each case contain the names of twice the number 
of associate examiners to be appointed. The number of examiners appoint- 
ed by the Council for each examination shall be subject to the instructions 
of the Minister of Education from time to time. 

84. All communications or references requiring the attention of the 
Council shall be addressed to the Education Department. The Registrar 
of the Council shall submit for consideration all matters referred by the 
Minister of Education. The Council shall report promptly to the ^Minister of 
Education all matters that require any action by the Education Department 
or any of its officers. The Council shall appoint an executive committee, of 
cot more than three members. The Education Department shall appoint 
a Chairman of the Board of Examiners who shall exercise such supervision 
over the examinations as the Council may order. Candidates may have 
their papers re-examined on placing an appeal to that effect in the hands 
of the Minister of Education within fifteen days after the issue of the re- 
sults of the examinations. 

Teachers' Certificates. 

85. (1) The Minister of Education may issue certificates on the report 
of the Educational Council or the Education Department, as follows, viz., 
permanent Third Class or District Certificates to teachers of ten years' suc- 
cessful experience. (2) Any person who attends a Public Kindergarten for 
one year and passes the prescribed examination shall be entitled to an As- 
sistant's certificate ; any person who has obtained an Assistant's certificate 
and who has attended a Provincial Kindergarten one year and passes the 
prescribed examinations shall be entitled to a Second Class Public School 
Any person who attends a Normal School one session and who passes the 
prescribed examinations shall be entitled to a Director's certificate. (3) 
certificate, permanent or interim, according to the percentage of marks ob- 
tained and previous experience. An Interim Second Class Certificate may 
be extended from year to year on the report of a Public School Inspector. 
(4) Any person who has passed the prescribed examinations of the Normal 
College shall be entitled to a Normal College Interim Certificate. 

86. A Normal College Interim certificate shall entitle the holder, if 
under 21 years of age, to teach in a Public School only;, and, if over 21 
years, to teach in a Public or High School. After two years' successful ex- 
perience as a teacher, the holder of such certificate shall, on the report of 
the Inspector concerned, be entitled to a permanent certificate as a First 
Class Public School teacher or as a High School assistant, ordinary or 
specialist, according to the class of school in which the experience was ac- 
quired. Normal College Interim certificates may be extended from year 
to year on the report of a Public or a High School Inspector. Any grad- 
uate in Arts in any University in' the British Dominions, who holds a High 
School Assistant's certificate, and who, as shown by the report of the High 



108 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



School Inspector, has taught successfully three years (two of which at 
least were spent in a High School), shall be entitled to a certificate as Prin- 
cipal of a High School or Collegiate Institute. 

87. A third class certificate shall be valid for a period of three years 
from the date thereof ; and may on expiration be renewed by any Board of 
Examiners for a period not exceeding three years in all on the following 
conditions, viz. : — (a) where the applicant has re-passed the Part II. 
Junior Teachers' examination or holds a non-professional certificate of a 
higher grade, (6) Where the applicant has re-passed the County Model 
School examinations. The certificate of any teacher who has not taught 
the full period of three years for which his certificate was granted may be 
renewed by the County Board for any time lost by sickness or any other 
cause. In all cases the report of the Inspector with respect to the efficiency 

)f the applicant as a teacher must be satisfactory. All renewals shall b> 
issued with the authority of the Board, and shall be limited to the jurisdic- 
tion of the Board of Examiners granting the same. 

88. With the consent of the Minister of Education, a temporary cer- 
tificate may be given by the Inspector to any person of suitable character 
and attainments where a qualified teacher is not available, such certificate 
to be valid only under the Board of Trustees applying for the same. 

Public School Inspectors and Duties of Inspectors. 

89. The holder of a degree in Pedagogy who has had four years' ex- 
perience as a teacher of which two years shall have been in a Public 
School, and any person with five years' successful experience as a teacher 
of which at least three years shall have been in a Public School, who holds 
either Specialist's non-professional standing obtained On the University ex- 
amination, or a Degree in Arts from any University in Ontario with first- 
class graduation honors in one or more of the recognized departments in 
such University, and who has passed the examination of the Ontario Nor- 
mal College for a Specialist's certificate, shall be entitled to a certificate as 
an Inspector of Public Schools. 

90. Every inspector of any class of schools conducted under the 
Education Department, while officially visiting a school, shall have su- 
preme authority in the school, and may direct teachers and pupils in regard 
to any or all of the exercises of the school-room. He shall, by personal 
examination or otherwise as he may be directed by the Minister of Educa- 
tion, ascertain the character of the teaching in the schools which he is au- 
thorized to visit ; and shall make enquiry and examination, in such man- 
ner as he may think proper, into the efficiency of the staff, the accommoda- 
tions and equipment of the school, and all matters affecting the health and 
comfort of the pupils. He shall report to the Minister of Education any 
violation of the Schools Act or the Regulations of the Education Depart- 
ment in reference to the class of schools for which he is inspector. 

Teachers' Institutes. 

91. Every Teachers' Institute shall have one meeting each year on a 
Friday and Saturday to be named by the Management Committee. The 
County Council may allow Thursday to be taken also if considered exped- 
ient. The Institute shall hold two sittings per day, of three hours each, 
for at least two days, and one evening sitting. All questions and discus- 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 109 



sions foreign to the teachers' work shall be avoided. The officers of the 
Institute shall be a President, Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer. 
There shall be a Management Committee of five persons, to be appointed by 
the members of the Institute. The officers and the Management Commit- 
tee shall be elected annually. 

92. The Inspector shall furnish the Secretary of the Institute with a 
list of the teachers in his County or inspectoral division. Every Public 
School teacher shall attend continuously all the sessions of the Institute 
of his County or inspectoral division and shall answer to the calling of the 
roll at the opening and closing of each session. A report of the sessions 
attended by each teacher shall be sent by the Secretary to the Board of 
Trustees employing such teacher. 

Reading Course. 

93. The Minister of Education may prescribe a Course of Heading for 
the teachers of Public Schools. The Course shall extend over three years, 
and certificates for reading more than three books in one year shall not be 
granted by the Inspector. For the purposes of the Course, the year shall 
not be granted by the Inspector. For the purposes of the Course, the year 
shall correspond with the calendar year. A teacher may enter on the 
Course by taking any of the books prescribed for the year. The list of 
books for each year will be announced by the Education Department. 

94. Any teacher who desires a certificate of having taken the Public 
School Teachers' Heading Course shall make a synopsis of not less than 
ten or more than fifteen pages of each book read, and shall transmit the 
same to the Inspector of his district on or before the 30th June in each 
year. Such synopsis shall be accompanied by a fee of twenty-five cents 
and a declaration that the books prescribed for the year were read and 
that the synopsis submitted was prepared without assistance by the person 
signing the same. 

95. The Management Committee of each Teachers' Institute shall ap- 
point two persons, who with the Inspector shall form a Committee for de- 
termining whether the synopsis made by the teacher desiring a certificate 
indicates that the books have been read intelligently. The Inspector shall 
issue a certificate for each book so read, on the form prescribed by the Min- 
ister of Education to every teacher whose synopsis has been found satisfac- 
tory. If a teacher is unable to read all the books prescribed for the year, 
or if the synopsis of any book has been rejected, he may substitute the 
books of the next year for those omitted or rejected. 

96. Any teacher who submits to the Education Department certificates 
showing that he has satisfactorily read nine of the books prescribed, shall 
be entitled to receive from the Minister of Education a Diploma certify- 
ing to the completion of one full reading course covering three years. 
Additional Diplomas shall be awarded to teachers who complete additional 
courses of three years. 

Keligious Instruction. 

97. Every Public and High School shall be opened with the Lord's 
Prayer and closed with the reading of the Scriptures and the ' Lord's 
Prayer, or the prayer authorized by the Department of Education. When 
a teacher claims to have conscientious scruples in regard to opening or clos- 
ing the school as herein prescribed, he shall notify the Trustees to that 



110 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



effect in writing ; and it shall be the duty of the Trustees to make such 
provision in the premises as they may deem expedient. 

98. The Scriptures shall be read daily and systematically ; the por- 
tions used may be taken from the book of selections adopted by the Depart- 
ment for that purpose, or from the Bible, as the Trustees by resolution may 
direct. Trustees may also order the reading of the Bible or the authorized 
Scripture Selections by both pupils and teachers at the opening and clos- 
ing of the school, arid repeating of the Ten Commandments at least once a 
week. 

99. No pupil shall be required to take part in any religious exercises 
objected to by his parents or guardians, and in order to the observance of 
this regulation, the teacher, before commencing a religious exercise, is to 
allow a short interval to lapse, during which the children of Roman Catho- 
lics, and of others who have signified their objection, may retire. If in 
virture of the right to be absent from the religious exercises, any pupil 
does not enter the school room till the close of the time allowed for reli- 
gious instruction, such absence .shall not be treated as an offence against 
the rules of the school. 

100. The clergy of any denomination, or their authorized represent- 
atives, .shall have the right to give religious instruction to the pupils of 
their own church, in each school house, at least once a week, after the hour 
of closing the school in the afternoon ; and if the clergy of more than one 
denomination apply to give religious instruction in the same school house, 
the Board of Trustees shall decide on what day of the week the school 
house shall be at the disposal of the clergymen of each denomination, at the 
time above stated. But it shall be lawful for the Board of Trustees to al- 
low clergymen of any denomination, or his authorized representative, to 
give religious instruction to the pupils of his own church providing it be 
not during the regular hours of the school. Emblems of a denominational 
character shall not be exhibited in a Public School during regular school 
hours. 

Grants to Weak Schools. 

101. Where on the report of the Inspector or on other satisfactory 
evidence it appears that any school section is so limited in area, or is so 
remote from market or railway accommodation, or has suffered from any 
exceptional cause as to clearly establish the inability of the ratepayers to 
bear the ordinary burdens of taxation for school purposes, the Minister of 
Education may appropriate to such section out of the grant to Poor Schools 
such sum of money from year to year as he may deem expedient, but noth- 
ing in the regulations shall be construed as establishing the claim of any 
school upon the poor school fund, beyond the discretion of the Education 
Department. 

102. The Inspector shall submit to the County Council at the regular 
meeting thereof in January or June of each year, a list of the schools in 
his Inspectoral Division where the assessment for school purposes is insu- 
fficient for the proper maintenance of the school, and shall indicate in each 
case any special reason why the statutory grants for school purposes should 
be supplemented by the County Council. 

103.' All schools receiving special grants, either from Township or 
County Council, shall receive from the Poor School Fund voted by the Le- 
gislature the equivalent of such special grant, provided the sum voted by 
the Legislature is sufficient. When the Legislative grant is not sufficient 



1904 "EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. Ill 



to admit of paying the equivalent of the County or Township grant, then 
such grant shall be made, as nearly as possible pro rata. Any portion of the 
Poor School Fund remaining after such payments are made may be distri- 
buted among other weak schools on the report of the Inspector. In making 
application for grants special attention should be paid to the following re- 
quirements : — - 

(1) That a School Section with definite boundaries has been set apart 
by the Township Council, having jurisdiction, or, where no municipal or- 
ganization exists, by the Public School Inspector, if any, under the au- 
thority of the twenty-fifth section of the Revised Public Schools Act, 1901. 

(2) That Trustees have been duly elected for such section. 

(3) That a building and other suitable accommodation for the school 
have been provided by the Trustees. 

(4) That a teacher holding a valid certificate has been employed by the 
Trustees for at least six months of the year. 

(5) That the yearly report in the prescribed form has been sent in to 
the Inspector, at the time specified, and certified by him as satisfactory. 

(6) That the assessed value of the section and the financial condition 
of the ratepayers are such as to render aid absolutely necessary, 

Superannuated Teachers. 

104. Any subscriber to the fund for superannuated teachers who fails 
or neglects to pay the annual subscription of $4 on or before the 31st of 
December in any year, shall be required to pay for such year the sum of 
$5. In the case of persons under sixty years of age who have been placed 
upon the superannuated list, proof of disability for professional service 
shall be furnished annually to the Department. Should it appear that any 
superannuated teacher under sixty years of age is capable of resuming his 
profession, the allowance shall in the meantime be withdrawn. No allow- 
ance shall be paid unless satisfactory evidence of good moral character is 
furnished the Education Department annually, or when required. 

Text Books. 

105. (1) The copyright of every authorized text book shall, where pos- 
sible be vested in the Education Department. The publisher of an author- 
ized text book shall submit to the Minister of Education a sample copy of 
every edition for approval, and no edition of any text book shall be consid- 
ered as approved unless a certificate to that effect, in writing, has been is- 
sued by the Minister of Education. 

(2) Before application is made for the authorization of any text book, 
the book must have been in circulation for at least six months for examina- 
tion by teachers, inspectors, and other educationists, provided that this 
Regulation shall not apply to any book the authorization of which is under 
consideration at the date of these regulations. 

(3) Subject to the preceding sub-section, the Minister of Education, 
when a change in Text Books is deemed desirable, may submit to a Com- 
mittee of Education Council, as hereinafter provided, for examination and 
report any and all books for which such authorization is sought. In the 
case of Text Books to be used in the Public Schools, the hereinbefore men- 
tioned Committee shall consist of not more than five members, one of whom 
shall be the Inspector of Public Schools and one of them the Public School 



112 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



representative on the said Educational Council. In the case of Text Books 
to be used in the High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, the Committees 
shall consist of not more than five members, of which the High School rep- 
resentatives on the said Educational Council, and the President of the Col- 
lege and High School section of the Ontario Educational Association shall 
be members. 

106. Before any authorized text book is placed on the market, the 
publisher thereof shall execute such agreements and give such security for 
the publication of such book as may Be required by the Minister of Educa- 
tion. Any authorized text book shall be subject at every stage of its manu- 
facture to the inspection and approval of the Education Department as re- 
gards printing, binding and paper, and may be removed from the list of 
authorized text books in case the publisher fails to comply with the regula- 
tions of the Education Department. 

107. Every authorized text book shall bear the imprint of the pub- 
lisher, and shall show upon the cover the authorized retail price. No part 
of an authorized text book shall be used for advertising purposes, and no 
change shall be made in the letter press, binding or paper of any authorized 
text book without the consent of the Minister of Education. Books re- 
commended as reference books shall not be used as text books by the pupils, 
and any teacher who permits such books, or any other book not authorized 
as a text book for the Public Schools, to be used as such, and any teacher 
who permits the use of charts as substitutes for any of the authorized text 
books, shall be liable to such penalties as are imposed by the Schools Act. 

Free Text Books. 

108. Any Public or Separate School Board in rural districts may, by 
a resolution, decide to have certain Text Books purchased for the pupils 
free of cost to the parents or guardians. 

109. The Text Books that may be provided in this way shall include 
only such Readers as may be authorized for use in the Public or Separate 
Schools. 

110. Any rural School Board which provides such Text Book free 
for the scholars shall be entitled to a grant, equivalent to one-half the 
amount expended, from whatever money may be appropriated for the pur- 
pose by the Legislature. 

111. Trustees shall have the right to purchase from either wholesale 
or retail dealers, and on such conditions as they may consider most desir- 
able. 

112. The Trustees are required to make proper arrangements for the 
care of the Text Books which become the property of the Board ; and the 
Principal or a Teacher of the school shall be Librarian, and act under 
such instructions as may be given by the Minister of Education, the In- 
spector or the Trustees of the school concerned. 

113. All applications for Legislative aid must be made, through the 
Public (or Separate) School Inspector, to the Minister of Education by the 
Trustees, who shall give all necessary information regarding the books 
purchased together with such vouchers from the Booksellers as may be re- 
quired. The Inspector will make application to the Education Department 
on a form to be provided. 

114. All applications by trustees for Legislative aid must be made 
before the first day of October in each year, and after the books have been, 
received. Any purchases made after that date and before the same date of 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 113 



the succeeding year may be included in applications made the following 
year. 

Public School Libraries. 

115. The Minister of Education may prepare a catalogue of books 
adapted for school libraries, or approve of a catalogue recommended by 
the Inspector for his inspectorate, the lists to include mainly works suit- 
able for children, in such departments as biography, history, geography, 
travel, mythology and fables, elementary science, citizenship, etc. 

116. Any rural school board which provides a library for the scholars 
shall be entitled to a share of whatever money may be appropriated for the 
purpose by the Legislature, if it purchases such books as are contained in 
the approved lists. 

117. Every rural school board which establishes a library under 
these conditions shall be entitled to a grant, equivalent to half the amount 
expended, but not to exceed $10, in any one year, and provided the appro- 
priation made by the Legislature will warrant such payment. 

118. Should the appropriation made by the Legislature not be suffi- 
cient in any year to meet the demand arising from the establishment of 
rural school libraries, or additions thereto, whatever sum is granted for 
the purpose by the Legislature will be paid pro rata. 

119. The powers heretofore held by trustees to establish school li- 
braries are not affected by these provisions ; and Boards have full author- 
ity under the provisions of the statute to purchase books for the school li- 
brary, and to make such selections as they may deem expedient. Any aid 
granted from the Legislative appropriation will, however, be based solely 
upon the amount expended for books given in the catalogues prepared or 
approved by the Minister of Education. 

120. The trustees are required to make proper arrangements for the 
care of the library ; and the principal of the school shall be librarian and 
act under such instructions as may be given by the Minister of Education, 
the Inspector, or the trustees of the school concerned. 

121. All applications for legislative aid must be made, through the 
Public School Inspector to the Minister of Education, by the trustees, who 
shall give all necessary information regarding the books purchased, to- 
gether with such vouchers from the booksellers as may be required. The 
Inspector shall make application to the Education Department on a form 
to be provided. 

122. All applications by trustees for legislative aid must be made 
before the first day of July in each year and after the books have been re- 
ceived. Any purchases made after that date may be included in applica- 
tions made the following year. 

Eural School Gardens. 

123. For the purpose of encouraging agriculture and horticulture, 
and also for the purpose of increasing the attractiveness of rural schools, 
the Minister of Education may issue instructions for the guidance of trus- 
tees, teachers, and inspectors. 

124. Any rural School Board which provides a school garden with 
the necessary equipment and accommodation shall be entitled to a share 
of whatever money may be appropriated for the purpose by the Legisla- 
ture. 

125. Every rural School Board which provides a school garden shall 
be entitled to an initial grant not exceeding one hundred dollars, and i 



114 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



subsequent annual grant of ten dollars, provided the appropriation made 
by the Legislature will warrant such payment. 

126. Should the appropriation made by the Legislature not be suffi- 
cient in any year to meet the demands arising from the establishment of 
school gardens, whatever sum is granted for the purpose by the Legislature 
will be paid pro rata. 

127. The area of the school garden must be at least one acre, in ad- 
dition to that of the regular .school ground, to which it must be adjacent 
or from which it must be removed only a short distance. 

128. The trustees must provide necessary tools and implements, such 
as rakes, hoes, lines, pruning knives, etc. 

129. A suitable shed must be erected for use as a working laboratory 
and for storage of tools, seeds, etc. 

130. Such instructions will be given by the Public School Inspector 
to the trustees and teacher as will meet the special character of the local- 
ity and promote, so far as possible, a practical education. 

131. The grant will be payable on the report of the Inspector, who 
will certify that the School Board has complied with the prescribed condi- 
tions. 

Household Science. 

132. Subject to the provisions hereinafter mentioned, no certificate 
to teach Household Science shall be awarded after September 1st, 1904, to 
anyone who does not hold at least Junior Leaving or Junior Matriculation 
standing. 

133. All institutions whose graduates may be recognized as teachers 
of Household Science shall provide, to the satisfaction of the Education 
Department, suitable courses of study as well as adequate accommodation, 
equipment and instruction, for students preparing to become teachers in 
.this department. 

134. Every student who desides to bec.ome a teacher of Household 
Science must take a two years' course of study in the department, but any 
person holding a certificate from one of the Normal Schools who com- 
pletes satisfactorily a one year's course shall be awarded a teacher's cer- 
tificate in Household Science. 

135. Any graduate of the Normal College who completes satisfac-. 
torily a one year's course at one of the recognized institutions for the train- 
ing of teachers in Household Science, shall be awarded a teacher's certi- 
ficate as a Sepcialist in this department. 

136. Any person holding a certificate to teach Household Science 
granted by the Education Department shall be qualified to have charge of 
a department of Household Science under any High, Public or Separate 
School Board. 

137. Certificates as teachers of Household Science shall give no legal 
qualification to teach any of the other subjects of the school curriculum. 

138. No grant shall be paid by the Government towards a depart- 
ment of Household Science unless the teacher who has charge of such de- 
partment is duly qualified as herein provided. 

139. These provisions shall not apply in the case of teachers already 
in charge of the department of Household Science or to students preparing 
to be teachers of the subject who have been enrolled before the date of these 
regulations. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 11.5 



Manual Training. 

140. Subject to the conditions herein mentioned, the Macdonald 
Institute, Guelph, shall be the only institution recognized by the Educa- 
tion Department for the training of teachers in Manual Training. 

141. The Macdonald Institute shall, provide, to the satisfaction of 
the Education Department, suitable courses of study as well as adequate 
accommodation, equipment and instruction for students desiring to become 
teachers of Manual Training. 

142. Any person holding at least a second class certificate from one 
of the Normal Schools, who completes satisfactorily a one year's course at 
the Macdonald Institute, shall be awarded a teacher's certificate in Manual 
Training. 

143. Any graduate of the Normal College, who completes satisfac- 
torily a one year's course at the Macdonald Institute, shall be awarded a 
teacher's certificate as a Specialist in Manual Training. 

144. Any person holding a certificate from the Macdonald Institute 
as a Teacher of Manual Training, shall be qualified to have charge of a 
department of Manual Training under any High, Public or Separate 
School Board. 

145. No grant shall be paid by the Government towards a depart- 
ment of Manual Training unless the teacher who has charge of such 
department is duly qualified as herein provided. 

146. A certificate as a Teacher of Manual Training or as a Specialist 
in the same department shall give no qualification to teach any of the other 
subjects of the Public or High School curriculum. 

147. These provisions shall not affect any person who is now in 
charge of a department of Manual Training in any High, Public or Separ- 
ate School, or who may be appointed by the Board concerned before the 
1st of September, 1904 ; it being understood, that such persons shall have 
qualifications satisfactory to the Minister of Education. 

General Directions to Trustees. 

148. The notice calling an annual or special meeting should be sign- 
ed by the Secretary or by a majority of the trustees. Any ratepayer may 
call the meeting to order and nominate a chairman as soon as the hour ap- 
pointed arrives. The business of all school meetings should be conducted 
according to the following rules of order : — 

(1) Addressing Chairman. — Every elector shall rise previously to 
speaking, and address himself to the chairman. 

(2) Order of speaking . — When two or more electors arise at once, the 
chairman shall name the elector who shall speak first, when the other elect- 
or or electors shall next have the right to address the meeting in the order 
named by the chairman. 

(3) Motion to be read. — Any elector may require the question or mo- 
tion under discussion to be read for his information at any time, but not 
bo as to interrupt an elector who may be speaking. 

(4) Speaking twice. — No elector 'shall speak more than twice on the 
same question or amendment without leave of the meeting, except in ex- 
planation of something which may have been misunderstood, or until every 
one choosing to speak shall have spoken. 

(5) Protest. — No protest against an election, or other proceedings of 
the school meeting, shall be received by the chairman. All protests must 
be sent to the Inspector within twenty days at least after the meeting. 

11 E. 



116 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(6) Adjournment. — A motion to adjourn a school meeting shall al- 
ways be in order, provided that no second motion to the same effect shall 
be made until after some intermediate proceedings shall have been had. 

(7) Motion to be in writing and seconded. — A motion cannot be put 
from the chair, or debated, unless the same be seconded. If required by 
the chairman, all motions must be reduced to writing. 

(8) Withdrawal of a motion. — After a motion has been announced or 
read by the chairman, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the meeting; 
but may be withdrawn at any time before decision, by the consent of the 
meeting. 

(9) Kind of motions to be received. — When a motion is under debate 
no other motion shall be received, unless to amend it, or to postpone it, or 
for adjournment. 

(10) Order of putting motion. — All questions shall be put in the re- 
verse order in which they are moved. Amendments shall be put before 
the main motion ; the last amendment first, and so on. 

(11) Reconsidering motion. — A motion to reconsider a vote may be 
made by any elector at the same meeting ; but no vote of reconsideration 
shall be taken more than once on the same question at the same meeting. 

(12) Minutes — At the close of every annual or special meeting the 
chairman should sign the minutes, and send forthwith to the Inspector a 
copy of the same signed by himself and the Secretary. 

(13) Legal Trustee. — Every Trustee declared elected by the Chair- 
man of the school meeting is a legal Trustee until his election is set aside 
by proper authority. 

(14) Use of Seal. — The seal of the school corporation should not be 
affixed to letters or notices, but only to contracts, agreements, deeds, or 
other papers, which are designed to bind the Trustees as a corporation for 
the payment of money, or the performance of any specified act, duty or 
thing. 

* Accommodations of High Schools: Grading and Grants. 

149. School accommodation shall be considered as divided into four 
grades, according to the character and extent of the premises, school 
buildings and their equipment.* Where, in Schools already erected, any 
part of the accommodation is used jointly by the High and Public Schools, 
the grading shall be one degree lower than if the Schools were separate. 
In determining the grades, the officers of the Education Department shall 
have regard to the following considerations : — 

(1) School Grounds.— The school grounds shall be not less than one 
acre in extent, easily accessible, not exposed to disturbing noises, and 
exclusively devoted to High School purposes. The grounds shall be prop- 
erlv levelled and drained, and ornamented with trees, shrubs, and flower 
beds ; they shall also have separate entrances, recreation grounds, and 
walks for the sexes. The recreation grounds for the sexes shall be sep- 
arated with a close board fence, wall, or hedge. Provision shall be made 
for keeping the premises and grounds in good order. 

(2) Water Supply. — Where there is no other source of water supply 
there shall be a well in the school premises properly protected against 
pollution. Lavatories, water-taps or tanks, and drinking cups shall be 

*For suggestions in regard to accommodations, sanitation and school room decoration, see 
section XIV of the Catalogue of Books recommended by the Education Department for High 
School Reference Libraries, (1902). 



1904 Education department. 117 



provided. Grades I and II shall be given only when the water supply is 
inside the building. 

(3) Closets. — The closets for the sexes shall be under separate roofs 
several feet apart, and properly screened from observation. Each closet 
shall contain a sufficient number of compartments for the attendance, each 
compartment being provided with a door. The boys' closet shall be built 
of glazed brick or similar material ; or of wood, painted a dark color and 
sanded. Urinals, of slate or similar material, divided into compartments 
and properly situated, shall be provided for the boys, and separate and 
locked closets for the teachers. The closets and urinals shall be cleansed 
and disinfected at suitable intervals. Covered walks shall be laid from 
the door of the school building to the closets. A close, high board fence 
or wall shall be provided between the boys' and girls' side, from the closet 
to the school building, and the entrance of the closets shall be 
properly screened. In the case of Union Schools, the closets for High 
School pupils shall be separate from the closets for Public School punils. 
Where the closets are inside the building the above conditions shall apply 
mutatis mutandis. 

(4) School Building. — The grading of the school building shall de- 
pend upon the site and architectural appearance. In every school building 
there shall be separate entrances for the sexes with vestibules or covered 
porches, and separate means of egress at the rear to the recreation grounds 
and closets. The High School building shall be separate from the Public 
School building, and at least thirty feet distant from the highway. A 
school-bell and a flag and flag-pole should be provided. 

(5) Class Rooms. — The class-rooms shall be conveniently arranged, 
well proportioned and oblong in shape. Suitable color-schemes should be 
adopted for the halls and class-rooms (see Books of Reference, note, p. 43.) 
The floors should be kept in good order. A superficial area of 12 square 
feet and a cubic air space of 250 feet shall be allowed for each pupil. In 
three-masters' schools or over, at least one separate class-room shall be pro- 
vided for science teaching ; in two-masters' schools one of the ordinary 
class-rooms may be used for this purpose, and in the larger schools the la- 
boratories for Chemistry, Physics, and Biology shall be separate. There 
shall be a hall or class-room in which all the pupils can assemble. A 
movable fanlight shall be placed over each class-room door. The class- 
rooms should be decorated with good pictures, casts, and vases, and other 
beautiful ornaments. (See Books of Reference, note p. 43.) 

(6) Teachers' Private Rooms. — There shall be at least one room for 
the private use of the teaching staff, of suitable size and comfortably fur- 
nished. Where the teaching staff is large, there shall be two or more 
private rooms, one of which shall be assigned for the accommodation of the 
female teachers. 

(7) Halls. — The halls shall be of suitable size, well lighted, and shall 
be so placed to admit of separate entrances for the sexes to the waiting- 
rooms, cap rooms, and class-rooms. In buildings of two or more stories 
there shall be separate stairways for the sexes, easy of access and well 
guarded. Suitable color schemes and decorations should be provided. 

(8) Waiting-Rooms and. Cap Rooms. — The waiting-rooms and cap 
rooms for the sexes shall be conveniently situated with respect to the class- 
rooms. The waiting-rooms shall be furnished with benches and tables, and 
the cap rooms, with all necessary appliances for storing umbrellas and for 
hanging caps or cloaks. Provision shall also be made in the building for 
storing bicycles. 



118 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(9) Desks. — There shall be a single desk for each pupil in attendance. 
The desks shall be of suitable size with movable seats and adjustable 
lids. There shall be a desk and a chair in each class-room for the use of 
the teacher, and at least one chair for a visitor. The laboratory shall be 
supplied with suitable tables for experimental work in both Physics and 
Chemistry. In the larger schools special provision shall be made for 
teaching Biology and Physics ; special desks shall also be provided for 
Commercial work. Single desks shall be graded I and double desks II, if 
there is suitable provision in each case for practical work in Science ; other- 
wise the grading shall be one degree lower. 

(10) Blackboards. — The blackboards shall be of sufficient extent and 
of good quality (slate preferred), properly placed in regard to light and 
distance from the floor, and furnished with troughs to hold chalk dust. 
There shall be a suitable supply of erasers for teachers and pupils, and the 
troughs and erasers shall be cleaned every day. 

(11) Lighting. — The class-rooms shall be lighted from the left of the 
pupils, the lower edges of the windows being on a level with the heads of 
the pupils. The windows of every school building shall be adjusted by 
weights and pulleys. The windows shall admit of an adequate diffusion 
of light throughout the whole class-room. Grade I is given only when 
the lighting is from the left. 

(12) Heating. — The temperature of the class-room, halls, waiting-rooms, 
cap-rooms and teachers' private rooms shall be not less than sixty-eight 
degrees. Where stoves are used they shall be so placed and protected as 
to prevent discomfort to any pupil. Grades I and II shall be given only 
in the case of schools heated with hot air, steam pipes, or hot-water pipes. 

(13) Ventilation. — Due regard shall be paid to the moisture as well as 
the temperature of the atmosphere, and provision shall be made for a com- 
plete change of air at least three times every hour. A draft-chamber or 
other suitable special means of ventilation shall be provided for the labora- 
tory. 

(14) Gymnasium. — The Gymnasium should either be a part of the 
main school building or be connected therewith by a covered walk. It 
shall be adequately heated and ventilated. The sizes best adapted, hav- 
ing regard to the number of pupils, are 80x40, or 70x35. The windows in 
the sides of the building should be at least twelve feet from the ground,; 
each window should be about three feet high by six feet long. 
They should be sufficiently numerous to furnish adequate light and 
easily adjustable for the purposes of ventilation. One end of the Gym- 
nasium should be a dead wall without windows ; the other end should con- 
tain, the doors for entrance and either one large window or several small 
ones. The floor should be planked and a suitable supply of mattresses 
provided. The trapeze and flying rings should be in the central portion; 
suspended from points at least sixteen feet from the ground. The side 
rings should be suspended from points thirteen to sixteen feet from the 
ground. The stationary gymnastic appartus, and the stove, where one is 
used for heating and where one is sufficient, should be placed at the end of 
the building containing the doors and windows. A locker and racks and 
stands should be provided for the movable appliances when not used by the 
class. Private rooms should be provided where the pupils may make any 
desirable change in their dress; and also an adequate number of baths. 
A. running track should also be provided. Where the organization renders 
it necessary, separate gymnasia should be provided for the sexes. If suit- 
ably planned, the assembly-room may be used in addition for Physical 
Culture. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



119 



15. The Grant on the grading of the school premises shall be distributed 
according to the following scheme : 






8 

5 


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ft 

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Two Masters' High Schools— 

Grade T 


$ c. 

6 00 
4 50 
3 00 
1 50 


$c 

3 00 
2 50 
2 00 
1 00 


$ c. 

15 00 
12 50 
7 50 
3 75 


$c. 

6 00 
4 50 
3 vO 
1 50 


$c. 

24 00 
20 00 
16 00 
12 00 


$ c. 

3 00 
2 50 
2 00 
1 50 


3 00 
2 50 
2 00 
1 50 


1 c. 

3 00 

2 50 
2 00 
1 50 


3 c. 

3 00 
2 50 
2 00 
1 5t 


$0. 

9 00 
7 50 
6 00 
4 50 


f e. 

3 00 
2 50 
2 00 
1 50 


$c. 

6 00 
4 50 
3 00 
1 50 


6 00 
4 50 
3 00 
1 50 


$c. 

10 00 


II 

Ill 


7 50 
5 00 


IV 


2 50 


Three or more Masters' High 
Schools— 

Grade I 


9 00 
6 75 
4 50 
2 25 


4 50 

3 25 
2 00 

1 00 

6 00 

4 00 

2 00 

1 00 


22 50 
18 25 
11 25 
5 65 


9 00 
6 75 
4 50 

2 25 

12 00 
9 00 
6 00 

3 00 


38 00 
30 00 
24 00 
18 00 

48 00 
40 00 
32 00 
24 00 


4 50 
3 75 

3 00 

2 25 

6 00 

5 00 

4 00 

3 00 


4 50 

3 75 

3 00 

2 25 

6 00 

5 00 

4 00 

3 00 


4 50 
3 75 
3 00 
2 25 


4 50 
3 75 
3 00 
2 25 


13 50 
11 25 
9 00 
6 75 


4 50 

3 75 

3 00 

2 25 

6 00 

5 00 

4 00 

3 00 


9 00 
6 75 
4 50 

2 15 

12 00 
9 00 
6 00 

3 03 


9 00 
6 74 
4 50 
2 25 

12 00 
9 60 
6 00 


15 00 


II 


11 25 


Ill 

IV 


7 50 
3 75 






Collegiate Institutes— 

Grade I 


12 00 
9 00 
6 00 
3 00 


30 00 

25 00 

15 00 

7 50 


6 00 
5 00 
4 00 
3 00 


6 00 
5 00 
4 00 
3 00 


18 00 
15 00 
12 00 
9 00 


20 00 


II 


15 00 


Ill 


10 00 


IV 


3 06 5 00 













Gymrikisium. — There shall be four grades for High Schools and Colleg- 
iate Institutes respectively, according to the suitability of the character and 
extent of the accommodations : — 

For Grade I., ten per cent, of the value of the gymnasium as reported by 
the High School Inspector, will be allowed up to the maximum; for Grade 
II., ten per cent, of three-fourths of such value; for Grade III., ten per cent, 
of half of such value; and for Grade IV. ten per cent, of one-fourth of such 
value; but, when suitable additional accommodation is in use for Physical 
Culture, the grading will be one degree higher. 



Technical Instruction: Distribution of Grants. 



150. — (1) The plans of every building hereafter erected or of any room 
adapted for the purpose of Manual Training, Household Science, or Special 
Technical Instruction shall be submitted to the Minister of Education, and 
be subject to his approval, and a copy of such plans shall be filed in the De- 
partment of Education. 

(2) Subject to the provisions of sections (5), (7) and (8) hereof, every 
school maintaining a Manual Training department shall be entitled to the 
following annual grants : — 

(a) A fixed grant of f 350. 00. 

(6) 10 per cent, of the expenditure over |600.00 for teacher's salary or 
salaries, but so as not in any case to exceed $100.00. 

(c) 20 per cent, of the cost of equipment for each of the first five years, 
and thereafter of the annual renewals and additions. 



120 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(3) Subject to the provisions of sections (5), (7) and (8) hereof, every 
school maintaining a department for Household Science shall receive an- 
nually : — 

(a) A fixed grant of $200.00. 

(b) 20 per cent, of the expenditure over $500.00 for teachers' salaries, 
but so as not to exceed $50.00. 

(c) 20 per cent, of cost of equipment for each of the first five years, 
and thereafter of annual additions and renewals. 

(4) Any school under the control of a Public, Separate, or High School 
Board, or Board of Education, or of a recognized Technical School Board, 
which is specially organized and equipped for giving instruction in the 
theory and practice of the mechanical and industrial arts and sciences, shall 
be entitled, to receive out of any Legislative appropriation therefor, in ad- 
dition to such sums as they may be entitled to receive under sections 2 and 3 
hereof, such further sum as the Minister of Education majr approve, based 
upon inspection and report, but so as not in any case to exceed $750.00. To 
be eligible for this grant the building in which instruction is given, equip- 
ment, courses of study, and qualification of staff shall be approved by the 
Minister of Education. 

(5) In apportioning the Legislative grants on equipments, the maximum 
value recognized shall be (a) for Manual Training $500.00, (o) for Household 
Science $300.00. 

(6) The course of study, and the qualifications of every teacher hereafter 
employed, shall be subject to the approval and regulations of the Education 
Department. 

(7) The unit of distribution of the Legislative grant for Manual Training 
and Household* Science shall be the time of one teacher for five hours on each 
of five days per week. 

(8) The grants mentioned in the foregoing sections shall be subject to 
such pro-rata increase or reduction as the Legislative appropriation therefor 
will permit. 

(9) No Manual Training or Household Science school or department will 
be recognized as efficiently equipped that is provided with accommodation for 
less than 12 or more than 25 students, at any one time, for practical work. 



Instructions and Regulations. 

151. Instructions may be issued by the Minister of Education from time 
to time to Inspectors or other officers in carying out the provisions of these 
Regulations. 

152. All former Regulations of the Education Department are hereby 
repealed. 

SCHEDULE I. 

Public School Programme of Studies. 
General. 

Manners and Morals. — Throughout the whole Public School course the 
teacher should incidentally, from current incidents, from lessons in literature, 
history, etc., occasionally by anecdotes and didactic talks, and bv his own 
example as well as by precept, seek to give instruction in moral principles and 
practices and in good manners. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 121 



The following outline is suggested : — 

Duties to oneself: purity, health, nobility, self-control, self-reliance, 
generosity, truthfulness, good taste in dress, cultivation of will power, econ- 
omy, moral value of work, etc. 

Duties in school to teachers and fellow pupils : Obedience, punctuality, 
neatness, order, etc. 

Duties in the home : Respect for parents, consideration for brothers and 
sisters, the weak, the aged, etc. 

Duties to the lower animals : Kindness, etc. 

Duties to the people generally : Honesty, courtesy, charity, toleration, 
justice, etc. 

Duties to our country : Patriotism, courage, honor, obedience to law, 
etc. 

Manners : Proper conduct at home, at school, on the street, and in 
public places, at social gatherings, etc. 

Reading and Literature. — In both Reading and Literature throughout 
the course, the objects are intelligent and intelligible natural reading and 
the creation of a taste for the best kinds of books. But, in the Reading 
class the main object is the former; and, in the Literature class, the latter. 
Silent reading should receive attention as well as oral reading, the results of 
both being tested by questions or by oral or written reproduction. In Litera- 
ture, the books should be chiefly narrative and descriptive, being obtained 
from the School or Public Library or provided by the Board or the pupils 
themselves, as may be determined by the Board. Even when a supply of suit- 
able books is obtainable, the teacher, in the lower classes in particular should 
read to the pupils or give, them in his own words much of the best literature. 
From the first also the pupils should be required to memorize and recite 
choice selections, not merely to cultivate the verbal memory but to learn to 
appreciate beauty of thought and expression and to store the mind with 
literature that will enrich their lives. 

Composition. — Throughout the courses, oral and written composition 
should be correlated with all the other subjects. In the lower forms, the 
material of the Mature-study, in particular, should afford a basis for oral 
language lessons. The stories or myths told or read to the pupils should be 
reproduced by them orally. Pictures may also be used to stimulate their 
imagination and to train them, by conversation, in easy and correct oral ex- 
pression of thought and feeling. The written language lessons involve all 
implied in the oral work, with the addition of training in the mechanism of 
written expression. 

Writing. — Until the proper formation of letters and figures is thorough- 
ly learned, instruction in writing should be correlated with that in Reading 
and t Arithmetic, and thereafter the character of all the written exercises 
should receive close attention, with due emphasis upon the attitude of the 
body and the position of the pen and paper. 

Art. — As means of expression, the Art subjects should be connected 
closely with nature work, constructive work, history, and literature. Many 
pictures should be used in the lower classes, and each subject should be il- 
lustrated with the child's free expression. As in writing, special attention 
should be given to the attitude of the body and the position of the paper and 
the pencil, etc. 

Constructive Work. — The object of constructive work is mental de- 
velopment and physical control. The making ol thing's should be subsidiary 
to the thought . processes involved, and the exercises should sustain the 
child's interest, and take advantage of his natural desire to construct. Con- 
structive work should make the ability to do a part of the knowing, and 



122 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



should incorporate knowledge into habit and theory with practice. The 
amount of work accomplished is unimportant in comparison with the mas- 
tery of correct methods and the formation of good habits. Every opportunity 
should be given the pupils to modify given type models or to design new ones, 
and in the lower grades to rearrange given units or create new combinations. 
All of the work should have in it the elements of beauty in construction, ,in 
proportion, and in decoration. Though we may not be able to add to the 
quantity or the variety of the material, we can modify its form and we can 
arrange it in new combinations. The making of new forms and combinations, 
the giving of definite expression to ideas and mental images, the rendering of 
the inner outer, is the great Froebelian doctrine of creativeness. 

Nature Study. — From the character of the subject the course must be 
more or less elastic, and the topics detailed in the programme are intended to 
be suggestive rather than prescriptive. It may be that, owing to local 
conditions, topics not named are amongst ,the best that can be used, but all 
substitutions and changes shall be made a subject of consultation with the 
Inspector. The treatment of the subject must always be suited to the age 
and experience of the pupils, and to the seasons of the year, accessibiilt^ of 
materials, etc. Notes shall not be dictated by the teacher. Mere information, 
whether from book, written note or even the teacher, is not Nature-study. 
The acquisition of knowledge must be made secondary to awakening and 
maintaining the pupil's interest in nature and to training him to habits of 
observation and investigation. Books for reference and supplementary read- 
ing should, however, be provided in the school library. Some valuable pub- 
lications on the subject of Nature-Study, for the teacher's use, may be obtain- 
ed free on application to the Department of Agriculture, Toronto. 

Physical Culture. — A systematic and well-developed course of physical 
exercises, both free and with apparatus, should be taken up in each of the sub- 
divisions. While dependent to some extent upon the accommodations and 
the equipment, the exercises should always be suitable in character and fre- 
quency to the age and physical condition of individual pupils. The main 
object of the course is the symmetrical development of the body, securing 
at the same time strength and grace, with correct and prompt obedience to 
the will. The unconstrained but suitable position of the pupils in walking 
and in their seats and on the floor should also receive due attention. Pre- 
vailing defects should be studied and exercises given to correct them. School 
games and sports should be systematical^ encouraeed. Free play under 
the direction of the teacher is indispensable, especially in the lower forms. 

Music. — Singing should be taken up in all the forms. The fact that 
it is one means of self-expression should be kept in view, and the songs first 
learned should be those that the pupil can readily anoropriate to himself. 
In the first form, accordingly, the methods and material of the Kindergarten 
should be continued. The course should begin with rote-songs, easy notation 
being introduced towards the close of Form II. and continued throughout 
according to the aee of the oiroil and the oomnetency of the teacher. Form 
III., however, represents the transitional period from the emotional and na- 
tural^ uses of music to its more formal presentation. This stage brings a 
definite change from ear to eye, from rote to sight-singing, to the recognition 
in their printed forms of impressions of pitch and rythm acquired in the earl- 
ier stages. 

Note. — After consultation with the Inspector, suitable books in the different de- 
partments of school work should be selected for the library from the Catalogue of Books 
Recommended for Public School Libraries. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 123 



i Form 1. 

Reading. — Intelligent and intelligible natural reading. First Read- 
ers, Parts I. and II. Phonic Readers. Supplementary reading books 
and selections of corresponding grade. Analysis and synthesis of words by 
sound and by letter. Exercises in breathing, articulation, and vocalization. 

Spelling. — Transcription; dictation and oral spelling of phonic words; 
dictation of selected sentences. Careful attention to spelling in all written 
work. 

Literature. — Myths, fairy stories, and fables; stories and poems il- 
lustrating nature study lessons, and appropriate to the time of the year and 
to the various school holidays; learning and reciting of literary gems. 

Composition. — Oral and written statements in connection with form and 
color study, nature study, etc. ; oral and written reproduction of stories told 
or read; description of actions, events, etc., within the pupil's experience or 
knowledge; transcription from readers with attention to capitals, spelling, 
and punctuation; correction of common errors in conversation. 

Histjory. — Stories of primitive people : Abraham ami Isaac, Jacobl 
and his sons, the bondage in Egypt; the Ancient Britons; the North American 
Indians and Eskimos, their mode of life, their occupations and customs; 
special reference to the Indian tribes inhabiting the school localities. Stories 
relating to our public school-holidays. 

Geography. — Observation of particular forms of land and water, as hills, 
valleys, ravines, streams, ponds, etc., in the neighborhood of the school; 
location of objects observed; general notion of position and direction; ac- 
tivities of home and vicinity, the farm, the shops, the factories, things 
brought to market, food, milk, water supply, shelter and clothing, rail and 
other roads, water-ways; systematic trips to places of geographical interest 
near the school; observation of the progress of the sun from sunrise to sun- 
set; observation of position and appearance of the moon, the "Great Bear"; 
clouds, appearance, motions; rain, snow, hail, etc.; stories of child-life in 
other lands with illustrations. 

Note. — In its early stages geography should be but a phase of the observational 
work in nature study. 

Arithmetic. — Numerical relations based upon grouping and separating 
objects and quantities; measuring in connection with objective work; common 
onits of measurement within the child's experience, as inch, foot, yard, square 
inch, pint, quait, gallon, peek cent, dollar, ounce, pound, day, week, month, 
year, to be learned in practice ; addition and subtraction of small numbers ; 
systematic numbering to 1,000's. Accuracy,- rapidity and neatness of work 
should be kept in view. 

Note. — The need to use numbers will frequently arise in the nature work and 
other exercises of the class room. The required numerical relations should then be 
made definite. In this way, with or without figures, many of the analyses and 
syntheses of the numbers as far as ten will be learned practically. At each stage 
arithmetical problems should be made to grow out of and be connected with the child's 
experience. 

Writing. — Special attention to the proper position at the desk, of body 
and of pen and paper; words and letters as taught in the reading lessons, 
and figures and numbers as taught in the arithmetic lessons, on paper at 
the desk under the direct supervision of the teacher; lightness of stroke and 
freedom of movement, with easy movement exercises from the first, similar 
to the letter and figure forms, at the desk and at the blackboard. 

Art. — Freehand expression with pencil, pen, crayon, and water-color. 

Six standard colors. 



124 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Blackboard and pencil drawing (free movement). — Simple natural ob- 
jects and other -objects in which children are interested, as toys, dolls, etc. 

Water colors or colored crayons. — Simple grasses, leaves, sprays, flowers, 
fruits, birds, pet animals, etc., studied in nature work. 

Color, pencil, or ink illustrations of stories; study of pictures. 

Constructive Work. — Paper cutting and folding in elementary geo- 
metric patterns, coloring and grouping of these as bases of design; this work 
to be connected with drawing and modelling in clay. 

Making of objects, as picture frame, window, envelope, etc. 

Basket and raffia work. 

Clay Modelling. — Natural objects, as orange, apple, onion, tomato, 
potato, egg, simple leaf. 

Common objects, as box, bird's house, small loaf of bread, cup (with- 
out handle) and saucer, flower pot and saucer, basket, tea set and tray. 

Note. — In the above, all modelling should be done from the actual object, as many 
being provided as will enable each child to make a thorough examination. 

Free modelling. 

Note 1.— Under this head the children should make what they wish, and should be 
encouraged to invent forms and patterns for themselves. 

Note 2. — Clay modelling should be so treated as to become an aid to conception of 
form. It should also be correlated with nature study. 

Physiology and Hygiene. — General observations of the body. Simple 
lessons on the hair, teeth, skin and nails, and on the care of the organs of the 
senses. Very simple lessons on eating, drinking, breathing, sleeping, and 
cleanliness for the purpose of forming good habits. 

Note. — Physiology and Hygiene should, as far as possible, be made a phase of the 
observational work in Nature Study. 

Nature Study. — Animal life : General appearance and habits of pet 
animals, their care and food ; domestic animals on the farm, their care, habits 
and uses; birds, their nesting, song, food, migrations in the autumn; meta- 
morphosis of a few conspicuous butterflies or moths. 

Plant Life : Work in school garden or in window-boxes ; study of a 
plant, as a geranium or pansy, from slip or seed to flower; caring for plants 
in pots; buds, their preparation for winter, their development; autumn leaves, 
collections, forms, tints; economic fruits, collection, forms how stored for 
winter, fruit as seed holders, dissemination of seeds; roots and stems, uses, 
comparison of fleshy forms, how stored for winter. 

Life on the Farm : Harvesting, primitive and modern methods com- 
pared; preparation for winter; the barn and its uses; activities of the farm 
during winter ; winter sports and social life on the farm ; the varied operations 
of spring time ; spring time as awakening to new life ; effects of sun and 
moisture on the soil. 

Form II. 

Reading. — Intelligent and intelligible natural reading. Second Read- 
er. Supplementary reading. Phonic Drill. Use of the dictionary begun. 
Exercises in breathing, articulation, and vocalization. 

Spelling. — Oral spelling, easy words in common use, careful attention 
to spelling in all written exercises ; dictation of assigned passages in readers ; 
difficult words and phrases taught from the blackboard. 

Literature. — Literature suited to the interest and capacity of pupils ; 
learning and reciting of literary gems. 



1904 .EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 125 



Composition. — Application of the terms, sentence and paragraph, in con- 
nection with reading lessons and written exercises, Oral and written 
compositions on topics connected with nature work, geography, history, etc. ; 
reproduction of stories told or read; narration of personal experiences; des- 
cription of familiar places, objects, or pictures; simple letter writing; atten- 
tion to the correctness of English in conversation and in all oral and written 
exercises; pjroper use of common punctuation marks, capitals, abbrevia- 
tions, simple uses of the apostrophe. 

History. — Classical myths and stories : Bible stories ; stories connect- 
ed with pioneer life, especially in the district in which the school is located ; 
biographical sketches of early discoverers and early explorers. 

.NoTE.-^-For Bible stories, the following are suggested : Moses, Joshua, Samuel, 
Saul, David, Solomon; and for the other biographies: the Cabots, Cartier, Champlain, 
Brebeuf, Lalemant, La Salle, Frontenac, Fraser, Thompson, Henry, Iberville, Cook, 
Vancouver, Mackenzie, Selkirk, the Norsemen, Columbus, Magellan, Cortes, De Soto, 
Gilbert, Raleigh. 

Geography. — -Continued observation of local land and water forms. 
Observation of highest points in the neighborhood, the chief slopes, hills, 
valleys, divides, etc. Special study of a brook, creek, or river, to see origin, 
direction, size, work of draining, eroding, carrying, plant and animal life 
along banks, etc. Representation by drawing and modelling of typical sur- 
face features actually observed by pupil. The earth as a whole : Form, size, 
rotation, cause of day and night; sources of heat and light. Introduction 
to globe and map of the world. Surface : Continents, islands, oceans. 
Local commerce : Articles of exchange, collecting and distributing centres, 
water supply and sources of food in urban centres, means of transportation, 
routes. Observation of weather: Winds, direction, force; clouds; rainfall; 
frost; changes of season; characteristic features of each season; systematic 
weather records; general notions of climate; record of moon's phases, with 
drawings of their appearance. People of the locality, nationalities, appear- 
ance, original homes, etc. ; child life in other lands. Location of any places 
of historical interest in the neighborhood. 

Arithmetic. — The grouping and separating of numbers continued; 
mental arithmetic; addition, subtraction, multiplication, division. Rela- 
tion of wholes to parts and parts to wholes ; measurements continued ; use of 
arithmetical signs and fractional forms in expressing simple relations ; nota- 
tion and numeration to 1, 000,000*8; Roman notation to one hundred. Ac- 
curacy, rapidity and neatness of work should be kept in view. 

Writing. — Correct position and penholding. Movement exercises. 
Small letters and capitals. Spacing and joining. Copybooks, or graded 
exercises prepared by the teacher. 

Art. — Study of color continued. Color and freehand expression. 

Free drawing of plants and other common objects; pencil sketches of 
common objects. 

Water colors : Fall flowers and leaves with brilliant autumn tints ; 
butterflies and other insects; live or mounted birds; fish, etc. 

Memory, imaginative, and illustrative drawing. 

Study of pictures. , 

Constructive Work. — Work of Form I. continued. Paper cutting for 
simple patterns and designs. Ruling in geometric forms and coloring these. 
Simple cardboard and paper construction, as wall-box, chair, trav, etc. Or- 
namentation of constructed objects by coloring and drawing. Modification 
of models: original 'work. Basket and raffia work. 

Clay Modelling. — Natural forms : Apple, beet, banana, leaf, apple and 
twig, etc. 



126 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Common objects: Cup with handle and saucer, flower pot, bat, piece 
of coal, etc. 

Free modelling. 

Needlework. — Simple stitches; sewing on buttons and hooks; simple 
mending. 

Physiology and Hygiene. — Course in Form I. continued. Simple 
lessons on digestion, exercise, cleanliness, and ventilation. Lessons on the 
organs of the body, that can be taught by the Nature Study Method. General 
effects of tea, coffee, alcohol, and tobacco. 

Nature Study. — Course of Form I. continued. Animal life : Life 
history and habits of domestic animals and of familiar wild animals, as the 
squirrel, chipmunk, robin, crow; earth-worm, habits, structure, uses; toad, 
habits, structure, uses; observation of live insects and their activities, com- 
parison of young and adult stages. 

Plant Life : Co-operative and individual work in school garden ; 
cultivation of plants in pots with observation of the development of leaves 
and flowers ; parts of leaves and flowers ; change of flower to fruit and of f riut 
to seed ; functions of the parts of flowers ; the forms and uses of trees ; activi- 
ties connected with forestry and lumbering, with study of pioneer life and 
present conditions on the prairie. 

Observation of farm, garden, and household operations. 

Form III. 

Reading. — Intelligent and intelligible natural reading; Third Reader. 
Supplementary reading. Use of the dictionary taught and practised. Exer- 
cises in breathing, articulation, and vocalization. 

Spelling. — Careful attention to spelling in all written exercises, par- 
ticularly in composition. Words in common use. Dictation of passages 
selected from readers, the spelling book, and other books. 

Literature. — Books suited to the capacity of the pupils; learning and 
reciting of suitable selections in both prose and poetry. 

Composition. — Course for Form II. continued. Narrative, descrip- 
tive, and epistolary composition of several paragraphs. Punctuation. Busi- 
ness forms, such as bills, receipts, orders, due bills. Attention to correct- 
ness of English in conversation and in all the school exercises. Language 
lessons on the following topics : The simple sentence; subject and predicate; 
the assertive, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory forms of sentences; 
gender, case, and number forms; direct and indirect narration. 

History. — The course of Form II. continued. Biographical sketches 
of persons famous in history. Short connected stories of the early history of 
Canada till the capture of Quebec (1759). Short stories of the early history 
of Britain till the Norman conquest. Biblical stories; the rise and fall of the 
Kingdom of Israel. A simple account of the municipal form of government 
in the locality. 

Note. — In Biography the following are suggested : Cyrus, Constantine, Moham- 
med, Galileo; King Alfred, William the Conqueror, Thomas a Becket, Stephen Langton, 
Simon de Montford, Chaucer, the Black Prince, Wycliffe, Joan of Arc, the Kingmaker, 
Caxton, Mary Queen of Scots ; Brant, Brock, Tecumseh, Laura Secord. 

Geography. — The Course of Form II. continued. An elementary 
course defined as follows : 

The earth as a whole. — The earth in space : Observation of phases of 
the moon; relation of the earth and moon to each other; rotation of the 
earth, direction, time and rate, effects; revolution of the earth, path, direc- 
tion, time and effects; general observation of stars; difference between fixed 






1904: EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 127 



stars and planets; observation of position of north star. Necessity and use 
of imaginary lines; great and small circles, latitude and longitude, elemen- 
tary notions only. Relief: world slopes. Drainage: world water partings, 
world basins, world river system, heat belts, light belts. Continents: loca- 
tions, relief, drainage, and coast line of each continent. Local, physical, and 
political geography : relation of township, town or city to county, of county 
to province, of province to country, position of country in continent. Observa- 
tion and description of the occupations of men and of local industries, em- 
phasizing those that are typical. Collection of pictures, sketches, materials, 
and products. Dependence of local industries and commerce on soil, climate 
and other local physical conditions ; and consequent localization of settlement, 
routes of travel, mills, villages, towns, and cities. 

North America. — Location and surroundings, form, coast line, relief, 
drainage, climate, political divisions ; special conditions which determine and 
affect various industries, as agriculture, grazing, lumbering, mining, hunt- 
ing, manufacturing; comparison of representative sections with reference to 
vegetable and animal life, and social conditions and progress of peoples; 
comparison of typical commercial centres, noting the sources of their wealth 
and power; the relation of climate to labor and production; water power; 
methods and routes of distribution and transportation. 

Canada. — Study of the Dominion as a whole and in sections, with more 
particular study of Ontario. 

Arithmetic. — Notation and numeration reviewed and continued. Prac- 
tice to secure accuracy and a reasonable degree of rapidity in fundamental 
operations. Cancellation. Application of fundamental processes to pro- 
blems of daily life. Standard units and tables, including metric system. 
Easy problems in measurements. Reduction processes and compound rules. 
Relation of parts to wholes and wholes to parts continued ; simple fractions ; 
decimals in connection with money and units of metric system. Mental 
arithmetic. Accuracy, rapidity, and neatness of work should be kept in view. 

Writing. — Course of Form II. continued. Copy-books, or graded 
exercises prepared by the teacher. Business papers. 

Art. — Drawing of plants, insects, etc, in any appropriate medium. 

Arrangement in spaces, applications in borders, surface patterns and 
rosettes in color, applied as far as possible in connection with constructive 
work. , , 

Relative positions of views of geometrical figures in thin cardboard ; 
simple geometrical problems. Study and drawing of details of Greek orna- 
ment and vase. 

Water color : Course of Form II. continued. 

Simple landscapes from window or out-of-doors. 

Study of pictures. 

Constructive Work. — Cardbfoard construction and ornamentation 
continued. Whittling in wood with a knife. 

Basket and raffia work. . ■ . . 

Needlework. — Plain hemming and back-stitching ; making buttonholes; 
fine mending. 

Physiology and Hygiene.— The Course of Form II.. continued, with 
more special study of the growth, waste, and renewal of the body, and the 
effects of narcotics and stimulants on the various processes. 

Nature Study.— Course of Form II. continued. . 

Animal Life : Adaptation of different kinds of animals to their respec- 
tive habits and surroundings; birds, life history of types, habits of (wrild 
fowl in different seasons; fish, forms and uses of different parts of the body, 
food and how obtained : life histories of moths, butterflies, beetles and grass- 



128 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



hoppers; useful insects, as ladybird and dragon fly; harmful insects; Nature's 
insecticides. 

Plant Life : Germination of seeds under controllable conditions and m 
the school garden and window boxes; opening of buds; study of the form* 
and functions of the parts of plants, and comparison of these forms and func- 
tions in different plants ; observation of the culture of farm and garden crops 
and of orchard and shade trees ; the observing and the distinguishing of the 
common forest trees. 

Different kinds of soil, as sand, gravel, loam, leaf-mould and clay ; ex- 
periments to ascertain how soils are composed, whether of mineral or of 
decayed organic material, and which best retains water. Additional phen- 
omena of spring in the vicinity of the school, cause of snow melting, ice 
floating, etc. ; how nature prepares the soil for growth of plants. Distinc- 
tion, between hard and soft, pure and impure water; tests and methods of 
purification of water. 

Sources of Heat : Experiments to show the effects of heat in the ex- 
pansion of solids, liquids and gases; practical applications. Temperature; 
thermometer, construction and graduation. Methods of transmission of heat, 
conduction, convection, and radiation; causes of winds and ocean currents; 
ventilation. 

Form IV. 

Reading. — Intelligent and intelligible natural reading. Fourth 
Reader. Supplementary reading. Exercises in breathing, articulation, and 
vocalization. 

Spelling. — Careful attention to spelling in all school exercises. Sim- 
ple rules for spelling*. Words in common use. Dictation of passages select- 
ed from readers, spelling book, and other books. 

Literature. — Books suited to the interest and capacity of the pupils. 
Learning and reciting of suitable selections in both poetry and prose. 

Composition. — Varied oral and written composition exercises in connec- 
tion with all school subjects. Special attention to correctness of spelling, 
punctuation, use of capitals, choice and correct form of words ; and to clear- 
ness, conciseness, freedom, and comprehensiveness of expression. Business 
papers, business and social correspondence. Topical outlines. Critical at- 
tention to correctness of English in conversation and in all school exercises. 

History. — The most important events in Canadian and British history, 
especially during the nineteenth century. Supplementary reading contain- 
ing especially interesting biographical accounts of persons famous in Cana- 
dian and British history. A brief outline of the duties of citizenship and 
of the provisions for civil government in Canada. The history of the locality 
in which the school is situated. 

Note 1. — The chief object of the course is to arouse an interest in historical 
reading and to give an acquaintance with those leading points in our history which 
every citizen should know. The pupil now takes up the subject according to the 
chronological and logical sequence of events. Besides the class text book, which pre- 
sents the subject in this order, supplementary reading in biography should be provided 
in the school library, and the public library should also be utilized. Where a suitable 
supply of books cannot be obtained, the teacher should read to the pupils. 

Note 2. — In biography, the following names are suggested : Wolsey, Elizabeth, 
Shakespeare, Cromwell, Milton, Robert Walpole, the Pitts, Montcalm, Frederick the 
Great, Nelson, Wellington, Washington, Lincoln, Peel, Stephenson, Howard, Rowland 
Hill, Tennyson ; also the following : Clive, Hastings, Lawrence, Havelock ; Wolfe, 
Carleton, Brock, Elgin, Macdonald ; Cook, Phillips; Bartle Frere, Cecil Rhodes. These 
names, taken in connection with those in Form III, furnish points of interest in every 
epoch of the history of Canada and the mother land. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 129 



English Grammar. — The sentence. Subject and predicate. The func- 
tional value of words* phrases, and clauses. Kinds of sentences. The main 
classes of words and the inflections and conjugations. The elementary prin- 
ciples of syntax. Analysis of easy sentences. Parsing. 

Note. — Formal grammar is now introduced. This introduction should be of a 
simple character, suited to. the as yet undeveloped logical capacity of the pupils. The 
subject should be taken up inductively and the results secured by examination and 
comparison of easy examples. The analysis and parsing should be simple and free from 
mechanical routine, as little technical language being used as possible, and the greatest 
care being taken to acquire a competent knowledge of the terms used. The inflections 
and conjugations should be thoroughly memorized. The principles of good English 
should be applied in the correction of bad English, and the subject should be correlated 
with both oral and written composition. At this stage, however, the application of 
these principles will be found to be a very limited one. It is constant use and practice 
under neverfailing watch and correction that makes good writers and speakers. In the 
earlier years of the pupils' course the application of direct authority is the most effi- 
cient corrective. 

Geography. — Course of Form III. continued, with special attention to 
the commercial geography of Canada, Great Britain, and the United States. 
Observation of some of the more prominent constellations as the Dippers, 
Orion, Cassiopeia, and of planets visible in the early evening. 

Climate : Distribution of light and heat ; observation of sun's apparent 
movements through the year; light zones, how determined, names, boun- 
daries, variations in length of day and night; isothermal lines, heat belts, 
general location, cause of variation from light zones, boundaries, move- 
ments; winds, cause, winds of torrid and temperate belts, land and sea 
breezes, peculiar winds, uses of winds ; observation of the progress of storms 
by means of daily weather records and government weather maps; ocean 
currents, general character, names and location of those of chief importance; 
rainfall, amount, how measured, regions of great rainfall; deserts. 

Eurasia : Topics similar to those relating to North America outlined 
in Form III. ; comparison with North America. 

South America, Africa, Australia, and the Continental Inlands : A 
brief study with reference to the principal physical and political divi- 
sions, more particular attention being given to the component parts of the 
British Empire; resources, industries, productions; routes of travel and com- 
merce; centres of population, conditions of the peoples. 

Arithmetic. — Cancellation continued ; measures, multiples. Fractional 
notation continued; vulgar and decimal fractions. Application of arith- 
metical processes to simple business transactions in percentage, as simple 
interest, commission, and insurance. Mental arithmetic. Accuracy, rapid- 
ity, and neatness of work should be kept in view. 

Note. — The processes and problems should be such as find direct application in 
ordinary business life. Easy mensuration and the metric system (continued) may be 
added to this course for pupils who do not go beyond the Fourth Form. These subjects, 
however, will not be required at the High School Entrance Examination. 

Writing. — Course of Form III. continued. Copy-books, or graded 
exercises prepared by the teacher. Pupils should be taught to be self-critical 
in respect to legibility, beauty, and rapidity. 

Book-Keeping (Optional). — Single entry; daybook and ledger, including 
personal and cash accounts. Business papers, with special attention to the 
mechanical details of business practice. 

Note— This course is intended for pupils who do not. go beycnd the Fourth Form. 

Art. — The Course of Form III. continued. 



130 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Adaptation of natural forms to purposes of decorative design. 
Freehand perspective. . 

Simple geometrical drawing, combination of units of design in geo- 
metric patterns, combination of scrolls and geometric units for industrial 
and ornamental work. 

TW>rking drawings of type forms. 
Simple geometrical problems. 

Manual Training (Optional). — Use of simpler wood-working tools, as 
saw, chisel, plane, rule, gauge. Exercises embodied in a complete useful 
model, and intended to give facility in the use of these tools, as laying out 
and truing up pieces to dimensions; cutting grooves; making of objects easily 
constructed and either useful or ornamental, as rulers, keyracks, boxes, 
brackets, brushholders, penracks, inkstands, school apparatus, etc. Short 
talks on the construction of tools and, on the material used. 

Household Science (Optional). — The home, its function, care of the 
house; various rooms and their uses; division of work in the care of house, 
preparation of food, cleaning methods, etc. Examination and study of equip- 
ment in classroom. Detailed study of methods of cooking with the object of 
acquiring facility of manipulation and measurement as well as a knowledge 
of the processes of cookery; boiling, simmering, steeping, steaming, broiling, 
pan -broiling, sauteing, frying, baking; each method to be illustrated by the 
cooking of one or more articles of food after the principles have been care* 
fully studied. Fuels : coal, wood, gas, electricity, kerosene, alcohol, gaso- 
line, coke; building and care of fires. Effects of heat upon common food 
materials, water, fresh and dried fruit, non-starchy vegetables, potatoes, 
legumes, breakfast cereals, flour (a study for thickening purposes only), milk, 
eggs, meat, fish. The composition and nutritive value of each food — a simple 
study only. Classification of foods. 

Fruit preserving, canning, etc. Yeasts, combination and cooking of 
various food materials. 

Planning, cooking, and serving a meal; marketing, cost; routine of work, 
table setting, serving; table manners. 

Care of kitchen, utensils, etc.; dish washing; towels; special methods 
of cleaning, tin, granite, iron, brass, wood. 

Laundry studies, with simple equipment. Soft and hard water, hot and 
cold water; soap, soda, etc., their effect upon various fabrics; preparation of 
clothes for laundry ; removal of stains ; starching and ironing. 

Course of Form III. in needlework continued; cutting and making simple 
garments. 

Physiology and Hygiene. — General observations of bones and muscles. 
Elementary study of the organs of circulation and respiration and their func- 
tions. Ventilation; the relation of respiration to health with special refer- 
ence to disinfectants, exercise, and clothing. Vocal organs and their func- 
tions ; cultivation and care, of the voice. Relation of the nervous system to 
health and exercise. Continued study of the effects of stimulants and nar- 
cotics. 

Nature Study. — Course of Form III. continued. Animal life; relation 
of fish, birds, and wild animals to man; life histories of conspicuous and 
economic insects; organs and functions. 

Plant life; study of organs of plants and their functions; study of econo- 
mic and wild plants from seed to fruit in the school garden, home garden, 
farm, and forest; weeds injurious to crops and methods of destroying them; 
buds and twigs; wood, rings, grain, and bark, uses, etc. 

Observing local minerals and rocks, their properties and uses; experi- 
ments to show composition of soils and their relation to drainage, tempera- 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 131 



hire, etc.; varieties of soils adapted to different crops; fertilizers, etc. Im- 
plements and tools used on the farm and in the household, mechanical prin- 
ciples applied in their construction. 

The atmosphere; its composition; combustion, simple experiments, study 
of candle flame products; changes produced in the air by respiration; re- 
ciprocal relation of plants and animals as regards the atmosphere ; impurities 
in air. 

Gravity; air and liquid pressure, the barometer. Cohesion and ad- 
hesion, the nature of these forces; phenomenon of solution and diffusion; 
amorphous and crystalline forms of matter. Practical use of heat, steam, 
and electricity in connection with the study of industries. 

Form V. 

Reading. — Intelligent and intelligible natural reading. The principles 
learned incidentally. Exercises in breathing, articulation, and vocalization. 
Grammar. — The principles of etymology and syntax, including the logi- 
cal structure of the sentence, and the inflection and classification of words. 
The elementary analysis of words, with the most important prefixes and suf- 
fixes and Latin and Greek root-words. 

Note. — At first the work should be confined to a thorough review of the course 
prescribed for the fourth form, and the practical value of the subject in connection 
with English composition should be emphasized. The more reflective study should be 
taken up later. The use of English Grammar in teaching correct expression is, how- 
ever, secondary to the insight it gives into the structure of our thinking and expression. 

Composition. — Oral and written composition, chiefly narrative and des- 
criptive. Letter writing. Oral and written reproductions or abstracts. 
Class debates. The systematic and careful application of the principles of 
good English to the correction of mistakes made by the pupils in speaking 
and writing. The main principles of composition (rhetoric) learned incident- 
ally from the criticism of compositions, and systematized as the work proceeds. 

Literature. — Intelligent comprehension of suitable authors, both prose 
and poetry. Systematic oral reading in the class. Memorization and re- 
citation of choice selections in prose and poetry. 

Note. — (1) The object of the course is the cultivation of a taste for good litera- 
ture, not by minute critical study, but by reading at home and in school, aloud and 
silently, with due attention to the meaning, standard works which will appeal to the 
interest and quicken the imagination of the pupil. Such works should be chiefly narra- 
tive, descriptive, and dramatic. 

Note. — (2) In each of the forms three or four books (both prose and poetry 1 * should 
be read each year as class-work. Part of such books should be read at home or during 
study periods, and reviewed in class with special reference to the more difficult pass- 
ages. It is further recommended that, at the beginning of each school year, a short 
list be made out under a few heads of such suitable books as may be obtained in the 
school, public or other library, and that each pupil be required to read during the 
year at least one under each head, in addition to those taken up in class. The work in 
literature should be systematically correlated with that in oral and written compo- 
sition. 

History. — The leading events of the History of Canada, followed by an 
outline of British history. Supplementary reading and interesting bio- 
graphical sketches of persons famous in Canadian and British history. The 
history of the locality. The elements of the civil government of Great Bri- 
tain and Canada, and the duties of citizenship. 

Note 1. — The main purpose of the course at this stage is to train the pupils to 
grasp the leading events in their logical order, and to arouse an interest in historical 
reading. As soon as practicable, a beginning should be made in appreciating the logical 
connection of events. Pupils should be trained to use the school, public, and other 
libraries for reference purposes and for supplementary reading. 
12 E 



132 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Note 2. — The work in History should be systematically correlated with that in 
oral and written composition, and so much geography should be taken up as will 
secure intelligent comprehension of the topics dealt with. 

Arithmetic and Mensuration. — Arithmetic — Review of principles; 
measures, multiples ; the metric system ; fractions (vulgar and decimal) ; con- 
tracted methods of computation; square root; percentage; commercial arith- 
metic, interest, discount, commission, etc. Mental arithmetic. 

Mensuration. — The rectangle, the triangle,, the parallelogram, the circle, 
the parallelopiped, the prism, and the cylinder. 

JNote. The processes and problems in the commercial work should be such as find 
direct application in ordinary business life. Accuracy, rapidity and neatness of work; 
should be kept in view. 

Algebra. — Elementary work, factoring, highest common factor and low- 
est common multiple, easy simple equations, easy fractions. 

Geometry. — Definitions; fundamental geometric conceptions and prin- 
ciples; use of simple instruments, compasses, protractor, graded rule, set- 
square ; measurement of lines and angles, and construction of lines and angles 
of given numerical magnitude; accurate construction of figures; some lead- 
ing propositions in Euclidean plane geometry reached by induction as a result 
of the accurate construction of figures ; deduction also employed as principles 
are received and assured. 

.Note. — The course should emphasize physical accuracy as well as accuracy of 
thought ; exactness in drawing lines of required length, in measuring lines that are 
drawn, in constructing angles of given magnitude, and in measuring angles that have 
been constructed. Where desired, the course in Euclid (See Appendix C), may be 
taken up. 

Geography. — The building up of the earth, the modern earth, the ocean, 
the atmosphere, life on the earth, the heavens, commerce. 

For the details of the course, see Appendix A. 

Note. — Excursions should be made where possible and desirable, especially in con- 
nection with the study of rocks, minerals, soils and land formation of the district, and 
of the work of a stream, river or lake, all of which should be emphasized in due 
course. 

Elementary Science. — An elementary course in Botany, Zoology, and 
Physics. 

For the details of the course, see Appendix B. 

Note 1. — The objects of the course are to train pupils in correct observation and 
deduction ; to give, in connection with the instruction in Geography, a fair knowledge 
of the world around them to those who will remain at school only a year or so ; and to 
lay the foundation for the more detailed study of each subject in the case of those who 
will continue the work. The spirit of the Nature Study of the lower forms should be 
retained, but the teacher should introduce a more systematic treatment of the subject 
with such organization of the material in Botany and Zoology as will lead to simple 
classification. The course should be correlated with Geography, Drawing, and Com- 
position. 

Note 2. — Under each of the sub-heads in Appendix B, full details are given of the 
courses. The order of the topics, however, is merely a suggested one. In Botany and 
Zoology, the extent and the character of the details of each topic are left to the prin- 
cipal and the teacher, and should be determined by the accessibility of the material and 
other local considerations. The course in these subjects should be practical throughout. 
Each pupil shouTd possess a good lens and be taught how to use it. Approved methods 
of collecting and preserving botanical specimens and of keeping live animals suitable 
for study should be systematically followed. An herbarium and a museum of local 
specimens should be provided where practicable. The pupils should be encouraged to 






1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 133 



provide specimens from the locality. Much of the practical work, especially the observa- 
tions, will necessarily be done out of doors by the pupils alone, under the direction of 
the teacher, or by the pupils, conducted by the teacher. The course in Physics shall be 
experimental as far as possible, and the pupils should be encouraged to work at home 
and to prepare simple apparatus. The amount of the apparatus required is at the dis- 
cretion of the Public School inspector. 

Note 3. — Books for reference and for supplementary reading should be provided in 
the school library. Systematic written descriptions and drawing should be required 
throughout the course, and the exercises should* be dated and presented for comparison 
and inspection, the work being systematically supervised by the teacher. In none of 
the science subjects shall notes be dictated by the teacher. 

Art.— Course of Form IV. continued. Drawing from models in light 
.and shade, and color. Memory drawing in both outline and shade. Simple 
principles of freehand perspective. 

Commercial Subjects. — Book-keeping and Business Papers. • Single 
entry and double entry. Use of journal-day-book, cash-book, bill-book, and 
ledger. Receipts, promissory-notes, drafts, orders, due-bills, deposit-slips, 
checks, bills, invoices, accounts; indorsement and acceptance and consequent 
liability. 

Stenography. — The theory. Dictation, transcription. 

Writing. — Correct position and movement; principles of letter-formation; 
graceful, legible business hand, etc. 

Typewriting. — Copying documents?, transcription of shorthand notes, 
manifolding, letter-press copying. Touch system recommended. 

Agriculture, Manual Training, and Household Science. By direc- 
iion of the Board, and with the concurrence of the inspector and with a 
programme and a time-table approved by him, a short course in Agriculture 
may be taken up, chiefly in connection with suitable topics under Geography 
and Elementary Science. For suggestive details, see the High School Special 
Lower School Course in Agriculture. Under the same conditions courses 
may also be provided in Manual Training and Household Science. For sug- 
gestive details, see the High School Special Lower School Courses in these 
subjects. 



SCHEDULE II. 
High School Programme of Studies. 
General. 

Manners and Morals. — Throughout the High School course the 
teacher should incidentally, from current incidents, from lessons in liter- 
ature, history, etc., occasionally by anecdotes and didactic talks, and by 
his own example as well as by precept, seek to give instruction in moral 
principles and practices and in good manners. 

The following outline is suggested : — 

Duties to oneself : Purity, health, nobility, self-control, self-reli- 
ance, generosity, truthfulness, good taste in dress, cultivation of will power, 
economy, moral value of work. etc. 

Duties in schooj to teachers and to fellow pupils : — Obedience, punctu- 
ality, neatness, order, etc. 

Duties in the home : Respect for parents, consideration for brothers 
jmd sisters, the weak, the aged, etc. 

Duties to the lower animals : Kindness, etc. 



134 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Duties to the people generally : Honesty, courtesy, charity, toleration, 
justice, etc. 

Duties to our country : Patriotism, courage, honor, obedience to law, 
etc. 

Manners : Proper conduct at home, at school, on the street, and in 
public places, at social gatherings, etc. 

Physical Culture — Throughout the High School course, a systematic 
and well-develoed course of exercises in Drill and Calisthenics, both free 
and with apparatus, and in Gymnastics, when practicable, should be taken 
up in each of the sub-divisions (See Reg. 41.) While dependent to some 
extent upon the accommodations and equipment, the exercises should al- 
ways be suitable in character and frequency to the age and physical condi- 
tion of individual pupils. The main object of the course is the symmetri- 
cal development of the body, securing at the same time strength and grace 
with correct and prompt obedience to the will. School games and sports 
should be systematically encouraged. 

Lower School. 

Reading. — Intelligent and intelligible natural reading. The princi- 
ples learned incidentally. Exercises in breathing, articulation, and vo- 
calization. 

English Grammar. — The principles of etymology and syntax, includ- 
ing the logical structure of the sentence and the inflection and classifica- 
tion of words. The elementary analysis of words, with the most impor- 
tant prefixes and suffixes and Latin and Greek root- words. An elemen- 
tary knowledge of the formation of the sounds of the language, with their 
representation by means of the alphabet. An outline of the history of the 
development of the language. 

Note. — The use of English Grammar in teaching correct oral and written compo- 
sition, though important especially when the principles of good English can be intelli- 
gently applied, is secondary to the insight it gives into the structure of our thinking 
and expression. For the first year the work should be confined to a thorough review 
and slight extension of the course prescribed for the fourth form of the Public Schools, 
and the practical value of the subject in connection with English composition should 
be emphasized. The intensive and more reflective study should be reserved for the later 
years of the course. 

English Composition. — Oral and written composition, chiefly narra- 
tive and descriptive. Letter writing. Oral and written reproductions or 
abstracts. Class debates. The systematic and careful application of the 
principles of good English to the correction of mistakes made by the pupils 
in speaking and writing. The main principles of composition (rhetoric) 
learned incidentally from the criticism of the compositions, and systematiz- 
ed as the work proceeds. 

English Literature. — Intelligent comprehension of suitable authors, 
both prose and poetry. Systematic oral reading in class. Memorization 
and recitation of choice selections in prose and poetry. 

Note 1. — The object of the course in the Lower school is the cultivation of a taste 
for good literature, not by minute critical study, but by reading at home and in school, 
aloud and silently, with due attention to the meaning, standard authors whose words 
will quicken the imagination and present a strong element of interest. Such authors 
should be chiefly narrative, descriptive, and dramatic. 

Note 2.— In each of the forms, three or four books (both prose and poetry) should 
be read each year as class work. Part of such books should be read at home or during 
study periods, and reviewed in class with special reference to the more difficult passages. 



I 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 135 



It is further recommended that, at the beginning of each school year, a short list be 
made out for each form, under a few heads, of such suitable works as may be obtained 
in the school, public, or other library, and that each pupil be required to read during 
the year at least one under each head in addition to those taken up in class. The work 
in Literature should be systematically correlated with that in oral and written compo- 
sition. 

History. — The leading events of the history of Canada, followed by 
an outline of British history. Supplementary reading and interesting bi- 
ographical sketches of persons famous in Canadian and British history and 
in Greek and Roman history. The history of the locality. The elements 
of the civil government of Britain and Canada, and the duties of citizen- 
ship. 

Note 1. — The main purpose of the course at this stage is to train the pupils to grasp 
the leading events in their logical order, and to arouse an interest in historical reading. 
As soon as practicable, a beginning should be made in appreciating the logical con- 
nection of events. Pupils should be trained to use the school, public, and other 
libraries for reference purposes and for supplementary reading. 

Note 2. — The work in History should be systematically correlated with that in oral 
and written composition, and so much geography should be taken up as will secure in- 
telligent comprehension of the topics dealt with. 

Arithmetic and Mensuration. — Arithmetic — Keview of principles ; 
measures, mutiples ; the metric system ; fractions (vulgar and decimal) ; 
contracted methods of computation ; square root ; percentage, interest, dis- 
count, commission, insurance, stock, exchange. Mental arithmetic. 

Mensuration. — The rectangle, the triangle, the parallelogram, the 
circle, the parallelopiped, the prism, the cylinder. 

Note. — The processes and problems in the commercial work should be such as find 
direct application in ordinary business life. Accuracy, rapidity, and neatness of work 
should be aimed at. Proofs of the more difficult formulae in mensuration are not re- 
quired. During the first year the study of Arithmetic should be an intensive one, the 
work of the Public Schools being thoroughly reviewed. After the first year the stress 
should be placed upon Algebra. 

Algebra. — Elementary work ; factoring ; highest common factor and 
lowest common multiple, fractions ; simple equations of one, two and three 
unknown quantities ; square root, cube root. 

Geometry. — Definitions; fundamental geometric conceptions and prin- 
ciples ; use of simple instruments, compasses, protractor, graded rule, set- 
square ; measurement of lines and angles, and construction of lines and 
angles of given numerical magnitude ; accurate construction of figures ; 
some leading propositions in Euclidean plane geometry, reached by induc- 
tion as the result of the accurate construction of figures ; deduction also 
employed as principles are reached and assured. The course in Euclid 
begun. 

For the details of the course in Euclid, see Appendix C. 

Note. — The introductory course in Practical Geometry, which is intended to be a 
six months' one, should emphasize physical accuracy of thought, exactness in drawing 
lines of required length, in measuring lines that are drawn, in constructing angles of 
given magnitude, and in measuring angles that have been constructed The course in 
Euclid retains his common notions, regarding them from modern standpoints. 

Latin and Greek. — The elementary Latin book, including introduc- 
tory work in the prose authors. The Greek book begun in the second 
year. 

Mote. — Throughout the courses in Latin and Greek, the main objects should be 
accuracy of knowledge of forms and syntax, accuracy of translation into idiomatic 
English and the ability to translate at sight. Attention should also be given to 
pronunciation and reading alo*d, and to the consideration of Latin and Greek words as 
the roots of English words. 



136 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12? 



French and German. — The elementary French and German books, in- 
cluding introductory work in authors. 

Note. — The work in French should at first be wholly without a text book, for the- 
training of the ear and tongue; grammar learned incidentally. Names of common 
objects, states, and actions. N Memorization of suitable selections from simple poetry. 
Reading anecdotes, short stories, and easy descriptions, with oral drill on the material 
read. After three or four months the systematic study of the elementary book should be 
begun, the work being chiefly oral. German should be begun!, in the same way the 
second year, but with greater apportionment of time, and more rapid progress. When 
desired, German may be begun first, being followed by French. 

Geography. — The building up of the earth, the modern earth, the 
ocean, the atmosphere, life on the earth, the heavens, commerce. 
For the details of the course see Appendix A. 

Note. — Excursions should be made where desirable, especially in connection with- 
the study of rocks, minerals, soils, and land formation of the district, and of the work of 
a stream, river or lake, all of which should be emphasized in due course. Books of 
travel and other supplementary reading in geographical subjects should be supplied ;, 
also, when practicable, exhibits of the material and products characteristic of the 
countries studied. The school lantern should be used for illustration. 

Elementary Science. — An elementary practical course in Botany, 
Zoology, Physics, and Chemistry. 

For the details of the course, see Appendix B. 

Note 1. — The objects of the course are to train pupils in correct observation and 
deduction, to give, in connection with the instruction in Geography, a fair knowledge of 
the world around them to those who will not remain at school more than a few years, 
and to lay tne foundation for the more detailed study of each subject in the case of 
those who will continue the work into the higher forms. The spirit of the Nature study 
of the Public Schools should be retained, but the teacher should introduce a more 
systematic treatment of the subject, with such organization of the material as will lead 
to simple classification and generalization. The course should be correlated with 
Geography, Drawing, and Composition. 

Note 2. — Uuder each of the subheads in Appendix B, full details are given of the 
course, which is intended to be at least a two years' one. The order of the topics,, 
however, is merely a suggested one. In Botany and Zoology, the extent and the 
character of the details are left to the principal and the teacher, and should be de- 
termined by the accessibility of the material and other local conditions. The courses 
in these subjects shall be practical throughout. Less attention should be given to the- 
identification of plants than has hitherto been usual, and more to morphology, phvsi- 
ology, and ecology. When desirable, the agricultural applications of the subject should 
be emphasized. .Each pupil should possess a good lens, and be taught how to use it. 
The compound microscope should be used regularly by the teacher for illustration. 
Approved methods of collecting and preserving botanical specimens and of keeping live 
animals suitable for study should be systematically followed. Much of the practical 
work, especially the observations, will necessarily be done out of doors by the pupils 
alone, under the direction of the teacher, or by the pupils conducted by the teacher. 

The course in Physics and Chemistry shall be as far as possible experimental, and 
the pupils should be encouraged to work at home and to prepare simple apparatus. 

Note 3. — When practicable there should be an aquarium, and every school should 
have an arboretum and a herbarium. A museum consisting of specimens illustrative 
of the courses should also be established. The pupils should be encouraged to provide 
specimens from the locality. 

Note 4. — Floras and faunas should be provided in the library; also other work* 
of reference, and the pupils should be encouraged to use them as supplementary 
reading, never as text-books or as substitutes for original work. Drawing and syste- 
matic written description should be required throughout the course, and the specimens 
should be dated and preserved in note books for comparison and inspection, the work 
being systematically supervised by the teacher. In none of the Science classes shall 
notes be dictated by the teacher. Every pupil should keep a calendar of the dates of 
(a) the unfolding of buds, (b) the flowering of plants, and (c) the first appearance of 
birds, insects, and other animals. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 137 



Some valuable publications on the subject of Nature Study and Elementary Science 
may be obtained free by teachers on application to the Department of Agriculture. 
Toronto. 

Art, — Drawing from models in light and shade and in color. Memory 
drawing in both outline and shade. Simple principles of freehand per- 
spective. Inventive illustrative drawing. Ornamental design, using 
outline and color, and introducing practical geometry and its application 
to design. Orthographic projection of type-forms and common objects. 
Isometric projection. 

JNote. — The course is intended to be a two years' one. 

Commercial Subjects. — Bookkeeping and Business Papers. Single 
entry and double entry. Use of journal day book, cash book, bill book, and 
ledger. Receipts, promissory notes, drafts, orders, due-bills, deposit slips, 
checks, bills, invoices, accounts. Indorsement and acceptance, and con- 
sequent liability. 

Note. — A minimum amount of two Double Entry sets and one Single Entry set, 
of about ten pages each, should be carefully worked out by each pupil in the course. 
Such sets should be the first work done in these sets, not copies of preliminary drafts. 
The course is intended to be a six months' one. 

Stenography. — The theory. Dictation and transcription. 

Writing. — Correct position and movement ; principles of letter forma- 
tion ; graceful legible business hand. 

Typewriting. — Copying documents, transcription of shorthand notes, 
manifolding, letter press copying. Touch system recommended. 

Middle School. 

English Composition. — Courses of the Lower School in oral and writ- 
ten narration and description continued. Exposition. Letter, writing. 
Oral and written reproduction or abstracts. Class debates. The study 
of models of prose writing systematically taken up towards the close of the 
course. : \ \ j j , j 

Note. The Debating and the Literary society should supplement the work in this 
subject. 

English Literature. — The intelligent and appreciative study of au- 
thors, both prose and poetry, including those prescribed for pass junior ma- 
triculation into the University of Toronto. Systematic oral reading in 
class. Supplementary reading provided by the pupils themselves and sup- 
plied from the school and the public or other library. Memorization and 
recitation of choice passages from the prescribed authors. 

Note. — At this stage, the pupils should be able to begin to appreciate literature 
as such. Besides works of the same character as those taken up in the Lower School, 
other works of a subjective character may be added. The purpose and the spirit of the 
author and the merits of his thoughts and style should now be moderately dealt with; 
his defects should not be emphasized. The chief object is still the cultivation of a taste 
for good literature, and the authors should be read partly in class and partly at home, 
both silently and aloud. 

History. — British History. Great Britain and Canada from 1763 to 
1885, with the outlines of the preceding periods of British History. 

Ancient History. — General outlines of the history of Greece to the fall 
of Corinth, and of the history of Rome to the death of Augustus, with a brief 
outline of the art, literature, philosophy, and social life of the Greeks and 
the Romans. 



138 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The geography relating to the British and the Ancient History. 

Note. 1. — The details of the political history are not so important as the causes 
and the consequences of 'events, and the social life, literature, art, etc., of the peoples. 
In British, (including Canadian) history the development of our political institutions 
should receive special attention. 

Note 2. — As in the Lower School the work in History should be correlated with 
that in oral and written composition as well as in geography. Although not prescribed 
for the Middle School course or for any of the examinations, it is recommended that the 
beginnings of civilization and of the Eastern nations be studied in outline before the 
periods prescribed in Ancient History are taken up. The great contemporary move- 
ments in the history of Europe should also be briefly discussed. 

Algebra. — The course in the Lower School reviewed and continued. 
Indices, surds ; quadratics of one and two unknown quantities, the relation 
between their roots and co-efficients. 

Geometry. — The course in the Lower School reviewed. A selection 
of the leading propositions of Euclid but with modifications in method of 
proof. Exercises and deductions on the propositions of the syllabus, the 
constructions in Practical Geometry being such as naturally spring from 
the course in Geometry prescribed for the Middle School. 

For the details of the course see Appendix C. 

Latin and Greek. — Course in the Lower School continued. Thf 
special study of the texts prescribed for pass junior matriculation into the 
University of Toronto, with sight work. 

French and German. — Course in the Lower School continued. The 
special study of the text prescribed for the pass junior matriculation into 
the University of Toronto, with sight work. 

Chemistry. — Course of the Lower School continued. Experimental 
illustration of the most important properties of Hydrogen, Chlorine, Oxy- 
gen, Sulphur, Nitrogen, Carbon, and their chief compounds, especially 
those of economic and industrial importance. Mixtures, solutions, chemical 
compounds, elements. Nomenclature. Laws of chemical combination. 
Combining weights, chemical formulae and equations, with easy numerical 
examples. 

Physics. — Lower School courses reviewed. An experimental course 
defined as follows : 

Heat. — Nature and sources of heat; thermometers; maximum den- 
sity of water; relation between volume and the temperature of a gas 
(Charles' Law).; absolute temperature; change of state; latent heat, speci- 
fic heat ; mechanical equivalents of heat, transmission of heat; simple prob- 
lems. 

Electricity. — Magnetism, laws of magnetic attraction and repulsion, 
phenomena and theories of magnetic induction, inclination and declination 
of the compass ; chemical effects of the electric current, electrolysis of di- 
lute acids and metallic salts, electroplating, electrotyping ; storage cells ; 
voltameters and principle of their use ; current induction and its general 
laws; transformer; induction-coil; direct current dynamo; telephone, mo- 
tor; simple notions of potential; Ohm's Law, shunts ; electrical units ; 
astatic and tangent galvanometers ; rheostat, experimental determination 
of current strength, resistance, electromotive force; best arrangement of 
electrical generators under given conditions, the joule and the watt. 

Sound. — Caused by vibrations ; illustration of vibrations, pendulums, 
rods, strings, membranes, manometric flames, plates, columns of air, pro- 
pagated by waves ; its velocity; determination of velocity : pitch; standard 
forks, acoustical C = 512, musical, A = 870; intervals; harmonic scale; 
diatonic scale ; equally tempered scale, vibration of air in open and closed 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 139 



tubes, with wave-length; resonators; nodes and loops; vibrations of strings 
and wires; reflection of sound. 

Light. — Rectilinear propagation ; image through a pin hole ; beam ; 
pencil ; photometry ; shadow and grease-spot photometers, reflection and 
scattering of light ; laws of reflection ; images in plane mirrors ; multiple 
images in inclined mirrors ; concave and convex mirrors ; drawing images ; 
refraction ; laws and index of refraction; total reflection; path through a 
prism ; lenses; drawing image produced by a lens; simple microscope ; dis- 
persion and color ; spectrum; recomposition of white light. 

Upper School. 

English Composition and Rhetoric. —Middle School course continu- 
ed. Argumentation. Course still both oral and written. Letter writ- 
ing. Class debates. Critical study of prose models. The principles of 
rhetoric systematically studied. 

Note. — As in the Middle School, the Debating and the Literary Society should 
supplement the work in this subject. 

English Literature. — The intelligent and appreciative study of au- 
thors, both prose and poetry, including those prescribed for honor junior 
matriculation into the University of Toronto. Systematic oral reading 
in class. Supplementary reading provided by the pupils themselves and, as 
in the Lower school, from the school and the public library. Memoriza- 
tion and recitation of choice passages from the prescribed authors. 

.Note. — At this stage the pupil should be able to read literature still more apprecia- 
tively ; but the chief object continues to be the cultivation of a taste for good 
literature, and critical study should be subordinated thereto. 

History. — Mediaeval and Modem History. — A brief outline. 

British History. — From the Discovery of America to 1763. 

For the details of the courses in Mediaeval and Modern History, see Appendix D. 

Note. — The subject should be dealt with as in the Middle School, but here, in 
particular, the comparative method should also be employed as far as practicable. The 
continuous history of Great Britain and Ireland and of the colonies should be taken 
up concurrently with that of the other European States. It is recommended that in 
connection with English composition, each pupil should select one or more topics 
to which he will devote special attention, utilizing for the purpose the books Of refer- 
ence available in the school, public, and other libraries. 

Algebra. — Work of Middle School continued. Theory of divisors, 
ratio, proportion and variation, progressions, scales of notation, permuta- 
tions and combinations, binomial theorem, interest forms, annuities, and 
sinking funds. 

Geometry. — The course in Geometry of the Middle School reviewed 
arid continued. An introductory course in Co-ordinate Geometry of the 
point, the straight Kne, and the circle. 

For the details of the course, see Appendix C. 

Trigonometry. — Trigonometrical ratios with their relations to one an- 
other; sines, etc., of the sum and difference of angles with deduced formu- 
lae. Use of Logarithms. Solution of triangles. Expression for the 
area of triangles. Radii of circumscribed, inscribed, and escribed circles. 

Latin and Greek. — Course of the Middle School in grammar and com- 
position continued. The special study of the authors prescribed for honors 
at matriculation into the University of Toronto, with sight work. 

French and German. — Course of the Middle School in grammar and 
composition continued. The special study of the authors prescribed for 
honors at matriculation into the University of Toronto, with sight work. 



140 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Physics. — An experimental course defined as follows : — 
Mechanics. — Measurement of velocity ; uniformly accelerated recti- 
lineal motion ; metric units of force, work, energy, and power ; equilibrium 
of forces acting at a point ; triangle, parallelogram, and polygon of forces, 
parallel forces : principle of moments ; centre of gravity; laws of friction; 
numerical examples. 

Hydrostatics. — Fluid pressure at a point; pressure on a horizontal 
plane; pressure on an inclined plane; resultant vertical pressure, and resul- 
tant horizontal pressure, when fluid is under air pressure and when not; 
transmission of pressure ; Bramah's press ; equilibrium of liquids of un- 
equal density in a bent tube ; the barometer ; air pump ; water pump, com- 
mon and force ; siphon. 

.Note. — The course in Electricity for the honor junior matriculation into the Uni- 
versity of Toronto is included in the Middle School course. Special class provision 
may, however, be made for the subject in the Upper School. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy. — An experimental course defined as fol- 
lows : — 

Chemistry. — Chemical theory of the Lower School reviewed and con- 
tinued. Chemical and physical reactions, rates of reactions, reversible re- 
actions, chemical equilibrium. The practical study of the following ele- 
ments, with their most characteristic compounds, having regard to Men- 
delejefPs classification of the elements, and some of the most important eco- 
nomic and industrial applications : Hydrogen, Sodium, Potassium, Mag- 
nesium, Zinz, Calicium, Strontium, Barium, Boron, Aluminum, Carbon, 
Silicon, Tin, Lead, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Arsenic, Antimony, Bismuth, 
Oxygen, Sulphur, Fluorine, Chlorine, Bromine, Iodine, Manganese, Iron, 
Copper, Nickel. 

Mineralogy. — General chemical composition of the earth's crust. 
Meaning of term mineral : crystalline state of matter; physical character 
of minerals, hardness, streak, lustre, specific gravity, studied from actual 
specimens. Meaning of terms, rock, ore. The rock-forming minerals,. 
Calcite, Quartz, Orthoclase, Plagioclase, Muscovite, Biotite, Hornblende, 
Pyroxene, Olivene, studied from hand specimens. Examination of hand 
specimens of the following rocks : — Igneous — Granite, Syenite, Diorite, 
Gabbro, Diabase, Basalt Aqueous — Sandstone, Conglomerate, Shale, Lime- 
stone. Metamorphic — Marble, Gneiss, Slate, Schists. Yeins — kinds,. 
how formed, how filled. 

Determination with the aid of simple mineral tables of the following : 
Magnetite, Hematite, Pyrite, Galena, Gypsum, Halite, Graphite, Mis- 
pickel, Pyrolusite, Stibnite, Zinc blende, Chalcopyrite. Occurrence of 

gold, silver, coal. Chief deposits of economic minerals in Canada. 

Note 1. — The Lower School course in Geology (under Geography) should be re- 
viewed in connection with the study of the minerals. 

Note 2. — Many of the minerals in the above list can be found in any well developed 
gravel pit, a stone pile, or the glacial boulders scattered widely over Ontario. Pupils 
should be required to make excursions in the neighborhood of the school for the pur- 
pose of obtaining them and observing the geological formations. 

Note 3. — The determination of the minerals shall be made by observation of their 
physical properties and by means of the blow-pipe. 

Biology. — Zoology. — The practical study of the external form and of 
the prepared skeleton of the various types prescribed. Prepared dissection* 
and, where necessary, models shall be used to convey an elementary know- 
ledge of the internal structure of the types. The pupil must sketch such 
preparations to ensure his careful study of them. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 14 1 



The Fish : Any one of the common fresh water fishes of Ontario ; 
special attention to the organs of locomotion, circulation, respiration. As 
several species are easily obtainable, this class may be employed for study-- 
ing the principles of zoological momenclature. 

The Frog : Comparison with the fish as to the organs above men^ 
tioned. Observation of the development of the spawn of one or more Am- 
phibia. 

The Reptile : A turtle and a snake. Comparison of both with a 
lizard. 

The Bird : Special attention to the plumage, the bill and feet, and 
of the modifications of the skeletal, muscular, and respiratory systems n 
connection with aerial life. Study of birds in relation to agriculture. 

The Mammal : Characters of the chief domesticated and wild mammals: 
of Ontario, as well as the main facts of internal structure of one of the 
smaller forms (e. g. the rabbit). Comparison of the teeth and feet of the 
pig, horse, sheep, rabbit, dog, mole, bat. 

The crayfish as a type of the arthropods. Comparison of the external 
form of the crayfish with that of an insect (e. g. grass hopper, cricket, cock- 
roach), also with that of a millipede and a spider. Insects injurious to ve-- 
getation ; the methods of combatting their attacks. 

Unsegmented and segmented worms. 

Fresh-water mussel and snail. 

A fresh-water unicellular animal, such as an Amoeba or Paramecium. 

The natural habits of the various animals studied. 

A general view of classification based upon comparison of the types 
studied. 

Mote. — When preferred, dissection of types may be substituted for the use of 
models and prepared specimens. 

Botany. — The practical study of representatives of the flowering plants 
of the locality in which the school is situated, and representatives of the 
chief sub-divisions of cryptogams, such as a fern, a lycoped, a horsetail, a 
liver- wort, a moss, a lichen, a mushroom and a chara with a general view 
of classification. An elementary knowledge of the microscopic structure 
of the bean and the maize. Drawings and descriptions of parts of plants, 
and classification. Comparison of different organs, morphology of root, 
stem, leaves, hair, parts of the flower ; reproduction of flowering plants, 
pollination, fertilization and the nature of fruits and seeds. Laboratory 
course in plant physiology, with studies of protoplasm, osmosis, absorption 
of food material; culture fluids, transpiration, digestion, respiration* 
growth, and movement. Common economic fungi (a collection to be 
made) with further study of fungous diseases. 

Mote. — A Museum is a necessary adjunct of the study of Biology. See note (3), 
under Elementary science of the Lower School. 

Special Lower School Cotirses. 

Note. — The following courses are to be taken up only when the staff* 
the equipment, and the accommodations are adequate. 

Principals and School Boards may modify the details to suit the re- 
quirements of their localities, subject to the approval of the Minister of 
Education. See Reg. 39 (3) and (6). 



142 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



I. Commercial Subjects. 
First Course. 

Book-keeping. — Single entry and double entry. Use of journal, day 
book, cash book, bill book and ledger, the first two as books of original en- 
try, and cash books with special columns for merchandise on the debtor side 
and for expenses on the creditor side ; transactions, including discounts and 
renewals of notes and drafts, trade discounts, deposits in banks and the use 
of checks ; changing from single entry to double entry, and from double 
entry to single entry ; sets in simple partnership ; statements of assets and 
liabilities and of profit and loss. 

Business Papers. — Eeceipts, promissory notes, chattel notes, drafts, 
bills, invoices, credit invoices, accounts, monthly statements, financial 
statements, indorsement and acceptance and consequent liability. 

Penmanship. — Correct position and movement ; principles of letter 
formation ; graceful, legible business hand ; ledger headings ; figures ; let- 
ter writing ; addressing envelopes and parcels. 

Typewriting. — Copying documents, transcription of shorthand notes, 
tabular work, manifolding, letter press copying. Touch system recom- 
mended. 

Stenography. — The theory. Dictation and transcription. 

Second Course. 

Book-keeping. — Single entry and double entry, and changing from 
one system to the other. Use of journal day book, invoice book, sales 
book, cash book, bill book and ledger, the first five as books of original en- 
try ; use of journal and cash book with various special columns ; manufac- 
turing, using time sheet and pay roll ; commission business, shipments, 
consignments ; banking, including deposits, withdrawals, discounts, collec- 
tions ; partnership and the sharing of profits and losses by various methods; 
practical treatment of freight, duties, discount, bank and bad debts ac- 
counts ; division of merchandise and expense accounts into various depart- 
ments. Financial statements ; assets and liabilities, profit and loss, trad- 
ing account, income and expenditure, receipts and disbursements, compara- 
tive statements. 

Business and Business Laws. — Forms of the first year, together with 
deposit receipts, warehouse receipts, lien notes, shipping bills, bills of lad- 
ing, proxies, power of attorneys, time sheets, pay rolls, bank pass books, ac- 
count sales. 

Negotiable paper ; discharge, dishonor and protest ; negotiability and 
assignability ; accommodation paper ; statute of limitations ; statute of 
frauds; money; interest; banking organization; business, note issue; part- 
nership ; crossed checks ; collections of accounts ; balance of trade, mean- 
ing and effect on exchange; liability as partners and shareholders; contracts 
— kinds, legality, parties, consideration ; insurance, kinds of policies, duties 
of the insured ; chattel mortgages and mortgages on real estate, definition, 
registration, limitation, assignment, discharge ; searching the title of 
lands. 

Writing. — Course of the first year continued ; acquisition of speed ; 
marking boxes, barrels, etc. 

Stenography. — Course of the first year continued. Speed of 60, 80 
and 100 words per minute ; transcription at the rate of 15 words per min- 
ute should be attained. 



I 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 143 



Typewriting. — Copying documents, transcription of shorthand notes, 
tabular work, manifolding, letter press copying. Touch system recom- 
mended. 

Mote. — The commercial subjects, as outlined above, are intended to cover two 
years' work, with a minimum of a general education. If a good course is taken in 
English, mathematics, and science, with one or more of the languages added, the work 
should extend over three years. 

Special provision may be made for commercial French and German, and 
Geography. 

II. Agriculture. 

Requirements. — 1. Experimental plots; 2. School garden; 3. Arbo- 
retum ; 4. Science laboratory. 

First Course. 

1. The Soil. — Kinds of soil ; heavy and light ; warm and cold, sandy, 
clay, loamy, and humus ; glacial, alluvial, marsh and residual character- 
istics of each, and the way each is formed. Local excursions for the study 
of soils. 

Soil Water. — iTJses of water in the soil ; water capacity of different 
soils ; capillarity and its importance ; percolation of rain water ; conserva- 
tion of soil moisture and methods of conserving moisture ; drainage and im- 
portance of removal of stagnant water. 

Food Materials in the Soil. — How Roots absorb ; osmosis; relation 
of air to soil ; need of air to roots ; experiments in laboratory and in the 
plots. 

2. The Plant. — The parts of the plant and their relations to the soil; 
light, and air; functions of the root, stem and leaf ; germination of seeds 
of the common garden and farm plants, and the growth of the seedlings, 
propagation of plants by seeds, budding and grafting ; fruits and seeds ; 
weeds and weed-seeds. 

How plants feed ; air and soil food materials ; photosynthesis ; stor- 
age of plant food in various farm plants ; annuals, biennials, and peren- 
nials of the farm. 

The making and keeping of a garden ; selection of seed and planting 
in experimental plots. 

Second Course. 

1. The Soil. — The First Course continued ; Analysis of soils ; the 
peculiar soil-properties which affect plant growth. Texture, coarse, open, 
loose, fine, hard, compact, stiff, mellow, porous, lumpy, rententive, leachy, 
etc. Tillage, different methods for different soils and climate ; improve- 
ment of soils. Plant food in the soil ; rotation of crops and the food re- 
quirements of each crop ; systems of rotation ; underdrainage ; bacteria in 
the soil. 

2. The Plant. — The First Course continued. The botany of the 
crops of the farm ; the uses of the different crops ; how harvested ; how 
planted ; good and poor seed and importance of selection of good seed ; 
grasses and forage crops, their value and identification ; vegetable crops ; 
plant diseases. Forestry on the farm, and the common trees and shrubs; 
leguminous crops and their special value. , 

3. The Animal. — Resemblances and differences between plants and 
animals ; physiology of animals; feeding and digestion ; rations; breeds ; 
poultry ; excursions to stock farms in vicinity ; care of animals, ventilation 
of stables : bacterial diseases. 



114 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



III. Manual Training. 

No detailed course of study is prescribed. The following prescription 
of the character of the work should, however, be followed : — 

1. Models. — In drawing up a set of models, exercises, or projects for 
any school, attention should be given to the following points : — 

(1) The course should be suitable to the district and should have spe- 
cial reference to its occupations and industries. 

(2) The models should be graduated in order of the difficulty of the 
tool operations necessary for their completion. 

(3) Due provision should be made to allow of the expression of the 
individual thought of the student. 

(4) The work should have a close and intimate relation to the general 
"work of the school. 

(5) When formulated, the course should not be regarded as fixed and 
final; but, from time to time, such changes should be made as greater ex- 
perience and knowledge may render advisable. 

(6) Each exercise should be capable of being performed wholly by the 
student, and the teacher should never apply a cutting tool to the model on 
which the boy is actually at work. 

(7) The form and proportion of each model should be carefully stud- 
ied, attention being paid to grace and beauty as well as utility. 

(8) The course should be based upon exercises and not upon models. 
This will lead to variety, and the pupil may make any model he chooses pro- 
vided it contain the exercises the teacher wishes him to learn. 

2. Working Drawings.— Particular attention should be paid to the 
preparation of working drawings by the pupil. These should be either 
full size or on a fairly large scale. Orthographic projections and isomet- 
xic views should be used, and an exercise should not be commenced unless 
a fully dimensioned drawing has been made or is being made concurrently 
ivith the bench work. Correctly dimensioned drawings of various objects, 
of which the students themselves should take the measurements ; freehand 
dimension sketches, to be afterwards transferred into working drawings, 
afford useful practice. Freehand sketching should also be used in making 
drawings of leaves, tree sections, tools, etc., and in completing curved por- 
tions of working drawings. In the more advanced classes, tracings and 
blue prints should be made. 

A course in mechanical drawing should not be entirely restricted to the 
shop work exercises, as their natural order and sequence will not provide 
sufficient variety for the range of work necessary to give a graso of the sub- 
ject and its application to industial pursuits. Practice should be given in 
the reading of drawings until they can be interpreted with accuracy and fa- 
cility. Work in drawing must be done from the object. Great attention 
should be paid to lettering: and dimensioning. The cultivation of the art 
of sketching an idea rapidlv, to be afterwards worked out, will prove of im- 
mense benefit. Each pupil should use a note book; and the use, care, and 
adjustment of the various instruments should be carefully taught. 

3. Materials. — Clear ideas should be acquired respecting the mater- 
ials Aised, e. g. : — The growth, structure and uses of different varieties of 
timber ; its felling, seasoning, and conversion ; warping, twisting, and 
checking, how caused and how counteracted ; the nature and uses of the 
common iron ores ; important iron and steel processes, etc. Various meth- 
ods of finishing should be shown. 

4. Work in Wood and Metal. — The practical work in wood or metal 
should consist of a series of models or exercises carefully graduated so as to 






1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 145 



teach the fundamental processes employed in working from the rough ma- 
terial to the finished product. The proper use of nails and screws should 
be explained and practised, and the various methods of jointing used in 
constructive work. Models need not be confined to one material ; combi- 
nations of wood and metal even in the same model often afford useful exer- 
cises. While the expression of the individual thought of the pupil may 
show itself in the formation of useful articles, it is not intended that the 
Manual Training room be turned into a workshop for the manufacture of 
school apparatus. 

5. Construction and Use of Tools. — The construction and mode of 
use of the tools employed should be shown," and demonstrations illustrat- 
ing the proper methods of sharpening and keeping them in good order 
should be given systematically throughout the course. Pupils should 
themselves be required to sharpen the edged tools they use, and the proper 
method of correcting errors in tools of precision such as winding strips, 
square, face-plate, and the turning of an oil or grindstone, etc, should also 
be shown and practised. 

6. Lathe Work. — Schools that possess lathes may alternate this work 
with ordinary bench work, and the products of the lathe should be used in 
the building up of articles made at the bench. A correct understanding 
of the accompanying tools, the shape they should take, and the condition 
they should be in for accomplishing the best work should be given. The 
models should be designed with a view to acquainting the pupils with the 
methods of turning and finishing both hard and soft woods and metals, and 
the principles involved in face-plate turning and turning between centres. 
The use of the various lathe attachments and change wheels should be 
shown, and the different velocities necessary for various purposes clearly ex- 
plained. 

T. Metal Working. — Metal may be worked either hot or cold. Cold 
metal may take the form of bent iron work, and this may be graduated to 
suit the physical capacity of the pupils. In its more elementary forms 
the equipment necessary is simple and inexpensive, and the work may be 
made a valuable adjunct to the art teaching given in the school. The 
course in metal work should give a general knowledge of the working of 
iron and steel and of the possibilities and limitations of metal working. 
Work in hot metal demands more extensive equipment. In forging, the 
preparation of the fire is most important and instruction should be given 
.as to its building and keeping up. The most important tool in all forge 
work is the hammer and much attention should be paid to it. The funda- 
mental operations in forging are few in number and may be taken up in the 
iollowing order : — Drawing, bending, twisting, shouldering, upsetting, 
punching, weldinjg, shaping, brazing, and, for decorative work, veining 
and modelling. Exercises in cold metal may be taken as follows : — Simple 
filing, soldering, chipping and filing, rivetting, scraping, and fitting. 
Various small tools can be forged and properly tempered for use in the 
lstfhe. 

8. Decoration. — As a general rule decoration should be applied only 
:to models that are soundly constructed. Various methods of preparing 

stains and their use for different purposes should be dealt with. Indent- 
ing and stamping, groove carving, chip carving, flat carving, low relief and 
high relief may be employed according to the capacity of the pupil and the 
requirements of the object to be decorated. All schemes of decoration 
should first be sketched on paper or worked in clay. To stimulate origi- 
nality, the unit may be given and the student encouraged to make new 
combinations, the copying of designs being as far as possible prevented. 



146 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



9. System of Measurement. — Either system of measurement may 
be used, English or Metric ; but as, in all scientific work, the latter is com- 
ing into general use, it is advisable in the higher classes, at any rate, at 
least , to combine the systems. 

Note 1. — In those cases where the pupil has not taken a course of constructive 
work in the Public School, the work will of necessity be of a simpler character than 
much of that suggested in the above scheme. Where possible a separate class should be 
formed of such pupils. 

.Note 2. — The graduates of each year should unite in constructing some piece of 
work to be left in the school as a memorial of the class. 

IV. Household Science. 

First Year. 

Hygiene, Sanitation, and Cookery. — Personal hygiene, care of skin, 
clothing, physical habits, etc. ; hygiene of the house, ventilation, location, 
sanitary surroundings. 

Kitchen and its equipments, stoves, etc. : bed-room, bath-room, 
closets, etc. ; household pests ; disposal of waste. Food : its functions, 
classification, special value of each. Cooking : principles involved in the 
different methods employed, and application of these to different kinds of 
food. 

Continuation of public school course Form IV. in cookery ; prepara- 
tion of meals, cost, time for preparation, planning and serving a meal with- 
in a given cost. 

Needlework. — All kinds of hand sewing, including buttonholes, 
patching and darning. Talks on implements used. Study of fabrics. 
Growth of cotton and flax. Cultivation of silk worm and processes of manu- 
facture. Demonstration of primitive methods of weaving. Basting and 
running stitches, back stitch, half-back stitch, combination stitch, over- 
casting, overhanding on folded selvedge edges, true bias, matching stripes, 
plain hemming, French hemming, joining bias strips, straightway fell on 
flannel, herring bone stitch, gussets, gathers and stitched band, hemmed 
band, chain and feather stitch, hem stitch, loop stitch, blind loops, button- 
hole stitch, sewing on buttons, tapes, hemmed patch, overhand patch, flan- 
nel patch, slip stitch, stockinet darning, cashmere darning, mending from 
home and application of these stitches in making button bags, shoe bags, 
shoe holders, and in hemming towels, aprons, dressing doll. 

Basket and Raffia Work. — Source, kinds and use of wicker and raffia. 
Making of table mats, napkin rings, doll's hats, work baskets, porch mats, 
furniture beaters, etc. 

Second Course. 

Hygiene, Sanitation and Cookery. — Eeview and elaboration of 
principles taught in the first year. Dietetics : preparation of food for 
invalids, diet for children, for infants, balanced rations. The house : fur- 
nishing with consideration of cost, comfort and good taste. Public hyg- 
iene ; responsibility of the individual in prevention of disease. Home nurs- 
ing and emergencies : furnishing and care of the sick room, making a 
bed, changing bed linen, bathing and care of a patient ; ventilation of 
sickroom ; treatment of burns, scalds, wounds, fainting, frost-bite, etc. ; 
bandaging ; administration of food and medicine ; ferments ; yeasts, mold, 
bacteria, etc. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 147 



Laboratory Work. — Food combinations, advanced cookery ; serving 
and decoration of food ; care of silver, brass, copper, nickel, marble, hard- 
wood. Duties of the hostess in the entertainment of guests. Ethics of 
the home. Homemaking versus housekeeping, the home as a community. 
Relation of the home to the state. Influence of a well ordered home. 

Needle Work. — Talks on materials suitable for underwear. Em- 
broideries, laces, and other trimmings. Instruction in the use of patterns. 
Cutting, fitting, and making corset co'ver with French fell. Taking mea- 
surements and drafting pattern for drawers. Cutting out drawers. Mak- 
ing tucks and preparing the trimming. Putting tucks and insertion to- 
gether. Gathering, stroking and putting on ruffles. Making French 
seams and placing placket gusset. Putting on yoke or band. Making 
button holes. Drafting pattern for skirt. Taking measurements, cutting, 
fitting and making night gown. 

Threading, running, oiling, and cleaning of sewing machines. Use 
of attachments,. 

Application of sewing stitches in outlining, and Kensington stitch on 
doily or tray cover. Embroidering initials. Hemstitching. Fringing 
doily. 

Note. — The course in Household Science is a two years' one; but, when the condi- 
tions render it desirable, it may be extended over a longer period. 

Special Middle School Courses. 

Note — The following courses are to be taken up only when the staff, 
the equipment, and the accommodations are adequate. See Reg. 39 (3) : 

I. Arithmetic and English Grammar. 

The follwoing courses in Arithmetic and English Grammar are pres- 
cribed for candidates for Junior non-professional Public School certificates, 
in addition to the ordinary Lower School courses in these subjects : — 

Arithmetic. — More extended and intensive study of the theory. Con- 
tinuation of the work in commercial arithmetic, with annuities and equa- . 
tion of payments. Review of work in mensuration, with the pyramid, the 
cone, and the sphere ; the derivation of the formulae. Logarithmic compu- 
tation. 

English Grammar. — More extended and intensive study of the course 
of the Lower School. 

II. Art Subjects. 

Principals and School Boards may modify the details of the following 
course in Art, to suit the requirements of their localities. See Reg. 39 
(3) and (6) : — 

Advanced drawing from flowers, drapery, and natural objects, in black 
and white and in water color. Pen and ink drawing for illustating pur- 
poses . Ornamental drawing on blackboard. Out-door sketching from 
nature in pencil, charcoal, and water colors. History of art.^ 

Charcoal drawing and painting ornamental casts and antique statues. 
Modelling in clay. Ornamental design. Elementary practical geometry 
as far as necessary for geometric designs. Drawing conventional flowers, 
leaves, rosettes, etc., based on natural forms. ^ Designs for floor cloths, 
wall-paper, wood and iron work. Tinting designs in water colors. The 
principles of design and anatomy of pattern. 

13e 



148 THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Practical geometry. _ Projection of points, lines, and solids. Paral- 
lel and angular perspective. 

Machine drawing. Use of instruments. Drawing details, bolts, 

nuts, screws, gear wheels. 

Architecture. Elementary architectural design and decoration, plans 
elevations, sections. Perspective architectural drawing in pen and ink and 
water colors. The different styles of architecture. - 

Note— The Art subjects may be continued, if desired, in the Upper School 



APPENDIX A. 

Geography. 

Following are the details of the course in Geography prescribed for 
the Fifth Form and the Continuation classes of the Public Schools and for 
the Lower School of the High Schools : 

Soil, stones, rocks, strata and their origin ; nebular theory : stratified, 
unstratified, metamorphic rocks ; elevation and depression of the crust of 
the earth, forming continents and oceans ; periods in the earth's history 
in relation to Canada and to Ontario in particular ; life on the earth, fos- 
sils. Forms and distribution of land masses, causes, theories regarding 
them ; changes in land forms ; agents of change, volcanoes, water, etc. 
Study of the common rocks, minerals and soils of the districts. Mountains, 
origin, growth, distribution, relation to mines, forests, and climate ; vol- 
canoes and volcanic phenomena ; plains and plateaus — Canada generally, 
Ontario and the Northwest in particular ; relation of Canadian upheavals, 
subsidences, glaciation, moraines, gravel ridges, boulders and formations, 
to the continental areas of which they form a part. 

Rivers and river valleys; lakes ; coast features ; industrial importance 
of streams, rivers, lakes ; origin and growth of rivers, falls, and rapids, 
changes in courses with causes ; old river courses, depression and elevation ; 
erosion by rivers, transportation and deposition of sediment. 

The ocean : Origin, distribution, depth, movements, currents, tides, 
waves, ocean bed, etc. 

The atmosphere, composition, importance to life, aqueous vapor; heat- 
ing of the earth ; depth of atmosphere ; high and low pressure, the baro- 
meter, isobars, etc., movements of the air; winds, their causes, trade 
winds, anti-trade winds, periodic, variable, cyclones, anti-cyclones, thunder 
storms, tornadoes ; clouds, rain, snow, dew, evaporation ; climate, causes 
affecting it ; former climatic conditions. 

Life : Yar : eties,, dependence upon climate, soil, etc. Plant life ; 
typical forms in different zones, distribution; marine plants, animal life; 
typical forms, terrestrial, aerial, marine ; direct or ultimate dependence on 
plant life ; distribution of forms. Man : Varieties, distribution, relation 
to other animal life and to natural and physical conditions. 

The earth as a planet ; the planets ; the fixed stars ; the celestial 
sphere ; observations of some of the more prominent constellations ; the 
solar system and its members ; the earth, its size and shape, proofs of shape ; 
circles on surface ; latitude and longitude ; zones ; daily rotation on axis ; 
proofs ; day and night ; yearly revolution ; its orbit an ellipse ; perihelion, 
aohelion : seasons ; variation in length of day and night, measurement of 
time; unit of time; sun-dial; civil year; standard railway time of Can- 
ada and the United States ; location of position by latitude and longitude ; 
calculation of times and distances. 

13a E 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 149 



The moon : rotations ; phases ; different kinds of months ; various 
eclipses of the sun and moon ; umbra ; penumbra, appearance through a 
telescope ; absence of atmosphere, clouds, etc. 

The sun : sun spots, solar heat, radiation, etc. Comets, meteors, ne- 
bulae, etc., their probable nature, number, revolutions, etc.; darkness and 
coldness of space. 

Important commercial highways and their relations to centres of 
population. Natural and manufactured products of the countries of the 
world, with their exports and imports. Internal commercial highways of 
Canada and the chief internal commercial highways of the United States. 
Relation between industrial and commercial centres and physical features ; 
relation of soil and underlying rock formations to the products of the dis- 
trict, and the occupations of the inhabitants. Water ways : their influence 
on population and settlement, their use as highways of commerce, with 
special reference to Canadian routes. Typical natural products of different 
zones. Commercial relations of Great Britain and her colonies, and of 
Canada and the United States. Forms of Government in the countries of 
the world and their relation to civilization. Relation between the charac- 
teristics of a people and their environment. 



APPENDIX B. 

Elementary Science. 

Following are the details of the courses in Elementary Science. The 
lirst courses in Botany, Zoology, and Physics are prescribed for the Fifth 
Form of the Public Schools. Both the first and the second courses in Bot- 
any, Zoology, and Physics, and the course in Chemistry are prescribed for 
the Continuation Classes of the Public Schools and for the Lower Schools 
of the High Schools. 

Botany. 

First Course — September to November. 

The structure and functions of flower, leaf, stem, root, etc. ; organs of 
the flower, their functions, pollination, fertilization. Uses of hairs, spines, 
prickles, tendrils, and petioles. The simpler fruits and the means of dis- 
persion of seeds. Formation of tree buds ; preparation for winter; annu- 
als, biennials, perennials. The fall of fruits and leaves of deciduous and 
evergreen trees. The study and interpretation of the marks on trees and 
shrubs. Comparison of higher plants with higher animals ; relation of 
each to food ; means of obtaining and storing it ; dependence of animals on 
plants. 

April to June. 

Relation of plants to light, moisture and heat ; water as a solvent, cir- 
culation in plants, experiments; soluble and insoluble material in soils ; 
importance of each class of material to the plant ; uses of roots and leaves 
m absorbing food from soil and air, experiments. Struggle for light and 
moisture, germination of the seed, development of the parts ; examples — 
bean, morning-glory, pumpkin, corn, wheat. The expanding of buds and 
the opening of the spring flowers. Objects of pruning trees, transplant- 
ing and thinning vegetables. Times of germination and flowering of com- 



150 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



mon plants in their native situations. Propagation of offsets, runners, tu- 
bers, slips, seeds, grafts, budding. Conditions governing the growth of 
the early wild flowers. Modifications in plant growth suitable to environ- 
ment. Plant societies in different localities. Identification of plants 
with regular flowers. 

Second Course — September to November. 

Morphology of the composites and grasses. Identification of the sim- 
pler ones. 

Plant societies continued ; peculiarities of each which adapt it to its 
situation. Special study of weeds, means of controllng them. Morpho- 
logy and habits of some typical ferns, as bracken fern, shield fern, moon- 
wort, sensitive fern. Morphology and habits of a mushroom, a polypore, a 
boletus, a puff-ball. Parasitism and saprophytism. Study of plant ene- 
mies and remedial treatment — the simpler forms. Comparison of spring 
and autumn flowers. Comparative study of fruits. Special study of leaf, 
its modifications and adjustments for securing a favorable light position ; 
its importance in obtaining and elaborating food material ; the part ; t 
plays in evaporation. 

April to June. 

Common orchard and forest trees. Special study of the con 1# ferae ; the 
bud ; form, permanence and phyllotaxy of leaves, flowers ; comparison of 
twigs and wood with those of other trees. Comparative study of pith and 
cortical layers. Distinction between endogen and exogen. Meaning, sig- 
nificance, and methods of cross fertilization. Man's influence on plants. 
Plant physiology, elementary and experimental ; chlorophyll ; movements 
of gaseous and liquid nutriments and waste products. Morphology of 
complex inflorescences. Study of the fungi continued. Economic uses of 
plants, food, clothing, ornament, medicine, rubber, tea, spices, etc. Gen- 
eral view and comparison of the characteristics of the larger classes of 
plants taken up in the course. 

Zoology. 

First Course — September to November. 

Relations of insects to flowers. Study of grasshopper, potato- beetle, 
tomato-worm, house-fly, spider, centipede. The life history of at least 

two insects having complete metamorphoses. Collection of caterpillars in- 
festing common plants, for observation of their metamorphoses. Recog- 
nition of some of our common birds ; the relation to their habits of the 
structure of bills, legs, feet, wings, and nests, the arrangement of toes, and 
the color of feathers and eggs (aquatic, terrestrial, aerial); times of their 
migrations. 

April to June. 

The life history of the frog. Continuation of the study of the birds ; 
especially in regard to their methods of obtainng food and nesting. Life 
history and habits of any common economic insects such as the tent-cater- 
pillar, the cabbage-butterfly, the lady-bird, or other predacious beetle. 
Familiarity with the names and general appearance of the common fishes, 
frogs, newts, lizards, turtles, and snakes of the locality. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



151 



Second Course— September to November. 

theip T ^SS a f^n^ ^f a l eristics V Our native Canadian mammals, 
tneir aaaptation to our climate, their coloration dnn'liHr ^ai^ -p 1 """"> 

mies. Modifications for aerial life (bal ^f fly'ng-sqSel) arborea?' Kfe 

^qmrrel), subterranean (wood-cfiuck; m oie)/aquatTc (btver mu krat) 

5 ih7ZT\^ Car ^ VO l° U ^ a ? imals ' Peculiarities of eack ' AdSSm 

April to June. 
The food supply of birds and insects ; those beneficial or im'nrim™ 

of n'twn nf £ Til tWGen bltln ? and ™>W ^sects. Life-history 

of any two of the following : carpet-beetle, scale insects, saw-fly, codling- 
moth mosquito, pea-weevil ; rearing the insects to study their me amorpho- 
Bi8 ; observation of conspicuous orchard or garden pests of the season with 
protective treatment of plants. Economic "uses of Animal products ' li Ik 
wood, fur, leather, etc. General view and comparison of the Wer class- 
es of animals taken up m the course. ° 

Physics. . 

First Course. — November to April. 

l^/T 18 °J matter | *°} ids > li W id *> ^ses; different states of the same 
Jnnd o± matter ; crystalline and amorphous conditions ; theory of con- 
stitution of matter. Physical and chemical change. Simple and com- 

w°p^ + nC f' - + MetriG Units and standard s of length, area, volume, 

weights, mass density ; experiments m measurements with use of instru- 
ments, such as rule, balance, burette, caliper. Properties of solids Pro- 
perties of liquids ; transmission of pressure by liquids ; illustrations, con- 
struction and uses of hydraulic press. Eelation of pressure to depth and 
density ,, pressure at a point equal in all directions ; buoyancy and flota- 
tion. Properties of gases, weight, elasticity, atmospheric pressure, baro- 
meter ; expansive force of gas, with applications, as air cushion, bicycle 
tire, football, compressed air motor, air gun, etc. ; relation between the vol- 
ume and the pressure of a gas (Boyle's law). Construction and use of air 
pump, common pump, free pump, condenser, (as bicycle pump); buoyant 
force of gases. Solution, diffusion ; part played by these processes in na- 
ture bpecinc gravity ; common methods of finding specific gravities of 
solids, liquids, and gases. 

Second Course. — November to April. 

Experiments illustrating the transformation of other forms of energy 
into heat ; experiments to illustrate the expansion of solids, liquids, and 
gases by heat ; distinction between temperature and heat. Methods of 

measuring the change of temperature, with description of Centigrade and 
Fahrenheit thermometers ; change of state, phenomena of fusion, ebulli- 
tion, evaporation, liquefaction and solidification ; latent heat ; methods of 
transference of heat ; conduction, practical methods of heat insulation 



152 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



principle of Davy's safety lamp, convection currents ; methods of heating 
and ventilating nouses. 

Lode-stone, magnetic attraction; magnetization and demagnetization ; 
polarity ; magnetic induction; earth's inductive influence; construction and 
practical use of the mariner's compass and dipping needle ; geographical 
and magnetic poles ; construction of simple voltaic cells ; chemical effects 
of the electric current, decomposition of water by electricity ; magnetizing 
effects of the electric current ; the construction of an electro-magnet, with 
some of its more common practical applications, as electric bell, telegraph, 
and telephone ; heating and lighting effects of the current, arc and incan- 
descent lamps. 

Nature and propagation of sound ; principles of construction of some of 
the more common musical instruments, as piano, violin,, harp, horn, and 
organ ; reflection of sound, echoes ; and musical tones ; pitch and quality. 

Nature and propagation of light, simple experiments illustrating the 
reflection and retraction of light ; the prism, the dispersion of light, color. 

Chemistry. 

Oxygen : Preparation, properties ; oxidation, examples ; combustion; 
reduction ; dependence of organic world on oxygen. Water : decompo- 
sition by electricity, common impurities, tests. Hydrogen : preparation 
and properties. Ammonia : preparation, properties, economic uses. 
Carbon ; forms, occurrence, properties, and uses ; carbon dioxide, prepar- 
ation by combustion in air, occurrence in the atmosphere, preparation from 
limestone, properties, comparison with air relation to plant and animal life, 
tests ; carbonic acid. Limestone ; forms;, occurrence ; lime and its manu- 
facture ; action of water on quick lime ; action of acids on limestone ; other 
carbonates; mortar; building stone, animal shells/uses of limestones and its 
products. Air ; separation of oxygen from nitrogen ; properties of the 
latter. Acids, basis, salts, distinguishing characteristics. 



APPENDIX C. 

I. Geometry. — Loiver and Middle Schools. 

i 
Following are the details of the course in Euclid prescribed for the 
Lower and Middle Schools of the High Schools. The first thirteen of the 
constructions and the first nineteen of the theorems are prescribed for can- 
didates for District teachers' non-professional certificates, in addition to 
the Practical' Geometry of the Lower School. 

A. — Constructions. 

To construct a triangle with sides of given lengths. 
To construct an angle equal to a given rectilineal angle. 
To bisect a given angle. 
To bisect a given straight line. 

To draw a line perpendicular to a given line from a given point in it. 
To draw a line perpendicular to a given line from a given point not in 
the line. 

Locus of a point equidistant from two given lines. 
Locus of a point equidistant from two given points. 



1904 'EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 153 



To draw a line parallel to another, through a given point. 

To divide a given line into any number of equal parts. 

To describe a parallelogram equal to a given triangle, and having an 
angle equal to a given angle. 

To describe a parallelogram equal to a given rectilineal figure, and 
having an angle equal to a given angle. 

On a given straight line to describe a parallelogram equal to a given 
triangle, and having an angle equal to a given angle. 

To find the centre of a given circle. 

From a given point to draw a tangent to a given circle. 

On a given straight line to construct a segment of a circle containing an 
angle equal to a given angle. 

From a given circle to cut off a segment containing an angle equal to a 
given angle. 

In a circle to inscribe a triangle equiangular to a given triangle. 

To find locus of centres of circles touching two given lines. 

To inscribe a circle in a given triangle. 

To describe a circle touching three given straight lines. 

To describe a circle about a given triangle. 

About a given circle to describe a triangle equiangular to a given tri- 
angle. 

To divide a given line similarly to another given divided line. 

To find the fourth proportional to three given lines. 

To describe a polygon similar to a given polygon, and with the corres- 
ponding sides in a given ratio. 

To find the mean proportional between two given straight lines. 

To construct a polygon similar to a given polygon, and such that their 
areas are in a given ratio. 

To describe a polygon of given shape and size. 

B. — Theorems. 

The sum of the angles of any triangle is equal to two right angles. 

The angles at the base of an isosceles triangle are equal, with converse. 

If the three sides of one triangle be equal, respectively, to the three sides 
of another, the triangles are equal in all respects. 

If two sides and the included angle of one triangle be equal to two sides 
and the included angle of another triangle, the triangles are equal in all 
respects. * 

If two angles and one side of triangle be equal to two angles and the 
corresponding side of another, the triangles are equal in all respects. 

If two sides and an angle opposite one of these sides be equal, respective- 
ly, in two triangles, the angles opposite the other pair of equal sides are 
either equal or supplemental. 

The sum of the exterior angles of a polygon is four right angles. 

The greater side of any triangle has the greater angle opposite it. 

The greater angle of any triangle has the greater side opposite it. 

If two sides of one triangle be equal respectively to two sides of another, 
that with the greater contained angle has the greater base, with converse. 

If a transversal fall on two parallel lines, relations between angles form- 
ed, with converse. 

Lines which join equal and parallel lines towards the same parts are 
themselves equal and parallel. 

The opposite sides and angles of a parallelogram are equal and the diag- 
onal bisects it. 



154 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Parallelograms on the same base, or on equal bases, and between the 
same parallels, are equal. 

Triangles on the same base, or on equal bases,* and between the same 
parallels, are equal. 

Triangles equal in area, and on the same base, are between the same 
parallels. 

If a parallelogram and a triangle be on the same base, and between the 
same parallels, the parallelogram is double the triangle. 

Expressions for area of a parallelogram, and area of a triangle. 

The compliments of the parallelograms about the diagonal of any paral- 
lelogram are equal. 

The square on the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle is equal to the 
sum of the squares on the sides. 

If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the sum of the squares 
on the parts, together with twice the rectangle contained by the parts, is equal 
to the square on the whole line. 

The square on a side of any triangle is equal to the sum of the squares 
on the two other sides — twice the rectangle contained by either of these 
sides and the projection of the other side on it. » 

If more than two equal straight lines can be drawn from the circum- 
ference of a circle to a point within it, that point is the centre. 

The diameter is the greatest chord in a circle, and a chord nearer the 
centre is greater than one more remote. Also the greater chord is nearer 
the centre than the less. 

The angle at the centre of a circle is double the angle at the circumfer- 
ence on the same arc. 

The angles in the same segment of a circle are equal, with converse. 

The opposite angles of a quadrilateral inscribed in a circle are together 
equal to two right angles, with converse. 

The angle in a semicircle is a right angle; in a segment greater than a 
semicircle less than a right angle ; in a segment less than a semicircle greater 
than a right angle. 

A tangent is perpendicular to the radius to the point of contact ; only one 
tangent can be drawn at a given point , the perpendicular to the tangent at the 
point of contact passes through the centre ; the perpendicular from centre on 
tangent passes through the point of contact. 

If two circles touch, the line joining the centres passes through the point 
of contact. 

The angles which a chord drawn from the point of contact makes with 
the tangent, are equal to the angles in the alternate segments. 

The rectangles under the segments of intersecting chords are equal. 

If OA.OB— OC 2 , OC is a tangent to the circle through A, B and C. 

Triangles of the altitude are as their bases. 

A line parallel to the base of a triangle divides the sides proportionally, 
with the converse. 

If the verticle angle of a triangle be bisected, the bisector divides the 
base into segments that are as the sides, with converse. 

The analogous proposition when the exterior angle at the vertex is bisect- 
ed, with converse. 

If two triangles are equiangular, the sides are proportional. 

If the sides of two triangles are proportional, the triangles are equiangu- 
lar. 

If the sides of two triangles about equal angles are proportional, the trian- 
gles are equiangular. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 155 



If two triangles have an angle in each equal, and the sides about two 
other triangles proportional, the remaining angles are equal or supple- 
mental. 

Similar triangles are as the squares on corresponding sides. 

The perpendicular from a right angle of a right-angled triangle on the 
hypotenuse divides the triangle into two which are similar to the original 
triangle. 

In equal circles, angles, whether at the. centres or circumferences, are 
proportional to the arcs on which they stand. 

The areas of two similar polygons are as the squares on corresponding 
sides. 

If three lines be proportional, the first is to the third as the figure on the 
first to the similar figure on the second. 

Questions and/ easy deductions on; the precieding constructions and 
theorems. 

jSote. — In the formal deductive Geometry modifications of Euclid's treatment of 
the subject will be allowed, though not required, as follows : — 

The employment of the "hypothetical construction." 

The free employment of the method of superposition, including the rotation of 
figures about an axis, or about a point in a plane. 

A modification of Euclid's parallel postulate. 

A treatment of ratio and proportion restricted to the case in which the compared 
magnitudes are commensurable. 

II. Geometry — Upper School. 

Following are the details of the course in Geometry prescribed for the 
Upper School of the High Schools : 

A. 

Exercises on - the course prescribed for the Middle School, with special 
reference to the following topics— Loci ; Maxima and Minima ; The System of 
Inscribed, Escribed and Circumscribed Circles of a Triangle with metrical 
relations; Radical Axis. 

B. — Synthetic Geometry. 

The following additional propositions in Synthetic Geometry, with ex- 
ercises thereon : — 

To divide a given straight line internally and externally in medial sec- 
tion. 

To describe a square that shall be equal to a given rectilinear figure. 

To describe an isosceles triangle having each of the angles at the base 
double of the third angle. 

To inscribe a regular pentagon in a given circle. 

The squares on two sides of a triangle are together equal to twice the 
square on half the third side and twice the square on the median to that side. 

If A B C be a triangle, and A be joined to a point P of the base such 
that B P : P C=m : n. thf n n A B 2 -f *r\ \ l l2 =(m^ n) A P'-f n B P 2 J-m P G z 

In a right-angled triangle the rectilineal figure described on the hypo- 
tenuse is equal to the sum of the similar and similarly described figures on 
the two other sides. 

If the vertical angle of a triangle be bisected by a straight line which 
also cuts the base, the rectangle contained by the sides of the triangle is equal 



156 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



to the rectangle contained by the segments of the base, together with the 
square on the straight line which bisects the angle. 

If from the vertical angle of a triangle a straight line be drawn perpen- 
dicular to the base, the rectangle contained by the sides of the triangle is 
equal to the rectangle contained by the perpendicular and the diameter of 
the circle described about the triangle. 

The rectangle contained by the diagonals of a quadrilateral inscribed in 
a circle is equal to the sum of the two rectangles contained by its opposite 
sides. 

Two similar polygons may be so placed that the lines joining corres- 
ponding points are concurrent. 

If a straight line meet the sides B C, C A, A B, of a triangle A B C in 
D, E, F respectively, then B D. C E. A F-"D C. E A. F B, and conversely. 
(Menelaus' Theorem.) 

If straight lines through the angular points A, B, C of a triangle are 
concurrent, and intersect the opposite sides in D, E, F respectively, then, 
B D. C E. A F=D C E A. F B. and conversely. (Ceva's Theorem.) 

If a point A lie on the polar of a point B with respect to a circle, then B 
lies on polar of A. 

Any straight lines which passes through a fixed point is cut harmonically 
by the point, any circle, and the polar of the point with respect to the circle. 

In a complete quadrilateral each diagonal is divided harmonically by the 
other two diagonals, and the angular points through which it passes. 

C. — Elementary Analytical Geometry. 

Axes of co-ordinates. Position of a point in plane of reference. 
Transformation of co-ordinates, — origin changed, or axes (rectangular) 
turned through a given angle. 

±SA=x 1 (y^y^+. ... + .... 

Co-ordinates of point dividing line joining P x (x-i, yi,) and P 2 (x 2 , y t ) in 
ratio m : n are 

m aL 4- nx, my 4- ny\ 

x= — ^ — >y=—^-, — -• 

m-\-n m-\-n 

Equations of straight lines. 

x — x 1 y — yA 



-x 2 y 1 —y, 
a b 



x — ay — b 



cos V sin v 
y=mx-\-b. 
y=m (x — a), 
x cos a+?/ sin a— p. 



!. Line defined by two points 
through which it passes. 



Line defined by one point 
through which it passes, 
and by its direction. 



1904 'EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 157 

General equation of 1st degree, Ax-^B y-\-C=o, represents a straight line. 
Any line through (x h y y ) is 

A (x—xJ+B (y—y,)=-o. 
If be angle between A x-\-By J r C=o and A' x+B' y-\-C'=o, then 

a A A'+B B' 

cos 8= — ===== - 

Condition of | rity, A A'-\-B B'=o. 

Condition of || ism, -—=— . 
A B 

Distance from (a, b) to A x-\-By-\- C=o, in direction whose direction co- 
sines are (I, m) is 

Aa+Bb+C 

Al+Bm 

| r distance from (a, b) on A x-\-By J r C^=o 

Aa+Bb+C 

^A^+B 2 
The Circle — 

Equations in forms : 

x 2J ry 2 =r 2 . 

(x—aff(y—bj 2 =r\ 
y 2 =2rx — x' 2 . 

General equation x 2 -\-y 2 -\- 2 A x-\-2 B y J r G=o, 

or +Af+(y-\-By=A 2 +B 2 — 0, 
represents a circle with centre ( — A, — B) and radius. 

V 7 ~A 2 -\-B 2 — C 
Tangent at (x\ y') to x 2 -\- y 2 =r 2 , is x x -j- y y ' = v. 

Normal is — r=-^r 

x y. 

Tangent in form. 



y = mx zt r \/ I -f w 2 . 
Pole being (x\ y), polar is x x -j- y y = r 2 . 
If pole move along a line, polar turns about pole of that line 
Length of tangent from 

(x, y) to x 2 -\- 2/ 2 4- 2 J. x-j- 2 B ?/ -j- — o 
is ^' 2 + ;y' 2 +2Ax'+2B // + (7. 
Radical axis of 

^+2/ 2 +2 il' *+ 2 fry+C^o 
Easy exercises on the preceding propositions. 

APPENDIX D. 

Following are the details of the courses in Mediaeval and Modern History 
prescribed for the Upper School of the High Schools : 



158 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Medieval History. 

1. The Triumph of Christianity over Paganism. 

2. The Weakness of the Roman Empire; the Teutonic invasions; the 
fall of the Western division of the Empire. 

3. The Revival of the Roman Empire in the Age of Justianian. 

4. The Rise of Islam; the extent and permanence of its conquests. 

5. The New Teutonic States in Europe; the Franks in Gaul; the Eng- 
lish in Britain. 

6. The Teutonic Power as seen in the Holy Roman Empire founded by 
Charlemagne. 

7. The coming of the Northmen ; tho Danes in England ; the Normals 
in France ; the Norman conquest of England. 

8. Phases of Mediaeval Life: (1) the Papacy; (2) Monasticism; the 
Friars. (3) Feudalism; (4) Chivalry; (5) the Crusading movement. 

9. The struggle between the Papacy and the Empire; its results. 

10. The beginning of National Life in Europe as seen in a sketch of the 
History of (1) France and (2) England. 

11. The Social Life of the Middle Ages : (1) the Condition of the Peo- 
ple; (2) Life in the Towns; (3) Education; the rise of the Universities. 

12. The end of the Mediaeval Period : (1) the Revival of Learning : (2) 
the Menace from the Ottoman Power : the Fall of Constantinople ; (3) the 
Beginnings of Discovery — America, the Sea-route to Asia, etc. 

Modern History. 

1. Social, political and religious life in Italy at the opening of the 
sixteenth century; the Renaissance as seen at Florence. 

2. The Protestant Revolt: (1) in Germany under Luther; (2) in Swit- 
zerland under Zwingli and Calvin; (3) in England and Scotland.- 

3. The Counter Reformation and its results : (1) the Jesuit Order and 
its founder, Ignatius Loyola; (2) the religious wars in France; (3) Philip II. 
and the Revolt in the Netherlands; (4) the Thirty Years' War. 

4. The Consolidation of France under Richelieu and her ascendancy 
under Louis XIV. 

5. The Rise of Russia; the work of Peter the Great and of Catharine 
II. 

6. The Rise of Prussia; the work of Frederick the Great. 

7. The French Revolution. 

8. The Napoleonic Era. 

9. The Great Powers since the Fall of Napoleon : (1) Political changes 
in France; (2) the Unification of Italy; (3) the Unification of Germany; (4) 
the Austria-Hungarian Monarchy; (5) Russia; (6) the United States. 



APPENDIX E.— INTERIM COURSES OF STUDY. 
I. — Geometry for District and Junior Standing, 1904-1905. 

For District teachers' non-professional certificates, the course in geo- 
metry for the examination of 1905 will be Euclid, Book I., easy deductions. 

Until June 30th, 1906, the course in Geometry, for the Middle School 
(Junior Standing) will be : Euclid, Books I., II., and III. ; easy deductions. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 159 



II. Geometry, History, and Science for Senior Standing, 1904-1906. 

Until June 30th, 1906, the Geometry, History, Physics, and Biology of 
the Upper School (Senior Standing) will be as follows : 

I. — Geometry. 

Euclid, Books I., II., III., IV., and VI." ; definitions of Book V.; de- 
ductions. 

II.— History. 

English History from the discovery of America till 1763. General out- 
lines of Greek History till the fall of Corinth. General outlines of Roman 
History till the death of Augustus. The geography relating to the history 
prescribed. 

III. — Physics. 

Mechanics : Measurement of velocity ; uniformly accelerated rectilin- 
eal motion; metric units of force, work energy and power; equilibrium of 
forces acting at a point; triangle, parallelogram, and polygon of forces; 
parallel forces; principle of moments; centre of gravity; laws of friction; 
numercial examples. 

Hydrostatics : Fluid pressure at a point ; pressure on a horizontal plane ; 
pressure on an inclined plane; resultant vertical pressure, and resultant 
horizontal pressure, when fluid is under air pressure and when not; trans- 
mission of pressure; Bramah's press; equilibrium of liquids of unequal dens- 
ity in a bent tube; the barometer; air-pump; water-pump, common and 
force; siphon. 

Electricity: Yoltaic cells, common kinds; chemical action in the cell; 
magnetic effects of the current; chemical effects of the current; voltameters, 
electroplating; astatic and tangent galvanometers; simple notions of poten- 
tial; Ohm's law; shunts; measurement of resistance; electric light, arc and 
incandescent; current induction; induction coil; dynamo and motor; the 
joule and watt; electric bell; telegraph; telephone; elements of terrestrial 
magnetism. 

IT. — Biology. 

1 . Elements of Zoology : Thorough examination of the external form , 
the gills, and the viscera of some common fish. Study of the prepared 
skeleton of the same. Demonstration of the arrangement of the muscular 
and nervous systems and the sense-organs, as far as these can be studied with- 
out the aid of the microscope. 

Comparison of the structure of the frog- with that of the fish. The 
skeleton of the pectoral and pelvic girdles and of the appendages of the frog 
should be studied, and the chief facts in the development of its spawn till the 
adult form is attained should be observed. 

Examination of the external form of a turtle and a snake. 

Examination of the structure of a bird. 

Study of the skeleton, and also of the teeth of a cat or dog. 

Study of the crayf sh as a type of the Arthropods. 

Con parison )f the crayfish with an .msect (grasshopper, cricket, cr cock- 
roach) ; also with a millipede and a spider. 

Examination of an earthworm. 



160 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Study of a fresh-water mussel. 

The principles of zoological nomenclature as illustrated by some of the 
common fresh water fish, such as the sucker and herring, bass and perch. 

Study of an amoeba or paramcecium, as a type of a unicellular animal. 

The modifications of the form of the body in vertebrates in connection 
with different methods of locomotion. The natural habits of the various 
animals examined. 

2. Elements of Botany : The practical study of representatives of the 
flowering plants of the locality in which the preparatory school is situated, 
and representatives of the chief subdivisions of cryptogams, such as a fern, 
a lycopod, a horsetail, a livewort, a moss, a lichen, a mushroom, and a chara. 

An elementary knowledge of the microscopic structure of the bean and 
the maize. Attention to drawing and description of parts of plants and to 
their classification. Comparison of different organs; morphology of root, 
stem, leaves and hair, parts of the flower; reproduction of flowering- plants, 
pollination, fertilization, and the nature of fruit and seeds. 

.Note. — At the examinations of 1905 and 1906 the candidate for Senior standing 
must submit to the Public School Inspector with his application a certificate from 
the principal of the school he attended in preparation for the examination, or other 
credible testimony, that he has taken up practically the Physics, Chemistry, and 
Biology of the Upper School. There will be no practical examinations in Science at the 
Department examinations. 



PROVINCIAL EXAMINATIONS IN DR AWING, PAINTING, ETC. 

1 . — Regulations . 
Approved January, 1904. 

1. The Education Department shall conduct an examination in April of 
each year for pupils attending art schools and evening classes. With the 
consent of the Education Department, pupils attending other schools may 
write at the same examination. The local expenses of the examination shall 
be paid by the school or class concerned. 

2. Each Presiding Officer shall be responsible for the safe keeping of 
the parcel containing the examination papers, and for keeping the same un- 
opened, until the time of the examination; he shall preside at and be re- 
sponsible for the proper conduct of the examination. Places shall be allotted 
to the candidates. sufficiently far apart that they cannot overlook each other. 
He shall allot to each candidate the number given him for each course on the 
list. 

3. Punctually at the time of the commencement of the examination in 
each subject the Presiding Officer, in the presence of the candidates, shall 
break the seal of the parcel containing the examination papers. The papers 
of one subject only shall be opened at one time, commencing with number 
1 on the time-table, and following consecutively, unless instructions are 
given to conduct two or more examinations at the same time. 

4. The presiding Officer may permit the teacher of the class to assist in 
setting up objects for model drawing, drawing from the "round," etc. But 
he must leave the room before the examination papers are opened. Should 
any teacher wish to be examined, the Presiding Officer will place him apart 
from the other candidates during the examination. 

5. Should any candidate be detected in copying from another, or allow- 
ing another to copy from him, or in taking into the room any book, notes, or 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 101 



anything from which he might derive assistance in the examination, or in 
talking or whispering, it shall be the duty of the Presiding Officer, if he ob- 
tains clear evidence of the fact at the time of its occurrence, to cause such 
candidate at once to leave the room; neither shall such candidate be permitted 
to return during the remaining part of the examination, and his name shall 
be struck oft' the list. If, however, the evidence be not clear at the time, or 
be obtained after the conclusion of the examination, the Presiding Officer 
shall report the case to the Minister of Education. 

6. No candidate leaving the room after issue of the examination papers, 
in any subject, shall be permitted to return during the examination of the 
subject in hand. Candidates who have been admitted late must hand in their 
papers at the same time as others. 

7- Punctually at the expiration of the time allowed, the Presiding 
Officer shall direct the candidates to stop drawing or writing, and cause them 
to hand in their papers immediately; and shall check off each paper so as 
to be certain that the number on the paper agrees with the- number of the 
candidate. In no case shall the Presiding Officer allow the teacher or any 
other person to examine the work of the students, neither shall he make any 
comments or remarks about the character of the work done. 

8. The Presiding Officer shall secure in a sealed parcel or envelope the 
work of the candidates and all unused papers and drawings, and at the close 
of the examination, and on the same day, shall forward the same by post or 
express, prepaid, to the Education Department. 

II. — Directions for Presiding Officer. 

1; When distributing the papers, allot to each candidate the number 
given him for each course on the accompanying lists; as the candidates name» 
and numbers are entered in the Department Eegisters ; no names on the list, 
must be erased, or others substituted for them. If extra candidate!- 2 present 
themselves for examination enter their names on the lists and allot them the 
last number on the list, with a letter of the alphabet added, thus 486, 486«, 
486&, etc. 

2. When collecting the papers, check the numbers on the papers and 
see that they correspond with each candidate's number on the lists. 47/ 
copies, drawings and papers must be returned to the Department of Educa- 
tion 

Primary Art Course. 

1. Freehand Drawing from Flat Examples. — An example to be copied 
is sent for each candidate. Notify the candidates that ruling, tracing or 
measuring, or other mechanical means of execution, are strictly forbid- 
den in working this exercise. It must be pure outline; no shading allowed. 

2. Practical Geometry. — Instruments must be used and all construction 
lines allowed to remain. 

3. Linear Perspective. — Instruments must be used and all working lines 
allowed to remain. 

4. Model Drawing. — Provide a sufficient number of the objects selected 
by the Department, and place them in such a position that all the candidates 
may have a full view of them. N"o measuring or use of instruments is allow- 
ed ; but the pencil may be held between the eye and the object for the purpos 
of estimating- its apparent size. This exercise must be pure outline, no shad- 
ing allowed ; the purpose being to combine correctness of drawing and neat- 
ness of execution. 



162 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



5. Memory or Blackboard Drawing. "No instruments or measuring al- 
lowed. Either crayon or pencil may be used. 

Advanced Art Course. 

1. Shading from Flat Examples. — Sufficient copies are sent for groups 
of two students to one drawing. ~No ruling or measuring allowed. No re- 
striction as to style of shading — either point or stump may be used. 

2. Outline Drawing from, the "round." — This drawing must be life 
size, from an antique or modern bust. No ruling or measuring allowed. If 
there be any shading the exercise will not be examined. 

3. Shading from the "round." — Provide a sufficient number of the ob- 
jects selected by the Department ; when possible they should be placed in the 
centre of the room ; if at night underneath the light, and students arranged at 
a uniform distance around them. No restriction as to style of shading. 

4. Drawing from Flowers, etc. — Select plants in bloom such as 
Chinese Primroses or small Geraniums, having a sufficient number of exam- 
ples so that there be not more than three or four candidates copying the same 
plant. This must be strict outline ; no shading allowed. Distance, 6 to 8 feet. 

5. Industrial Design. — Instruments to be used — units of design may 
be repeated mechanically by means of tracing paper. Drawings of flowers 
or ornaments are supplied on which to base designs — not as copies. The de- 
signs may be in pencil, ink, or tinted, at the option of the student. 

Mechanical Drawing Course. 

1. Projection and Descriptive Geometry. — Instruments to be used. 

2. Machine Drawing. — Instruments to be used. 

3. Building Construction. — Instruments to be used. 

4. Architectural Design. — Sessional work only is required. 

5. Advanced Perspective. — Instruments to be used. 

Industrial Art Course. 

1. Modelling in Clay. — Send specimens of work done during the session 
cer rifled by the teacher as having been executed entirely by the student. 

2. Wood-carving. — Send specimens of work done during the current 
academic year certified by the teacher, as haying been executed entirely by 
the student. 

3. Wood-engraving. — Send specimens of work done during the current 
academic year certified by the teacher, as having been executed entirely by 
the student. 

4. Lithography. — Send specimens of work done during the cjurrent 
academic year certified by the teacher, as having been executed entirely by 
the student. 

5. China Painting. — Send specimens of work done during the current 
academic year certified by the teacher, as having been executed entirely by 
the student. 

Extra Subjects. 

Specimens of paintings, wood carving, etc., sent for examination for 
certificates must be numbered and sent to the Department prepaid. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 163 



SUMMER SCHOOLS FOR TEACHERS, 1904. 

The Education Department has made arrangements for Summer Schools? 
to be held at Chatham, Cobourg and Kingston. . The main purpose of the 
Schools is to give instruction in the following Departments : — 

Manual Training. Nature Study. 

Household Science. Drawing. 

Classes will be organized so as to enable students to take as many as 
convenient of these departments. Lectures will be given by Specialists in 
the respective subjects. Any further information required will be obtain- 
ed by students after the classes are organized. No fees will be required, 
and it may be presumed that the cost of books, etc., will be slight. The 
Schools will be organized at 2 p.m., Monday, July 4th, when all neces- 
sary information will be given. The session will continue for three weeks. 
Certificates of attendance will be awarded to those students who show sa- 
tisfactory proficiency. 

Persons who desire to avail themselves of the privileges offered, should 
make application at an early date to the Principal of the Summer School 
they purpose attending. No special form of application will be needed. 

Toronto, April, 1904. 



APPORTIONMENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE PUBLIC SCHOOL 

GRANT FOR 1904. 

The apportionment of the Grant to the several municipalities is bas- 
ed upon the latest Returns of the Population for the year 1903, and the di- 
vision between the Public and Separate Schools on the average attendance 
of that year, as reported by the Inspectors, Public School Boards, and 
Separate School Trustees repectively. 

While the Separate Schools will receive their portion of the Grant di- 
rect from the Department, that of the Public Schools will be paid, accord- 
ing to this Schedule, through the respective County, City, Town, and Vil- 
lage Treasurers. 

Under the provisions of Section 5 of "An Act respecting the Educa- 
tion Department, 1901," the Education Department is empowered to appro- 
priate out of moneys voted by the Legislature for public and separate 
schools a sum not exceeding $5.00 for every school in which the Regula- 
tions of the Department as to equipment, ventilation, heating, lighting 
and the care of the premises generally have been complied with." 

Each County Inspector is therefore authorized to deduct from the ap- 
portionment of each township such an amount as will provide the sum of 
$5.00 to be paid on his order to each Trustee Board that has complied with 
the requirements mentioned. 

Toronto, May, 1904. 
14 E 



164 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Public School Apportionment to Counties for 1904. 



l. county op 

Municipalities. 

Brantford 

Burford 

Dumfries, South 

Oakland 

Onondaga 

Total 



BRANT. 

Apportionment. 

$584 00 

494 00 

284 00 

83 00 

126 00 



$1,571 00 



2. COUNTY OF BRUCE. 

Albemarle ■. $165 00 

Amabel 319 00 

Arran 273 00 

Brant 463 00 

Bruce 33100 

Carrick 290 00 

Culross 216 00 

Eastnor 204 00 

Elderslie 258 00 

Greenock 253 00 

Huron 379 00 

Kincardine 329 00 

Kinloss , 267 00 

Lindsay and St. Edmunds 93 00 

Saugeen 173 00 



Total 



$4,013 00 



3. COUNTY OF CARLETON. 

Fitzroy $29100 

Gloucester 503 00 

Goulbourn 288 00 

Gower, North 224 00 

Huntley 258 00 

March 87 00 

Marlborough 177 00 

Nepean 482 00 

Oseroode : 507 00 

Torbolton 110 00 

Total $2,927 00 

4. COUNTY OF DUFFERIN. 

Amaranth , $296 00 

Garafraxa, East 273 00 

Luther, East 204 00 

Melancthon 412 00 

Mono 338 00 

Mulmur 330 00 

Total $1,853 00 

5. COUNTY OF ELGIN. 

Aldborough $537 00 

Bayham 429 00 

Dorchester, South 153 00 

Dunwich 379 00 

Malahide 423 00 

Southwold 426 f 

Yarmouth 548 00 

Total $2,895 00 



6. COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



Anderdon 

Oolcheseter, North 
Colchester, South 
Gosneld, North ... 
Gosfield, South ..... 

Maidstone 

Mersea 

Maiden 

Pelee Island 

Rochester 

Sandwich, East. . . 
Sandwich, West ... 
Sandwich, South .. 

Tilbury, North 

Tilbury, West 



Total 
1 4a E 



$184 00 

2?0 00 

330 00 

243 00 

278 00 

242 CO 

492 00 

110 00 

75 00 

61 00 

71 00 

215 00 

137 00 

42 00 

241 00 

$2,941 00 



7. COUNTY OF FRONTENAC 
Municipalities. Apportionment. 

g^e $63 00 

Bedford 167 m 

Clarendon and Miller 98 00 

Hinchinbrooke ',' 154 00 

Howe Island 

Kennebec '.'.. .". '.'.'.'. .'.;.'..' 139 00 

Kingston 294 00 

Loughborough 185 00 

Olden 125 00 

£so 131 00 

Palmerston and N. and S. Canonto... 125 00 

Pittsburg 266 00 

Portland 239 00 

Storrington 204 00 

Wolfe Island 99 00 

Total $2,289 00 



I COUNTY OF GREY. 



Artemesia ... 

Bentinck 

Collingwood . 

Derby 

Egremont .... 
Euphrasia .... 

Glenelg 

Holland 

Keppel 

Normanby ... 

Csprqy 

Proton 

Sarawak 

St. Vincent . 

Sullivan 

Sydenham . . 



$392 00 
379 00 
413 00 
210 00 
367 00 
385 00 
282 00 
360 00 
421 00 
493 00 
arm 00 
352 00 
165 00 
325 00 
393 00 
410 00 



Total 



$5,719 00 



9. COUNTY OF HALDIMAND. 

Canborough $107 00 

Cayuga, North 182 00 

Cayuga, South 90 00 

Dunn 98 00 

Moulton 218 00 

Oneida 166 00 

Rainham 21100 

Seneca 207 00 

Sherbrooke 44 00 

W; lpole 457 00 

Total ....$1,780 00 



10. COUNTY OF HALIBURTON. 



$32 00 
71 00 



Anson and Hindon 

Cardiff 

Dudley, Dysart, Harcourt, Harburn, 

Guilford 120 00 



63 00 

5 00 
55 00 

6 00 
147 00 



Glamorgan 

Livingstone , 

Lutterworth 

McClintock 

Minden 

Monmouth 66 00 

Nightingale 100 

Sherbourne 17 °2 

Snowdon 96 00 

Stanhope 52 00 

Total $728 00 



11. COUNTY OF HALTON. 

Esquesing $414 00 

Nassagaweya 276 00 

Nelson 314 00 

Trafalgar 402 00 

Total $1,406 00 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



16i 



12. COUNTY OF HASTINGS. 



COUNTY OF LAMBTON.-Con. 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Carlow $82 00 

Dungannon 92 00 

Elzevir and Grimsthorpe 156 00 

Faraday 130 00 

Hungerford 434 CO 

Huntingdon 264 00 

McClure, Wicklow and Bangor 11100 

Herschel and Monteagle 233 00 

Madoc 399 00 

Marmora and Lake 178 CO 

Mayo 64 00 

Rawdon 389 00 

Sidney 422 00 

Thurlow 422 00 

Tudor and Cashel 1C9 00 

Limerick 62 00 

Wollaston 92 00 

Tyendinaga 310 00 



Total 



$3,949 CO 



13. COUNTY OF HUEON. 

Ashfield £331 00 

Colborne 21100 

Goderich 279 00 

Grey * 388 00 

Hay 371 CO 

Howick 459 00 

Hullett 311 00 

McKillop 249 00 

Morris 303 00 

Stanley 244 00 

Stephen 402 00 

Tuckersmith 285 00 

Turnberry 247 CO 

Usborne 266 00 

Wawanosh, East 225 00 

Wawanosh, West 229 00 



Total .... 



$4,850 00 



14. COUNTY OF KENT. 

Camden $294 00 

Chatham 608 00 

Dover 375 00 

Harwich 545 00 

Howard 405 00 

Orford 318 00 

Raleigh 490 00 

Romney 217 00 

Tilbury, East 388 00 

Zone 148 00 

Total $3,788 00 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Enniskillen $565 00 

Euphemia 259 00 

Moore 524 00 

Plympton 408 00 

Sarnia 250 00 

Sombra .... «w9 00 

Warwick 374 00 



Total 



$3,957 00 



16. COUNTY OF LANARK. 

Bathurst $278 00 

Beckwith 189 00 

Burgess, North 46 CO 

Dalhousie and Sherbrooke, North 204 00 

Darling 87 00 

Drummond 224 00 

Elmsley, North 120 00 

Lanark 209 00 

Lavant 63 00 

Montague 230 00 

Packenham 238 00 

Ramsay 247 00 

Sherbrooke, South 96 00 

Total $2,231 00 



17. COUNTY OF LEEDS. 

Bastard and Burgess, South $328 00 

Crosby, North 136 00 

Crosby, South 192 00 

Elizabethtown 463 00 

Elmsley, South 87 CO 

Kitley 228 00 

Leeds and Lansdowne, Front 328 00 

Leeds and Lansdowne, Rear 268 00 

Yonge and Escott, Rear 128 CO 

Yonge, Front and Escott 292 00 



Total 



... $2,450 00 



17 (a) COUNTY OF GRENVILLE. 

Augusta $436 00 

Edwardsburg .... 410 00 

Gower, South 90 00 

Oxford, Rideau 310 00 

Wolford 206 00 

Total $1,452 00 



18. COUNTY OF LENNOX AND 
ADDINGTON. 



15. COUNTY OF LAMBTON. 

Bosanquet $309 CO 

Brooke 41100 

Dawn 408 00 



Adolphustown $64 00 

Amherst Island 96 00 

Anglesea, Effingham and Kaladar ... 157 00 

Camden, East 563 00 

Denbigh, Abinger and Ashley 127 00 

Ernestown 325 00 



166 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNT! OF LENNOX AND ADDINGTON.- 
Con. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Fredericksburg, North $1?3 nn 

Fredericksburg, South 109 00 

Richmond 2 

Sheffield • 208 00 

Total $ 2 > 08800 



19. COUNTY OF LINCOLN. 

Caistor * 19500 

Clinton 22000 

Gainsborough 168 00 

Grantham 226 00 

Grimsby, North 142 00 

Grimsby, South I 5700 

Louth 175 00 

Niagara • 204 0Q 

Total $1,487 00 



20. COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 

Adelaide $ 226 00 

Biddulph 190 00 

Caradoc 425 00 

Delaware 177 °° 

Dorchester, North 398 00 

Ekfrid '. 308 00 

Lobo 3080 ° 

London .-.. ^00 

McGillivray 322 00 

Metcalfe 180 00 

Mosa 291 0° 

Nissouri, West .' 313 00 

Westminster * 527 00 

Williams, East 157 00 

Williams, West 162 00 

Total $4,904 00 

21. COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 

Charlotteville $377 Off 

Houghton 237 00 

Middleton 289 00 

Townsend 455 00 

Walsingham, North 223 00 

Walsingham, South 204 00 

Windham 397 00 

Woodhouse 262 00 

Total $2,444 00 



22. COUNTY OF NORTHUMBER- 
LAND. 

Alnwick $122 00 

Brighton 296 00 

Cramahe 275 00 

Haldimand 393 00 



COUNTY OF NORTHUMBERLAND.— 
Con. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Hamilton 44000 

Monaghan, South 106 00 

Murray 315 00 

Percy 318 00 

Seymour • 346 00 

Total *2,611 00 



22. (a) COUNTY OF DURHAM. 

Cartwright $208 00 

Cavan 295 00 

Clarke 397 00 

Darlington 459 00 

Hope 382 00 

Manvers 34100 

Total $2,082 00 



23. COUNTY OF ONTARIO. 

Brock $436 00 

Mara 296 00 

Pickering 632 00 

Rama 150 00 

Reach 392 00 

Scott 257 00 

Scugog Island 57 00 

Thorah * 156 00 

Uxbridge 327 00 

Whitby, East 303 00 

Whitby 250 00 

Total $3,256 00 

24. COUNTY OF OXFORD. 

Blandford $192 00 

Blenheim 505 00 

Dereham 417 00 

Nissouri, East 282 00 

Norwich, North 268 00 

Norwich, South 300 00 

Oxford, North 149 00 

Oxford, East 243 00 

Oxford, West 244'00 

Zorra, East 483 00 

Zorra, West 294 00 



Total 



... $3,377 00 



25. COUNTY OF PEEL. 

Albion $256 00 

Caledon 468 00 

Chinguacousy 44100 

Gore of Toronto 96 00 

Toronto 594 00 

Total $1,855 00 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



167 



26. COUNTY OF PERTH. 



30. COUNTY OF RENFREW. 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Blanchard $30100 

Downie 289 00 

Easthope, North 259 00 

Easthope, South 223 00 

Ellice .' 523 00 

Elma 453 00 

Fullarton 259 00 

Hibbert 18100 

Logan 336 00 

Mornington 339 00 

Wallace 327 00 

Total $3,290 00 

27. COUNTY OF PETERBOROUGH. 

Anstruther $33 00 

Asphodel 193 00 

Belmont 218 00 

Burleigh 4100 

Cavendish 16 00' 

Chandos 95 00 

Douro 256 00 

Dummer 215 00 

Ennismore 93 00 

Galway 110 00 

Harvey 118 00 

Methuen 29 00 

Monaghan, North 107 00 

Otonabee ■. 380 00 

Smith 32100 



Municipalities. 



Apportionment. 



Total .... 



$2,225 00 



28. COUNTY OF PRESCOTT. 

Alfred $3100 

Caledonia 108 00 

Hawkesbury, East 273 00 

Hawkesbury, West .' 320 00 

Longueuil 55 00 

Plantagenet, North ., 314 00 

Plantagenet, South 204 00 



Total $1,305 00 



28 (a) COUNTY OF RUSSELL. 

Cambridge $153 00 

Clarence 126 00 

Cumberland , 322 00 

Russell 134 00 



Total 



$735 00 



29. COUNTY OF PRINCE EDWARD 

Ameliasburg $354 00 

Athol 120 00 

Hallowell 371(00 

Hillier 169 00 

Marysburg, North 13100 

Marysburg, South 160 00 

Sophiasburg 212 00 

Total $1,517 00 



Admaston $252 00 

Algona, South 115 00 

Alice and Fraser 24100 

Bagot-and Blithfield 18100 

Brougham 49 0Q 

Bromley 136 00 

Brudenell and Lynedoch 167 00 

Grattan 222 00 

Griffith and Matawatchan 55 00 

Hagarty, Jones, Sherwood, Richards 

and Burns 201 00" 

Head, Clara and Maria 41 00 

Horton 173 00 

McNab 413 00 

Pembroke 100 00 

Petewawa 127 00 

Radcliffe 38 00 

Raglan *. 89 00 

Rolph, Wylie, McKay, Buchanan 120 00 

Ross 24100 

Sebastopol 77 00 

Stafford 106 00 

Westmeath .-. 39100 

Wilberforce and Algona, North 293 00 



Total $3,83100 



31. COUNTY OF SIMCOE. 

Adjala $192 00 

Essa 493 00 

Floss 412 00 

Gwillimbury, West 264 00 

Innisfil 379 00 

Matchedash 44 00 

Medonte 464 00 

Nottawasaga .*. 606 00 

Orillia 455 00 

Oro 462 00 

Sunnidale •.. 25100 

Tay 593 00 

Tiny 397 00 

Tecumseth .. 365 00 

Tossorontio 166 00 

Vespra 323 00 



Total 



....$5,866 00 



32. COUNTY OF STORMONT. 

Cornwall $616 00 

Finch • 387 00 

Osnabruck 584100 

Roxborough ,..„;. 414 00 

Total $2,001 00 

32. (a) COUNTY OF DUNDAS. 

Matilda $428 00 

Mountain 348 00 

Williamsburg 463 00 

Winchester 397 00 



Total 



..$1,636 0C; 



168 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



32 (b) COUNTY OF GLENGAEEY. 



COUNTY OF WELLINGTON.-Con. 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Charlottenburg $538 00 

Kenyon < <♦(? uU 

Lancaster 408 00 

Lochiel 390 00 

Total $1,815 00 

33. COUNTY OF VICTOEIA. 

Bexley $104 00 

Carden 82 00 

Dalton 6100 

Eldon 346 00 

Emily 244 00 

Fenelon 266 00 

Laxton, Digby and Longford 89} 00 

Mariposa ib<» U0 

Ops 274 00 

Somervilte 222 00 

Verulam 223 00 

Total $2,375 00 

34. COUNTY OF WATEELOO. 

Dumfries, North $236/00" 

Waterloo 729 00 

Wellesley 444 00 

Wilmot 530 00! 

Woolwich 476 00 

Total : . . $2,415 00 

35. COUNTY OF WELLAND. 

Bertie $340 00 

Crowland 115\ 00 

Humberstone 311 00 

Pelham 293 00 

Stamford 207 00 

Thorold 209 00 

Wainfleet ' 299 00 

Willoughby 107 00 

Total $1,881 00 

36. COUNTY OF WELLINGTON. 

Arthur $263 00, 

Eramosa 317 00 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Erin 402 00 

Garafraxa, West $260 0QT 

Guelph 268 00 

Luther, West 244 00 

Maryborough 352 0Q 

Minto 349 00 

Nichol 190 00 

Peel 424 §0 

Pilkington 156 00 

Puslinch 34& 00 



Total 



.. $3,573 00 



37. COUNTY OF WENTWOETH. 

Ancaster $433 00 

Barton 448 00. 

Beverly «»ol 00 

Binbrook 144 00 

Flamborough, East 292 00 

Flamborough, West 340 00 

Glanford 176 00 

Slatfleet 402 00 

Total $2,696 00 

38. COUNTY OF YOEK. 

Etobicoke $452 00 

Georgina 198 00 

Gwillimbury, East 40100 

Gwillimbury, North 189 00 

King ' • 583 00 

Markham 567 00) 

Scarborough 427 00 

Vaughan 507 00 

Whitchurch 373 00 

York 1,23100 



Total 



.... $4,927 00 



39. DISTEICTS. 



Algoma, Muskoka, Nipissing, Parry 
Sound, Eainy Eiver, and Thunder 
Bay, including rural, public and 
separate schools, b ut not any 
town or village named on this 
list $40,000 00 



Total $40,000 00 



Appoetionment to Eoman Catholic Sepaeate Schools foe 1904. 



School Sections. 

Ad.i ala 

Alfred 

do 

do 7 (with 8, Plantagenet, 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do .... • 



Apportionment. 


10 


$26 00 


3 


18 00 


6 


22 00 


et, South) 


9 00 


7 


33 00 


8 


46 00 


9 


25 00 


10 


78 00 


11 


18 00 


12 


25 00 


13 


30 00 



Sohool Sections Apportionment. 

Alfred 14 14 00 

do '. 15 24 00 

Admaston 4 17 00 

Anderdon 2, 5 and 8 (with 6 and 9 

Sandwich West) 30 00 

do 3 and 4 19 00 

Arthur 6 31 00 

do 10 34 00 

Ashfleld 2 38 00 

Asphodel ' 4 21 00 

Augusta 15 11 00 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



169 



Apportionment to Roman Catholic Separate Schools for 1904.— Continued. 



School Sections. Apportionment. 

Balfour, 1, with 1 Rayside (District 

of Algoma) .... 

Biddulph 3 11 00 

do 4 33 00 

do 6 22 00 

(with 1 McGillivray) 11 00 
Bonfield, 1A, IB, 2, 4 (District of 

Nipissing) ... 

Brant (with 3 Greenock) . . 2 9 00 

Brighton 1 (15) 17 00 

Bromley 4 15 00 

do • 6 25 00 

do 7 46 00 

Brougham 1 14 00 

Burgess, North 2 2100 

do 4 14 00 

do 6 10 00 

Caledonia 3, 4 and 10 12 00 

do 6 (with 7 Plantagenet S.) 15 00 

do 10 17 00 

do 12 33 00 

do 13 15 00 

Cambridge 3 25 00 

do 4 19 00 

do 5 32 00 

do 6 20 00 

do 6 and 7 43 00 

do 14P 18 00 

Carrick 1 30 00 

do (with 1 Culross) 1 64 00 

do 2 19 00 

do (with 2 Culross) 2 12 00 " 

do 4 29 00 

do 14 113 00 

Charlottenburg 15 44 00 

do 16 25 00 

Chisholm and Boulter 1 (Nipissing) 

Chisholm 2 do 

Clarence 3 14 00 

do 5 85 00 

do 6 52 00 

do 8 39 00 

do 11 28 00 

do 12 19 00 

do 13 11 00 

do 14 23 00 

do 16 29 00 

do 17 21 00 

do 18 19 00 

do 19 U 00 

do -20 14 00 

do 21 28 00 

Cornwall 1 14 00 

do 16 65 00 

Crosby, North 4 67 00 

do 7 4 00 

Culross (with 1 Carrick) 1 77 00 

do (with 2 Carrick) 2 14 00 

Cumberland 10 5 00 

do 11 18 00 

do 13 16 00 

do 14 32 00 

Hilke, 6 (District of Algoma) . . 

Downie 9 33 00 



Apportionment 

3 60 00 

7 32 00 

9 39 00 

1 (District of 

2 5 00 

1 4 00 

6 to be app'd 

7 18 00 



56 00 
6 00 



School Sections. 

Dover 

do 

do 

Dunnett and Rutte 

Nipissing) 

Edwardsburg 

Ellice 

do 

do 

Ferris, 3 (District of Nipissing) 
do 4 do 

Finch 5 

Flamborough, West 2 

Gibbons, 1 (District of Nipissing) 

Greenock, 3 (with 2 Brant) 66 00 

Glenelg 5 15 00 

do 7 27 00 

Gloucester, 1 (with 3 Osgoode) . . 9 00 

do 4, 5 and 12 7 00 

do 14 30 00 

do 15 67 00 

do 17 22 00 

do 20 16 00 

do 22 13 00 

do 25 96 CO 

do 26 19 00 

Griffith, etc 3 13 00 

Hagarty 4 44 Q0 

do 12 50 00 

Haldimand 2 27 00 

do 14 19 00 

Harwich 9 26 00 

Hawkesbury, East 2 58 00 

do 4 15 00 

do 6 14 00 

do 7 101 00 

do 10 54 00 

do 11 30 00 

do 12 14 00 

do 15 24 00 

do 16 11 00 

Hay 1 41 00 

do 11 to be app'd 

Hibbert (1) 3 2100 

do 2 (with McKillop & Logan) 39 00 

do 3 (with McKillop, etc.) 3 00 

Howe Island .. .« 1 12 00 

do . . 2 18 00 

do 3 20 00 

Holland, etc 3 18 00 

Hullett 2 19 00 

Keewatin, 1 (see District of Algoma) 

Kenyon 12 15 00 

Kingston 8 18 00 

Lancaster 14 43 00 

Lochiel n 22 00 

do 12A 34 00 

do 12B 51 00 

Longueuil, West 2 21 00 

do 4A 26 00 

do 7 19 00 

Loughboro' 2 1100 

do 10 12 00 



170 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Apportionment to Roman Catholic Separate Schools for 1904.— Concluded. 



School Sections. Apportionments. 

Maidstone 1 48 00 

do 2 2300 

do 4 (with 2 Rochester) . . 20 00 

do 8 (with 5 Sandwich S) . . 27 00 

Maiden 3A 33 00 

do 3B 21 00 

Mara 3 60 00 

March • 3 43 00 

Marmora and Lake 1 14 00 

Matawatchan 3 27 00 

Moore 3, 4 and 5 10 00 

Mornington 4 26 00 

McGlllivray, 1 (with 9 Biddulph) . . 9 00 

McKillop 1 21 00 

do 3 (with Hibbert).. •• 6 00 

do (2 Hibbert, etc.) 11 00 

Nepean 7 30 00 

do 15 93 00 

Nichol 1 15 00 

Normanby 5 16 00 

do 10 16 00 

Osgoode 1 15 00 

do 2(15) 9 00 

do 3 (with 1 Gloucester) . . 11 00 
Papineau, 1 (see District ox Nipissing) 

do 2 do do 

Papineau 2B do do 

Peel.... 8 20 00 

do 12 17 00 

Percy 5 10 00 

do 12 (with 12 Seymour) . . 3 00 

Plantagenet, North 4 16 00 

do 7 23 00 

do 8 59 00 

do 9 33 00 

do 12 9 00 

Plantagenet, South 4 5100 

do 7 (with 6 Cale- 

do 7 39 00 

donia) 13 00 

Plantagenet, South 8 24 00 

do 8 (with 7 Alfred).. 7 00 

do 11 to be app'd 

Portland 11 16 00 

Proton 6 15 00 

Raleigh 4 8 00 

do .' 5 24 00 

do 6 20 00 

Rayside, 1 (with 1 Balfour) Algoma . . 

Richmond 10 and 17 14 00 

Rochester, 2 (with 4 Maidstone) . . 22 00 

do 3 69 00 

do 6 55 00 

do 7 47 00 

do 9 and 14 37 00 

do 10 (with 11 Tilbury, N.). 10 00 

Roxboro' 12 84 00 

do 16 31 00 

Russell, 1 (with 12 Winchester) .. 6 00 

do 4 18 00 

do •. 6 101 00 



School sections. 

Russell 

do 

do 

do 

Sandwich, East.. 
do 
do 
do 

do West.. 
do 



Apportionment. 

7 21 00 

8 28 00 

13 16 00 

14 18 00 

1 110 00 

2 19 00 

3 19 00 

4 89 00 
1 38 00 
4 23 00 



do 6 and 9 (with 2, 5, 8, - 

Anderdon 26 00 

Sandwich, South, 5 (with 8 Maidstone) 26 00 

do 7 26 00 

Seymour, 12 (with 12 Percy) .. 3 00 

Sheffield 5 28 00 

Sherwood 6 61 00 

Sombra 5 16 00 

Stafford 2 25 00 

Stephen 6 33 00 

Springer, 1 (District of Nipissing).. .. .. 

do 2 do do .... 

do 3 do do 

Stanley ■ 1 to be app'd 

Sydenham 7 8 00 

Tilbury, North 1 60 00 

do 2 37 

do 6 29 00 

do 7 45 00 

do 11 (with 10 Rochester) 22 00 

Tilbury, West 11 27 00 

do East (inc. arrears) . . 1 18 00 

do 3 to be app'd 

Tiny 2 94 00 

Toronto Gore 6 13 00 

Tyendinaga 18 13 00 

do .... : 20 20 00 

do 24 20 00 

do 28 13 00 

do 30 17 00 

Vespra 7 4 00 

Waterloo 13 61 00 

Wawanosh, West 1 19 00 

Wellesley 5 17 00 

do 9&10 24 00 

do 11 73 00 

do 12 3 00 

Westminster 13 10 00 

Widdifield, 2 (District of Nipissing) . . 

Williams, W T est 10 15 00 

Wilmot 15$ 60 00 

Winchester 12 (with Russell) 13 00 

Windham 8 46 00 

Wolfe Islaud 1 9 00 

do 2 13 00 

do 4 30 00 

do 7 15 00 

Woolwich 10 26 0C 

Yonge and Escott R 4 11 00 

York 1 33 00 



$6,759 00 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



171 



Apportionment to Cities, Towns and Villages for 1904. 



CITIES 



Belleville .... 
Brantford .... 
Chatham .... 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston . . 

London 

Niagara. Falls 

Ottawa 

St. Catharines 
St. Thomas . . 
Stratford .. 

Toronto 

Windsor .. .. 
Woodstock ... 



Total 



Alexandria . . . 

Alliston 

Almonte .. .. 
Amherstburg . 
Arnprior .. .. 

Aurora 

Aylmer 

Barrie 

Berlin 

Blenheim . . 
Bothwell . . 
Bowmanville . . 
Bracebridge ... 
Brampton . . . 
Brockville.. .. 
Bruce Mines . . 
Cache Bay . . . 
Carleton Place 

Clinton 

Cobourg . . . . 
Collin gwood .. 
Copper Cliff . . 
Cornwall . . . . 
Desez'onto . . 

Dresden 

Dnndas 

Dunnville . . 

Durham 

East Toronto . 

Essex 

Forest 

Fort Frances . . 
Fort William . 
Gait 



TOWNS. 



Gananoque 



Goderich . . 
Gore Bay .. 
Gravenhurst 
ITarriston . . 
Hawkesbury 



Public 


Separate 


i 


Schools. 


Schools. 


Total. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


921 00 


286 00 


1,207 00 


2,005 00 


240 00 


2,245 00 


920 00 


199 00 


1,119 00 


1,118*00 


258 00 


1,376 00 


5,523 00 


1,120 00 


6,643 00 


1,754 00 


459 00 


2,213 00 


4,211 00 


654 00 


4,865 00 


784 00 


122 00 


896 00 


3,497 00 


3,975 00 


7,472 00 


1,023 00 


272 00 


1,295 00 


1,267 00 


185 00 


1,452 00 


1,143 00 


247 00 


1,390 00 


22,803 00 


3,762 00 


26,565 00 


1,135 00 


492 00 


' 1,127 00 


1,061 00 


66 00 


1,627 00 


$49,165 00 


$12j,327 00 


$61,492 00 


65 00 


185 00 


250 00 


152 00 




152 00 


270 00 


85 00 


355 00 


130 00 


134 00 


264 00 


275 00 


174 00 


449 00 


201 00 




201 00 


265 00 




265 00 


626 00 


116 00 


742 00 


978 00 


291 00 


1,269 00 


187 00 




187 00 


104 00 




104 00 


339 00 




339 00 


323 00 




323 00 


345 




345 00 


836 00 


256 00 


1,092 00 


87 00 




87 00 


69 00 




69 00 


503 00 




503 00 


277 00 


141 00 


277 00 


362 00 




503 00 


850 00 




850 00 


261 00 


407 00 


261 00 


321 00 




728 00 


429 00 




429 00 


193 00 


91 00 


193 00 


324 00 




415 00 


269 00 




269 00 


208 00 




208 00 


211 00 




211 00 


177 00 




177 00 


191 00 


(in town gt.) 


191 00 


94 00 


171 00 


94 00 


523 00 


62 00 


l 694 00 


923 00 




985 00 


447 00 


58 00 


447 00 


'429 00 




487 00 


S7 00 




87 00 


267 00 




267 00 


219 00 


226 00 


219 00 


32 00 




258 00 



172 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Apportionment to Cities, Towns and Villages for 1904.— Continued. 



TOWNS.— Continued. 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Schools. 



Total 



Heapeler 

Huntsville . . . . 
Ingersoli .... 
Kincardine ... 
Kingsville . . 

Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

Little Current . . 

Mattawa 

Meaford 

Midland 

Mitchell 

Milton 

Mount Forest . . 

Napanee 

New Liskeard . . 
Newmarket . . 

Niagara 

North Bay . . 
North Toronto . . 

Oakville 

Orangeville . . . 

Orillia 

Oahawa 

Owen Sound 

Palmerston . . 

Parkhill 

Paris 

Parry Sound . . 

Pembroke 

Penetariguishene 

Perth 

Peterborough . . . 

Petrolea 

Picton 

Port Arthur . . . 
Port Hope . . 

Prescott 

Preston 

Rainy River . . . 

Rat Portage 

Renfrew 

Ridgetown . . 



Sandwich 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Seaforth 

Simcoe 

Smith's Falls . . . 

Stayner 

Sturgeon Falls ... 

St. Mary's 

Strathroy 

Sudbury 

Thessalon 

Thornbury . . 

Thorold 

Tillsonburg .... 
Toronto Junction 



$ c. 

295 00 
Z67 00 
499 00 
291 00 
202 00 
318 00 
650 00 
327 00 
121 00 
34 00 

243 00 
459 00 

> 226 00 
140 00 
251 00 
348 00 
121 00 
259 00 
174 00 
282 00 

244 00 
186 00 
312 00 
485 00 
466 00 

1,072 00 
171 00 

138 00 
368 00 
340 00 
325 00 
338 00 
309 00 

1,138 00 
475 00 
380 00 
401 00 
498 00 
249 00 
238 00 
170 00 
454 00 
236 00 
274 00 
88 00 
855 CO 
829 00 
210 00 
364 00 
632 00 

139 00 
105 00 
368 00 
373 00 

78 00 
132 00 

95 00 
166 00 
272 00 
842 00 



$ c. 


$ c. 




295 00 


57 00 


267 00 




556 00 




291 00 





202 00 




318 00 


210 00 


860 00 




327 00 




121 00 


137 00 


171 00 




243 00 




459 00 




226 00 




140 00 




251 00 




348 00 




121 00 


32 00 


291 00 




174 00 


159 00 


441 OO 


. 


244 00 


23 00 


209 00 




312 00 


130 00 


615 00 


57 00 


523 00 


70 00 


1,142 C9 




171 0C 


29 00 


167 00 


52 00 


420 ff> 





340 00 


"Z89 00 


614 oa 




338 00 


143 00 


452 00 


479 00 


1,617 00 




Alii 00 


38 00 


418 00 


143 00 


544 00 




498 00 


102 00 


351 00 


54 00 


292 00 


(in town gt.) 


170 00 


102 00 


556 00 


157 00 


393 00 




274 00 


110 00 


198 00 


117 00 


972 00 


143 00 


972 00 


47 00 


257 00 




364 00 




632 00 




139 00 


153 00 


258 00 


46 00 


414 00 




373 00 


107 00 


185 00 




132 00 




95 00 


83 00 


249 00 




272 00 




842 00 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



173 



Apportionment to Cities, Towns and Villages for 1904.— Continued. 



TOWNS.— Continued. 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Schools. 



Total. 



Trenton 
Uxbridge . . . . 
Vankleek Hill 
Walkerton . . . 
Walkerville . . 
Wallaceburg . 

Waterloo 

Welland .... 
Whitby . . 
Wiarton . . 
Wingham . . . 



Total 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES. 

Act071 

Ailsa Craig 

Alvinston 

Arkona 

Arthur 

Athens , 

Ayr 



Bath 

Bayfield 

Beamsville . . 
Beaverton . . 

Beeton 

Belle River ... 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon . 
Bolton . . 
Bradford ... . 
Bridgeburg . . 
Brighton . . . 
Brussels .... 
Burk's Palls. 
Burlington. . 
Caledonia . . 
Campbellford 
Cannington . 
Cardinal . . . 
Casselman . . 
Cayuga . . 
Chesley .... 
Chesterville .. 
Chippawa 
Clifford.. .. 

Cobden 

Colborne . . 
Creemore . . 

Delhi 

Drayton 

Dundalk . . . 

Dutton 

Eganville . . 
Elmira . . 

Elora 

Embro 

Erin 



$ c. 
371 00 

192 00 
127 00 
252 00 

193 00 
309 00 
363 00 
202 00 
243 00 
297 00 
275 00 



$35,995 00 



170 00 

85 00 
97 00 
54 00 

77 00 

107 00 
102 00 

46 00 
65 00 

94 00 
90 00 
81 00 

7 00 
105 00 

108 00 

78 00 
116 00 
156 00 
158 00 
121 00 
148 00 

95 00 
146 00 

<57 00 
294 00 
152 00 
154 00 

27 00 
113 00 
212 00 
108 00 

64 00 

72 00 

86 00 
120 00 

71 00 

96 00 

96 00 

97 00 
105 00 

71 00 

143 00 

70 00 

63 00 



$ c. 

129 00 



152 00 

113 00 



69 00 
75 00 



32 00 



$6,236 00 



65 00 



59 00 



23 00 



86 00 



63 00 



$ c. 
500 00 

192 00 
279 00 
365 00 

193 00 
378 00 
438 00 
202 00 
275 00 
297 00 
275 00 



$42,231 00 



170 00 

85 00 
97 00 
54 00 

142 00 

107 00 
102 00 

46 00 

65 00 
94 00 
90 00 
81 00 

66 00 
105 00 

108 00 
78 00 

116 00 
156 00 
158 00 
144 00 
148 00 

45 00 
146 00 

97 00 
294 00 
152 00 
154 00 
113 00 
113 00 
212 00 
108 00 

64 10 

72 00 

86 00 
120 00 

71 00 
96 00 

96 00 

97 00 
105 00 
134 00 
143 00 

70 00 
63 00 



174 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Apportionment to Cities, Towns and Villages For 1904— Continued. 



.INCORPORATED TILLAGES.— Con. 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Schools. 



Total. 



Exeter 

Fenelon Palls . . 

Fergus 

Fort Erie 

Garden Island . 

Georgetown 

Glencoe 

Grand Valley . . 

Grimsby 

Hagersville . . 
Hastings ... . # .. 

Hanover 

Havelock 

Hensall 

Hintonburg . . . 
Holland Landing 

Iroquois 

Kemptville . . 

Lakefield 

Lanark 

Lancaster . . 

L'Orignal 

Lucan 

Lucknow . . 

Madoc 

Markdale 

Markham . . 

Marmora 

Maxville 

Merrickville 

Merritton 

Millbrook . . 
Milverton . . 
Morrisburg . . . 

Newboro' 

Newburgh . . 

Newbury 

Newcastle . . 
New Hamburg .. 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Oil Springs 

Omemee 

Ottawa East . . 

Paisley 

Point Edward . . 
Portsmouth . . . 
Port Carling . . 
Port Colborne . . 
Port Dalhousie . 
Port Dover . . 
Port Elgin . . 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan . . . 
Port Stanley . . 
Richmond . . 
Richmond Hill . 
Rockland 



$ o. 

230 00 

141 00 
169 00 
105 00 

29 00 
161 00 

118 00 
98 00 

111 00 

115 00 

55 00 

178 00 

120 00 
88 00 

172 CO 
50 00 

119 00 
160 00 

142 00 

105 00 

65 00 
110 00 

98 00 

121 00 
135 00 

115 00 
119 00 

98 00 
91 00 

116 00 
157 00 

106 00 
85 00 

185 00 
54 00 

68 00 
43 00 

69 00 
153 00 
151 00 
105 00 
116 00 

75 00 

85 00 
121 00 
128 00 

50 00 

33 00 
151 00 

84 00 
139 00 
162 00 
171 00 

88 00 

66 00 
54 00 
82 00 
18 00 



$ c. 



10 00 



36 00 



168 00 



36 00 



41 00 



96 00 



24 00 
34-00 



141 00 



$ c. 
230 00 

141 00 
179 00 
105 00 

29 00 
161 00 

118 00 
98 00 

111 00 
115 00 

91 00 
178 00 
1?0 00 

88 00 
340 00 

50 00 

119 00 
160 00 

142 00 

105 00 
65 00 

146 00 

98 00 

121 00 

135 00 

115 00 
119 00 

98 00 
91 00 

116 00 
198 00 

106 00 
85 00 

185 00 
54 00 

68 00 
43 00 

69 00 
153 00 
151 00 
105 00 
116 00 

75 00 
181 00 • 
121 00 
128 00 

74 00 

33 00 
151 00 
118 00 
139 00 
162 00 
171 00 

88 00 

66 00 

54 00 

82 00 
159 00 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



175 



Apportionment to Cities, Towns and Villages for 1904?. — Concluded. 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES.-Con. 


Pubic 
Schools. 


Separate 
Schools. 


Total. 


Shelburne 

Southampton 


$ 0. 

143 00 
204 00 

59 00 
99 00 

159 00 

60 00 
48 00 
77 00 
79 00 

116 00 
96 00 
73 00 

64 00 

65 00 
62 00 

125 00 

40 00 

38 00 

71 00 
127 00 
167 00 

83 00 
120 00 

144 00 
79 00 
62 00 
89 00 
64 00 


$ c. 




'.'. ... '.'. '.'. '.'. 


66 00 
30 00 

15 00 


$' c. 
143 00 
204 00 




59 00 




99 00 


Stouffville 

Streetsville 


159 00 
60 00 


Sundridge 

Sutton 


48 00 
77 00 


Tara 


79 00 


Teeswater 

Thamesville 


116 00 
96 00 


Thedford ". 


73 00 


Tilbury 


130 00 
65 00 
62 00 


Tottenham 


Tweed 

Vienna 


155 00 
40 00 


Wardsville 


38 00 


Waterdown 


71 00 


Waterford 


127 00 


Watford 


167 00 


Wellington 


83 00 
135 00 


Winchester 

Woodbridge 

Woodville 


144 00 
79 00 
62 00 
89 00 


Wroxeter 


64 00 








Total ,.. 


$13,563 00 


$993 00 


$14,556 00 



Summary of Apportionment for 1904. 



COUNTIES. 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Schools. 



Totals. 





«p c. 
1,571 00 
4,013 00 
2,927 00 
1,853 00 
2,895 00 
2,941 00 
2,289 00 
5,719 00 
1,780 00 

728 00 
1,406 00 
3,949 00 
4,850 00 
3,788 00 
3,957 00 
14,231 00 
3,902 00 
• 2,088 00 
1,487 00 


S c. 


$ c. 

1,571 00 


2. Bruce 

3. Carleton 

4. Dufferin 


433 00 
480 00 


4,44b UU 
3,407 00 
1,853 00 


5. Elgin 


1,057 00 
174 00 
115 00 


2,895 00 


6. Essex 

7. Frontenac 

8. Grey 

9. Haldimand 


3,998 00 
2,463 00 
5,834 00 
1,780 00 


10. Haliburton 

11. Halton 




728 00 
1,406 00 


12. Hastings 

13. Huron 


97 00 
188 00 
227 00 

26 00 
45 00 

98 00 
42 00 


4,046 00 
5,038 00 


14. Kent 

15. Lambton 

16. Lanark 


4,015 00 
3,983 00 
2,276 00 


17. Leeds and Grenville 

18. Lennox and Addington ... 


4,000 00 
2,130 00 


19. Lincoln 


1,487 00 



17<) 



THE REPORT OF THE 



iNo. 12 



Summary of Apportionment for 1904— Concluded. 



COUNTIES.— Con. 



20. Middlesex 

21. Norfolk 

22. Northumberland and Durham . . . 

23. Ontario 

24. Oxford .. 

25. Peel 

26. Perth 

27. Peterborough 

28. Prescott and Russell 

29. Prince Edward 

30. Renfrew 

31. Simcoe 

32. Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 

33. Victoria 

34. Waterloo 

35. Welland 

36. Wellington 

37. Wentworth 

38. York 



39. 



Total . . 
Districts : — 

(a) Algoma 

(b) Muskoka 
• (c) Nipissing. 

(d) Parry Sound 

(e) Rainy River 



(f) Thunder Bay 
Exclusive of the 
towns and vil- 
ages which appear 
in the general 
list 



Total 

GRAND TOTALS. 

Counties 

Cities 

Towns 

Villages 

Districts 

Totals 



Public- 
Schools. 



$ ( 
4,904 00 
2,444 00 
4,693 00 
3,256 00 
3,377 00 
1,855 00 
3,290 00 
2,225 00 
2,040 00 
1,517 00 
3,831 00 
5,866 00 
5,452 00 
2,375 00 
2,415 00 
1,881 00 
3,573 00 
2,696 00 
4 S 92G 00 



$116,991 00 



38,800 00 



38,800 00 



$116,991 00 
49,165 00 
35,995 00 
13,563 00 
38,800 00 



Separate 
Schools. 



S < 

111 00 

46 00 

79 00 

60 00 



13 00 

144 00 

21 00 

1,925 00 



1,200 00 



1,200 00 



$6,759 00 
12,327 00 

6,236 00 
993 00 

1,200 00 



Total . 



337 00 
124 CO 
497 00 


264 00 


117 00 

6 00 

33 00 


$6,759 00 



5,015 00 
2,490 00 
4,772 00 
3,316 00 
3,377 00 
1,868 00 
3,434 00 
2,246 00 
3,965 00 
1,517 00 
4,168 00 
5,990 00 
5,949 00 
2,375 00 
2,679 00 
1,881 00 
3,690 00 
2,702 <0{0> 
4,960 00 



$123,750 00 



40,000 00 



40,000 GO 



123,750 00 
61,492 CO 
42,231 00 

14,556 00 
40,000 00 



$254,514 00 



$27,515 00 



$282,029 CO 



EXAMINATIONS, 1905. PHESCEIBED TEXTS. 

District Certificate. 
Scott, The Lady of the Lake. 

Part II. — Junior Leaving. 

English : 

Longfellow, Evangeline, The Day is Done, The Old Clock on the 
Stairs, The Fire of Driftwood, Kesignation, The Warden of the Cinque 
Ports, The Bridge, A Gleam of Sunshine. 

Wordsworth, "Three years she grew in sun and shade," ".She was a 
Phantom of delight," "There is a Flower, the lesser Celandine " To a Sky- 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 177 



lark, ("Ethereal minstrel ! pilgrim of the sky ! "), The Green Linnet, to 
the Cuckoo, "With little here to do or see." 
Shakespeare, Macbeth. 

Latin : 

Cornelius Nepos, Lives of Themistocles and Aristides ; Cesar, Bellum 
Gallicum, Bk. IV. (omitting Chap. 17), and Bk. V., Chaps. 1-23 ; Vergil, 
^Eneid, Bk. II. (1-505.) 

Greek : 

Selections from Xenophon, Anabasis I, in White's Beginner's Greek 
Book (pp. 304-428), with the Exercises thereon; Homer, Iliad I. 

German : 

Grimm, Rotkappchen ; Andersen Wie's der Alte macth, Des neue 
Kleid, Venedig Rothschild, Der Bar ; Ertl, . Himmelsschlussel ; Trom- 
mel, Das eiserne Kreuz ; Baumbach, Nicotiana, Der Goldbaum ; Heine, 
Lorelei, Du bist wie eine Blume ; Uhland, Schafer's Sonntagslied, Das 
Schloss am Meer ; Chamisso, Das Schloss Boncourt ; Claudius, Die 
Sterne, Der Eiese Goliath ; Goethe, Mignon, Erlkonig, Der Sanger ; 
Schiller, Der Jungling am Bache. 

Leander, Traumereien, pp. 45-90 (selected by Van Daell.) 

French : 

. Lamennais, Paroles d'un croyant, Chaps. VII. and XVII. ; Perrault, 
le Maitre Chat ou le Chat Botte; Dumas, Un nez gele, and la Pipe de Jean 
Bart ; Alphonse Daudet, la Derniere classe, and la Chevre de M. Seguin ; 
Legouve, la Patte de dindon ; Pouvillon, Hortibus ; Loti, Chagrin d'un 
vieux forcat ; Moliere, l'Avare, Acte III. sc. 5 (Est-ce a votre cocher . 
. sous la mienne); Victor Hugo, Waterloo, Chap. IX.; Rouget de 
L'Isle, la Marseillaise; Arnault, la Eeuille; Chateaubriand, l'Exile; 
Theopiiile Gautier, la Cbimere ; Victor Hugo, Extase ; Lamartine, 
I' Automne; De Musset, Tristesse; Sully Prudhomme, le Vase brise; La 
Fontaine, le Chene et le Roseau. 

Erckmann-Chatrain, Contes fantastiques, pp. 3-69, 121-138, ed by E. 
S. Joynes (Holt & Co.) 

Senior Leaving. 
English : 

Longfellow, Evangeline, The Day is Done, The Old Clock on the 
Stairs, The Eire of Driftwood, Resignation, The Warden of the Cinque 
Ports, The Bridge, A Gleam of Sunshine. 

Wordsworth, "Three years she grew in sun and shade," "She was a 
Phantom of delight," "There is a Flower, the lesser Celandine," To a Sky- 
lark ("Ethereal minstrel! pilgrim of the sky;"), The Green Linnet, To 
the Cuckoo, "With little here to do or see." 

Shakespeare : Macbeth, Richard II. 

Latin : 

Cornelius Nepos, Lives of Themistocles and Aristides ; C.es\r. 
Bellum Gallicum, Book IV., omitting Chap. 17 and Book V., Chaps. 
1-23 ; Virgil, JEneid II., lines 1-505 ; Horace, Odes I. and II.: Ctcepo, 
In Catilinam I. and III., IV. 

Greek \ 

Xenophon, Anabasis I, ('Chaos. I. -VIII.); Homer, Iliad I., Odyssev 
XIX.; Lucian, Charon (Heitland) ; Lysias, Contra Eratoshenem. 



178 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



French : 

Lamennais, Paroles d'un croyant, Chaps. VII. and XVII. ; Per- 
rault, le Maitre Chat on le Chat Botte; Dumas, Un nez gele, and la Pipe 
de Jean Bart ; Alphonse Daudet, la Derniere classe, and la Chevre de M. 
Seguin ; Legouve, la Patte de dindon ; Pouvillon, Hortibus ; Loti, Cha- 
grin d'un vieux forcat ; Moliere, l'Avare, Acte III., sc 5 (Est-ce a votre 
cocher . . . sous la mienne) ; Victor Hugo, Waterloo, Chap. IX.; 
Rouget de l'Isle, la Marseillaise ; Arnault, la Feuille ; Chateau- 
briand, 1'Exile, Theophile Gautier, la Chimere; Victor Hugo, Extase; 
Lamartine, rAutomne; De Musset, Tristesse; Sully Prudhomme, le Vase 
brise; La Fontaine, le Chene et el Roseau. 

Erckmann-Chatrain. Contes fantastiques, pp. 3-69, 121-138, ed. E. 
S. Joynes (Holt & Co.) 

Francois Coppee, Contes Choises, ed. by Margaret F. Skeat (Macmil- 
lan). 

German : 

Grimm, Rotappchen ; Andersen, Wie's der Alte macht, Das neue 
Kleid, Venedig, Rothschild, Der Bar ; Ertl, Himmelsschussel ; Frommel, 
Das eiserne Kreuz; Baumbach, Nicotiana, Der Goldbaum ; Heine, Lorelei, 
Du bist wie eine Blume ; Uhland, Schafer's Sonntagslied, Das Schloss am 
Meer ; Chamisso, Das Schloss Boncourt ; Claudius, Die Sterne, Der 
Riese Goliath ; Goethe, Mignon, Erlkonig, Der Sanger ; Schiller, Der 
Jiingling am Bache. 

Leander, Traumereien, pp. 45 to 90 (selected by Van Daell). 

Baumbach, Der Schwiegersohn ; Elz, Er ist nicht eifersuchtig ; Wi- 
chert, Post Festum. 

Toronto, June, 1904. 



TEXT-BOOKS AUTHORIZED FOR USE IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 
HIGH SCHOOLS, AND TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

Approved July, 1904. 

) 

• 1. The text-books named in Schedule "A" shall be the authorized 
text-books for Public Schools. Pupils taking any optional subject in the 
Public School course may use the text-book authorized in such optional 
subject. The text-books in French and German are authorized only for 
schools where the French or German language prevails and where the 
Trustees, with the approval of the Inspector, require French or German to 
be taught in addition to English. Text-books marked "optional" shall be 
introduced into the Public Schools only by resolution of the Board of 
Trustees. Books authorized in the Lower School of the High School course 
may be used by pupils taking the corresponding subjects of Continuation 
classes. 

2. The text-books named in Schedule "B" shall be th£ only authoriz- 
ed text-books in High Schools and Collegiate Institutes for the course of 
study prescribed in the Lower and Middle Schools. Books authorized for 
use in the Public Schools may be used in the Lower School and it is recom- 
mended that so far as the Principal may deem desirable, these books be 
used for the first year instead of the corresponding High School books. 
For the second special course or imore advanced work in the Commercial de- 
partment, any books recommended by the Principal may be used, with the 
approval of the High School Board. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



179 



3. The text-books named in Schedule "C" shall be the authorized 
text-books for Model Schools, Normal Schools and the Ontario Normal Col- 
lege. Only such books shall be used by the teachers-in-training as may 
be ordered by the Principal. 

4. Any text-books used in any school before the 1st July, in 1904, and 
recommended by resolution of the Trustees to be continued in use, shall be 
deemed as authorized in such school until further notice. The vertical or 
slanting copy books heretofore authorized, and published by the Rose Pub- 
lishing Company, may be used in any Public School. 

5. For religious instruction, either the Sacred Scriptures, or the 
Scripture Readings adopted by the Education Department, shall be. used as 
prescribed by the Regulations of the Education Department. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. (SCHEDULE A.) 



First Reader, Part I., or A Modern Phonic Primer, Part I. (Morang) or The 

Public School Phonic Reader, Part I $0 10 

First Reader, Part II., or Public School Phonic Primer, Part II., or A Modern 

Phonic Primer, Part II. (Morang) 15 

Second Reader 20 

Third Reader . . 30 

Fourth Reader 40 

High School Reader 50 

Public School Arithmetic 25 

Public School Algebra and Euclid 25 

Public School Geography, or Morang's Modern Geography 75 

Our Home and its Surroundings (for Junior Classes) 40 

Public School Grammar 25 

Morang's Modern English Grammar i 60 

Public School History of England and Canada 30 

History of the Dominion of Canada (Fifth Form) 50 

Public School Drawing Course, each number ..... 05 

Public School Physiology and Temperance 25 

Public School Copy Book 07 

Practical Speller 25 

Public School Bookkeeping 25 

Public School Agriculture 30 

Public School Domestic Science (optional) 50 



French-English Readers 



First Reader, Part I. 
First Reader, Part II. 

Second Reader 

Third Reader 



10 
15 
25 
35 



German-English Readers. 



Ann's First German Book . . 

Ahn's Second German Book 

Ahn's Third German Book . 

Ahn's Fourth German Book 

Ahn's First German Reader 



25 
45 
45 
50 
50 



HIGH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES. (SCHEDULE B.) 



English. 



High School Reader 

High School English Grammar 

High School English Composition 

Elementary English Composition (Sykes) 
High School Composition from Models . 

15 E. 



50 

75 
50 
40 
75 



180 'I HE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



History and Geography 

High School Geography (Chase) $1 00 

Morang's Modern Geography 75 

High School History of England and Canada 65 

Wrong's "The British Nation" ; ' 1 00 

Myers' Ancient History — Greece and Rome — Can. Ed'n 75 

Botsford's Ancient History for Beginners (Morang) 1 00 

History of the Dominion of Canada — Clement 50 

Mathematics. 

High School Arithmetic 60 

Arithmetic for High Schools, De Lury 60 

High School Algebra 75 

Elements of Algebra, McLellan 75 

Elementary Plane Geometery, Baker 50 

High School Euclid, J. S. McKay, or by A. C. McKay and R. A. Thompson 

(Books I., II., III., 50 cents) '. 75 



Classics. 



First Latin Book and Reader 1 00 

Primary Latin Book and Reader 1 00 

White's First Green Book 1 25 

High School Beginner's Greek Book 1 50 



Moderns. 



High School French Grammar and Reader 1 00 

High School German Grammar and Reader 1 00 



Science 



High School Physical Science, Part I., 50 cents; Part II 75 

High School Botany, Part II 60 

High School Chemistry 50 



Hormal Schools. 

Lectures on Teaching, Fitch. 



60 



Bookkeeping and Drawing 

High School Bookkeeping 

High School Drawing Course, each number 10 

Cadet Drill. 

High School Cadet Drill Manual (optional) 40 

TRAINING SCHOOLS. (SCHEDULE C.) 
County Model Schools. 

School Management, Millar * °° 

Methods in Teaching, Edited by Tilley 1 50 

Public School Physiology and Temperance ° 25 

New Psychology, (Chapters 4, 5 and 6 omitted) Gordy 1 25 

Steps in the Phonic System, Cullin & Niven 050 

Elementary Phonetics, Burt .' ° ^ 5 

Elementary Treatise on Arithmetic, Taylor 50 

Mental Arithmetic, McLellan & Ames 30 

Algebraical Exercises, Barnes '• ° o0 

Introductory Geometery, McLean ' 50 

A Guide to Nature Study, Crawford ° 90 



1 00 



School Management, Millar 1 00 

15a E. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 181 



Normal Scliooh.- Continued. 

Educational Reformers, Quick 

Applied Psychology, McLellan 

First Year at School, Sinclair 

High School Cadet Drill Manual 

Hints on Teaching Arithmetic, McLean. 
Puhlic School Domestic Science 



$1 50 


1 00 


50 


40 


50 


50 


1 00 


50 


1 00 


1 50 



Ontario Normal College. 

Applied Psychology, McLellan 

Education, Spencer 

School Management, Millar 

School Management, Landon 

Educational Reformers, Quick 1 50 

High School Cadet Drill Manual 40 

Physical Culture, Houghton 50 

Physical Education, MacLaren, Part II., sections II. and III 2 GO 

TEACHERS' READING COURSE FOR 1905. (SCHEDULE D.) 

Science of Education (Sinclair) 1 00 

A New School Management (Seeley) 1 25 

Common Sense Didactics (Sabin) 1 25 



, LIST OF APPARATUS. 

Required to Perform the Experiments in the Elementary Science of 

the Fifth Form Public School Course, and of the 

Lower School of the High School. 

Probable 
Cost- 
1 Metric Scale, one foot long. The ordinary School Rules graduated in 

inches and centimeters will answer $0 02 

1 Metric Stick 50 

1 Dissected Litre Block 2 00 

1 Test Tube on Foot 10 

1 Pinch-Cock 15 

1 Burette, Mohr's, 50 C. C. graduated in tenths 2 00 

1 Measuring Cylinder, 100 C. C. graduated 80 

3 Beakers, different sizes 55 

1 Air Pump and Receiver 10 00 

1 Elastic Rubber Balloon. A toy balloon answers well 10 

1 Pendulum Bob 25 

1 Tuning Fork, Simple Form 20 

2 Bar Magnets 50 

1 Physical balance, with set of Metric Weights ... 8 30 

1 Spirit Lamp or Bunsen Burner 40 

1 Caliper, Simple Form 50 

1 Glass Battery Jar, 9 in. deep, 8 in. diam 50 

1 Mortar and Pestle 35 

\ Pound Glass Tubing, assorted sizes 50 

2 Thistle Tubes Each 15c. 30 

1 Transmission of Pressure Apparatus 75 

1 Archimedes Principle 1 75 

1 Globe for weighing air . . 3 00 

1 Barometer Tube, heavy glass 50 

1 Mariotte's Law Tube 1 50 

1 Retort Stand, (two rings) 50 

3 Small Florence Flasks with perforated rubber corks to fit 45 

1 Florence Flask with wide mouth 25 

1 Hydrometer Jar 45 

1 Rubber Cork with two holes to fit Florence Flask with large mouth 15 

1 Weighted Wooden Prism, 1 square Centimeter in sections 25 

2 Grenet Cells Each 2.50 5 00 



182 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



List of Apparatus. — Continued. 



1 Ball and ring 

Compound Bar ,. 

1 Thermometer, graduated in both Centigrade 

1 Calorimeter 

1 Conductometer 

1 Tripod 

1 Horse-shoe Magnet 

1 Compass 

1 Dipping Needle 

1 Decomposition of Water Apparatus 

1 Bar, Soft Iron (round, 6 in. long) 

1 Electric Bell, (small) 

1 Plane Mirror, (small) 

1 Concave Mirror 

1 Prism 



and Fahrenheit Degrees. 



Lift Pump, Glass Model 

Force Pump 

Hydraulic Press, Glass Model 

Pneumatic Trough 



Glass Bottles. (Pickle bottles will answer) '0 



Glass Slips, 2 inches square, 

Filter Funnel 

Test Tube Cleaners 

Doz Test Tubes 6 in. x § in. 

Evaporating Dish 

Hand Glass Test Tubes 

Test Tube Rack 

Test Tube Clamps, (wire) .. 
Reagent Bottles 4 oz 



to cover mouth of bottles 



with 3 perforated rubber corks to fit. 



SUNDRIES. 



Probable 
Copt 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

2 00 
1-50 
40 
25 

25 
2 50 

1 50 

20 

1 00 

25 

1 50 

50 

1 25 
1 25 

. 2 00 
40 
10 
05 
10 
20 
50 
20 
30 
25 
30 
50 



Laice stick 



File, 3 cornered 

Rubber Tubing for connections •••• 

Sheet Rubber Per "«• ( , foot 

Wire Gauze 

Insulated Copper Wire 

Sealing Wax 

Iceland Spar 

Mica ■. 

Sheet Zinc and Sheet Copper, (Pair Elements) 

2 Small Vises for clamping wires 

Piano Wire, 1 spool 

Lodestone, . small 

Mercury, 2 lbs 

CHEMICALS. 



10 

50 

25 

15 

10 

25 

65 

10 

15 

80 

10 

50 

2 00 



I lb. Zince, granulated, \ lb- Iron filings. 
§ lb. Pot. Chlorate, \ lb. Manganese Dioxide. 
\ lb. Ammon. Chloride, \ lb. Lime. 
1 lb. Marble, (Limestone will answer). 

1 oz. Yellow Phosphorus, 2 oz. Red Oxide of Mercury. 

2 oz. Caustic Potash, 8 oz. Limewater. 

1 Book each, red and blue Litmus Paper. 

6 oz. each of Hydrochloric, Nitric, and Sulphuric Acids. 

2 oz. Roll Sulphur, 1 Package Filter paper, (round). 

I gal. Battery Fluid for Grenet cells, 6 oz. Liquor Ammonia. 



Botany and Zoology. 
For the work in Botany and Zoology it is desirable that each 



Pupil 
should have ^pocket magnifier (30-50' cents). A compound microscope 
($11.00) should also form part of the school equipment for this work. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 183 



These, together with a dozen glass slips and cover glasses, and a couple of 
needles mounted in wooden handles will be found to be all that is necessary 
for the course. Breeding cages for observing the development of insects 
may be made from waste crayon boxes or soap boxes by covering one side 
cr end with mosquito netting or a pane of glass. 

General. 

A small cupboard should be provided for storing apparatus and chemi- 
cals, and a simple laboratory table for carrying out experiments should be 
in every school where there is no laboratory. 

Toronto, August, 1904. 



COURSES FOE COMMERCIAL AND ART SPECIALISTS. 

Reg. 52. Any person who passes the examination in the subjects set 
forth in Circular No. 2 — Courses for Commercial and Art Specialists — 
(each paper being valued at 100, and the standard being 40 per cent, in 
each and 60 per cent, of the aggregate, with 75 per cent, in honors), and 
who is holder of a High School Assistant's certificate shall be entitled to 
an Interim Commercial or Art Specialist's certificate. 

After the examinations of 1905 the following shall be the details of 
each course. 

I. COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

(i) Book-keeping. 

Theoretical Book-keeping. Single and double entry ; general mer- 
chandising, commission business, manufacturing ; single proprietor, part- 
nership and corporation accounting, and changing from one form of owner- 
ship to another ; plant, labor, material, and departmental accounts ; prac- 
tical treatment of such accounts as bank, discount, freight, suspense, bad 
debts, depreciation, etc.,' columnar cash books, journals, etc., and the var- 
ious forms of books necessary for the different kinds of business ; manufac- 
turing, trading, and profit and loss accounts, balance sheets ; statements of 
income and expenditure, and of receipts and disbursements. (One paper.) 

Practical Book-keeping. Making the proper records and financial 
statements from given data. This may take the form of separate ques- 
tions and problems, or of a set covering a certain period of time (One 
paper). 

(ii) Penmanship. 

Theory and practice of penmanship ; position and movement ; princi- 
ples of letter formation; graceful, legible business writing; ledger head- 
ings, figures, marking and engrossing (One paper). 

(iii) Mercantile Arithmetic. 

Interest, discount, annuities certain,, sinking funds, formation of in- 
terest and annuity tables, the application of logarithms, stocks and invest- 
ments, partnership settlements, partial payments, equating or averaging 
accounts, exchange, practical measurements, and the metric system. (One 
paper). 



184 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(iv.) General Commercial Knowledge. 

Business Papers. Receipts, releases, promissory notes, .chattel notes, 
lien notes, instalment notes, drafts, bills of exchange, orders, due hills, de- 
posit slips, checks, bank drafts, draft requisition deposit, receipts, bank 
pass books, bills, invoices, credit invoices, accounts, monthly statements, 
warehouse receipts, bills of lading, freight bills, proxies, power of attorneys, 
agreements, bonds, debentures, leases, instalment scrips, stock certificates, 
stock transfers. 

Business Laws, Banking, etc. Negotiable paper, indorsement, accep- 
tance, discharge, dishonor, protest, negotiability and assignability, accom- 
modation paper, statute of limitations, statute of frauds, interest, money, 
payments, collection of accounts, partnership, joint stock companies, insur- 
ance; liability as partner, shareholder, director, agent, indorser, etc.; con- 
tracts — kinds, parties to, consideration, etc.; property, real and personal ; 
mortgages, chattel and real estate; guarantee and suretyship; shipper and 
carrier ; mechanics' lien ; landlord and tenant — rights, duties and liabili- 
ties ; principal and agent — relation to each other and to third parties ; mas- 
ter and servant — relations, rights, duties, and liabilities ; wills and succes- 
sion duties ; copyrights, trade marks, industrial designs, patent rights — 
purpose and legal requirements ; banking — organization, business, note is- 
sue, redemption fund, crossed checks, etc.; balance of trade — meaning, and 
effect on an exchange. 

Statutory Requirements. Relating to companies, partnerships, insol- 
vency, and winding up acts. (One paper). 

(v.) Auditing. » 

Object, scope, and advantages of an audit ; preliminary steps; instruc- 
tions to the book-keeper before an audit ; continuous and complete audits ; 
relation to prior audits ; vouchers ; trial balances and balanced books ; in- 
dividual, partnership, and company ownership ; methods of accounting ; 
different classes of audits, as commercial, mining, financial ; valuation and 
verification of assets and liabilities ; depreciation, discounts, bad and 
doubtful debts, reserve funds, etc. ; preliminary expenses, directors' fees, 
etc. ; foreign exchange ; nature of profits ; forms of accounts and balance 
sheets ; auditors' reports, recommendations, and certificates. (One paper). 

(vi.) Economics. 

The principles of production, distribution, exchange and consumption; 
value and price ; land, labor, and capital ; rent, wages, and interest ; mon- 
opolies, etc. (One paper). 

(vii.) Stenography. 

Theory. .The principles of Phonography by Isaac Pitman. 

Practice. Writing from dictation at a speed of sixty words per min- 
ute, and accurate transcription into long hand at a speed of twelve words 
per minute; the dictated matter to comprise business correspondence and 
legal documents. (Two papers). 

(viii.) History of Commerce, and Transportation. 

Ancient and mediaeval commerce ; commercial significance of the 
great geographical discoveries of the fifteenth century ; the Dutch com- 
mercial ascendancy ; struggle of the English, French, and Dutch for the 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 18i 



first place in commerce ; the English industrial revolution ; commercial 
significance of the Napoleonic wars ; England's industrial and commercial 
supremacy ; French industry and commerce since the overthrow of Napo- 
leon ; the German Empire and its commercial position ; recent economic 
growth of Russia ; the Balkan States, and the commercial position of South 
America, Africa, Asia and Oceania. The growth of commerce and the 
distribution agencies of Canada and the United States ; markets and public 
carriers ; growth of the factory system and its relation to agriculture and 
the development of transportation facilities ; relation of waterways to rail- 
ways and the distribution of the waterways of the country and their effect on 
domestic commerce. (One paper). 

Note. — The examinations for commercial specialists will be held in 
July at the same centres as the other departmental examinations. 

Books of Reference Recommended. 

Canadian Accountant. J. W. Johnston, Belleville. 

Canadian Standard Bookkeeping. J. W. Westervelt, London. 

Joint Stock Company Accounts. D. Hoskins, Toronto. 

Accounting in Theory and Practice. Geo. Lisle. Wm. Green & Co., 
Edinburgh. 

Penman's Art Journal, (commence with September No.) 203 Broad- 
way, New York. 

The Theory of Finance. Geo. D. King, C. & E. Layton, Farringdon 
St., London, E.C., Eng. 

Digest of Canadian Mercantile Law. W. H. Anger, Toronto. 

Shareholders' Manual. J. D. Warde, Toronto. 

Assignments Act. Cassels. Hunter, Rose & Co., Toronto. 

Auditing (chapters 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8). L. R. Dicksee. Gee & Co., Lon- 
don, E.C., Eng. 

Elements of Political Economy. James Bonar. John Murray, Alber- 
marle St., London, Eng. 

Shorthand Instructor. Sir Isaac Pitman. The Copp, Clark Co., To- 
ronto. 

The History of Commerce in Europe. H. de B. Gibbins. The Mac- 
Millan Co., London, Eng. 

Note. — For The "Winding-up Act, see R. S. 0. 

II. ART COURSE. 

(i) Freehand Drawing. 

With pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, and black crayon. 

Drawing of common objects from observation and from memory. 

Imaginative Drawing. Illustration of stories. 

Principles of Perspective. 

Outdoor sketching. Sketching through school windows. 

Drawing from the cast and the human figure. 

Rapir memory sketches of figures in motion. 

Composition. 

Representation of flat and relief maps. (Two papers). 

(ii.) Clay Modelling. 

Common objects. Relief maps. Modelling from the cast. 



186 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(iii.) Color Drawing. 

Suggestion of form with brush and ink ; representation of common ob- 
jects in monochrome tints ; primary, secondary, and tertiary colors ; 
proper combination of colors ; watercolor and colored crayon drawings of 
common objects ; outdoor sketching ; sketching through the school windows. 
(One paper.) 

(iv.) Industrial Design. 
In outline and color. 

Practical geometry as far as necessary for construction of designs ; 
principles of design and anatomy of patterns ; units of design adapted from 
practical and geometrical forms ; designs for floorcloths, wall paper,, book- 
covers, advertisements, etc. (One paper). 

(v.) Geometrical and Mechanical Drawing. 

Problems in practical geometry and perspective ; orthographic and^ iso- 
metric projection ; drawing from specifications ; simple machine drawing ; 
simple architectural drawing. (One paper). 

(vi.) Drawing on the Blackboard. 

With white chalk and colored crayons. 

Common objects : illustration of nature study, geography, etc. 

(vii.) History of Art. 

An outline of the origin and development of Architecture, Sculpture, 
and Painting, with some knowledge of the life and works of the great ar- 
tists of each of the leading periods. (One paper). ^ _ 

Note.— (1). — All the examinations for art specialists will be held in 
July at the Toronto Normal School. # % . ■ 

(2).— The examinations in clay modelling, in sketching, and m draw- 
ing on the blackboard will be practical. 

Books of Reference Recommended. 

Light and Shades. Cross. Ginn & Co., Boston. 

New Drawing Course. Vaughan. Nelson & Son, London., Eng. 

Clay Modelling. Holland. Ginn & Co., Boston. 

Manual of Clay Modelling. TJnwin. Longmans, Green & Co., Lon- 
don and New York. 

Elementary Brushwork Studies. Teats. Philip & Son, London, Ung. 

Brushwork Studies. Yeats. Philip & Son, London, Eng. 

Color Study. Cross. Ginn & Co., Boston. 

Design and the Making of Patterns. Hatton. Chapman & Hall, 
London, Eng., • 

Science and Art of Drawing. Spanton. The MacMillan Co. 

Perspective Drawing. Spanton. The MacMillan Co. 

Mechanical Drawing. Spanton. The MacMillan Co. 

Blackboard Drawing. Seaby. Nelson & Son. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 187 



Blackboard Drawing. Whitney. Davis Press, North Scituate, Mass. 
Architectural Drawing. Edminster. The Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

History of Art. DeForest. Dodd, Mead & Co., New York. 

Toronto, September, 1904. 



DEPARTMENTAL INSTRUCTIONS. 
High School Entrance Examination, 1905. 

1. The High School Entrance examinations for 1905 will begin on 
Wednesday, the 28th of June, at 8.45 a.m., and will be conducted under the 
provisions of Section 41 of the High School Act and Sections 23-28 of the 
Regulations, subject to the instructions herein contained. 

2. Candidates who purpose writing at the examination must notify 
the Public School Inspector before the 1st of May. 

3. A teacher who has pupils writing at the High School Entrance ex- 
amination, shall not be eligible to act as an Examiner or Presiding Officer 
where such pupils are writing. 

4. When the County Council recommends the holding of an exam- 
ination at any place other than the High School, the Presiding Officer 
shall be paid the sum of $3 per diem, and travelling expenses for conduct- 
ing such examination, and the Examiners shall be allowed the sum of $1 
per candidate for reading the answer papers. It shall be lawful for the 
County Treasurer to pay all the expenses of such examination on the certi- 
ficate of the County Inspector. 

Selections for Memorization. 

Ontario Fourth Reader. , 

1905.— VII. Boadicea; XIV. Lament of the Irish Emigrant; XXIX. 
For a' That and a' That ; XLVI. Lead Kindly Light ; LIV. Lochinvar ; 
LXXXIII. The Influence of Beauty; Sonnet— Night (page 302); CV. 
Elegy, Written in a Country Churchyard. 

1906.— II. I'll Find a Way or Make It; VII. Boadicea ; XXI. Oft in 
the Stilly Night ; XXXV. Resignation ; XL. Ring out Wild Bells ; L. 
The Prairies ; LVI. The Honest Man ; LXXXII. The Ocean. 

Selections for Memorization. 

Canadian Catholic Fourth Reader. 

1905.— VI. Lead, Kindly Light ; X. Flow Gently, Sweet Afton ; 
XXXV. Step by Step ; LI. Song of the River ; LIII. As I Came Down from 
Lebanon ; CI. Inscription for a Spring ; CXV. The Bells of Shandon ; 
CXVIII. Elegy, Written in a Countrv Churchyard. 

1906.— VI. Lead Kindly Light ; XXVII. Under the Violets ; 
LXXXI. The Angelus; LXXV. To the Dandelion; CXVI. Veni Creator; 
XCIV. The Combat; LXXXV. A Psalm of Life; LXXXIII. Waterloo. 



188 THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Duties of Inspector. 

5. The Inspector shal] notify the Department not later than the 3rd 
day of May in each year of the number of persons desiring to be examined 
at any High School or other authorized place within his jurisdiction. 

6. In any city or town forming a separate inspectoral division, the In- 
spector or Inspectors of such city or town shall preside at the examina- 
tions, and in conjunction with the Board of Examiners for such city or town 
shall^read the papers and report to the Department. 

7. In counties in which more High Schools than one are situated the 
Inspector for the county shall elect at which High School he will preside, 
and shall notify the Department of the choice he makes, and in each of the 
other High Schools the Principal of the High School shall preside. 

8. In the case of examinations affiliated with a High School, the In- 
spector, within whose district such affiliated examinations are held, shall 
appoint Presiding Officers, who shall be teachers in actual service, notice 
of which shall be sent to the Education Department ; and such Inspector, 
together with the Examiners of the High School with which the examina- 
tion is affiliated, shall be the Board of Examiners in all such cases. 

9. Where from the number of candidates, or any other cause, addi- 
tional Presiding Officers are required, the Inspector shall make such ap- 
pointments as are necessary, preference being given to the other members 
of the Board of Examiners. 

10. Where more examinations than one are held in an inspectoral di- 
vision, the papers will be sent by the Education Department to the Inspec- 
tor or the Presiding Officer, as the case may be. 

11. The parcel containing the examination papers shall not be opened 
till the morning of the examination day, nor shall any envelope containing 
the papers in any subject be opened until the time appointed in the time- 
table for the examination in such subject. 

Duties of Presiding Officers. 

12. To be in attendance at the place appointed for the examination at 
least fifteen minutes before the time fixed for the first subject, and to 
see that the candidates are supplied with the necessary stationery and 
seated so far apart as to afford reasonable security against copying. 

13. To open the envelope containing the papers in each subject in 
full view of the candidates, at the time prescribed, and to place one paper 
on each candidate's desk. 

14. To exercise proper vigilance over the candidates to prevent 
copying, and to allow no candidate to communicate with another, nor per- 
mit any person except another Presiding Officer to enter the rp^om during 
the examination. 

15. To see that the candidates promptly cease writing at the proper 
time, fold and endorse their papers properly, and in every respect comply 
with the instructions herein contained. 

16. To submit the answers of the candidates to the Examiners accord- 
ing to the instructions from the Board. 

Duties of Candidates. 

17. Every candidate should be in attendance at least fifteen minutes 
before the time at which the examination is to begin, and shall occupv the 
seat allotted by the Presiding Officer. Any candidate desirino- to 'move 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 189 



from his allotted place or to leave the room shall first obtain permission 
from the Presiding Officer to do so. Any candidate leaving shall not re- 
turn during the examination in the subject then in hand. 

18. Every candidate shall write his answers on one side only of the 
paper, and number each answer. He shall arrange the sheets numeri- 
cally, according to the question, and fold .them once crosswise, endorsing 
them with his name, the name of the subject, and the name of the place 
at which he is examined. A paper shall not be returned to a candidate 
after being placed in the hands of the Presiding Officer. 

19. Any candidate who is found copying from another or allowing 
another to copy from him, or who brings into the examination room any 
book, note or paper having any reference to the subject on which he is 
writing, shall be required by the Presiding Officer to leave the room, and 
his paper and the papers of all the guilty parties shall be cancelled. 

Duties of Examiners. 

20. The papers of the different candidates shall be so distributed that 
the same examiner shall read and value the answers in the same subject 
throughout. 

21. Marks are to be deducted for mis-spelt words and for want of neat- 
ness as indicated in regulation 27. 

22 — (a) The reports of the examiners are to be sent (by mail) to the 
Education Department on or before the »25th day of July by the Public 
School Inspector. 

(b) The bag which contains the question papers is to be returned to the 
Department (charges prepaid)a£ the same time as the reports are sent. 

(c) The answer papers of candidates, unless when specially requested, 
are not to be forwarded to the Department, but are to be retained by the 
Inspector until the 1st day of October, after which no case is to be re- 
considered. 

(d) The Inspector shall issue a certificate to each candidate who passes 
the High School Entrance examination. 

TIME TABLE. 

High School Entrance. 

First Day. 

A.M. 8.45 Reading Instructions. 

9.00—11.00 Composition. 

11.10—12.40 Geography. 

P.M. 2.00—4.00 English Grammar. 

4.10—4.40 Spelling. 

Second Day. 

A.M. 9.00—11.00 Arithmetic. 

11.10—12.00 Writing. 

P.M. 2.00—4.00 Reading (Written). 

Reading (oral) may be taken on the above days at such hours as 
mav suit the convenience of the examiners. 
* Toronto, October, 1904. 



1 ;, THE REPORT OF THE No. \2 



EXAMINATIONS. 

ISTRUCTIONS TO PRESIDING OFFICERS, 1905. 

Presiding Officers are requested to peruse carefully the following 

instructions and see that they are fully carried out : — 

(1) Each Inspector or such other persons as may be appointed by the 
Minister, shall receive from the Department or the Inspector, the examina- 
tion papers, and shall thereupon be responsible for the safe keeping of the 
bag and its contents until the examination is concluded. 

(2) On the receipt of the bag containing the question papers the Pre- 
siding Officer will see that the seal is intact. The bag can be opened by 
breaking the wire close to the seal, and when opened the names and num- 
bers of the envelopes containing the question-papers should be verified with 
the time-table. 

(3) The Presiding Officer will satisfy himself that all necessary ar- 
rangements are made by the School Board in due time for the examination. 
If the trustees have not placed a clock in each room used for examination 
purposes the Presiding Officer shall have power to hire the use of one for 
each room during the time required for the examination, and charge the 
same as part of the expenses of the examination. 

(4) The Presiding Officer shall, if there is sufficient accommodation 
and if sufficient papers have been received, admit candidates who through 
some oversight did not send their applications to the inspector. The names 
of such candidates are to be entered in the Supplementary List, (Form No. 
181), specially provided, with such information as is required of the other 
candidates. This list and the required part of the fee with one dollar ad- 
ditional as provided, should be sent by the Presiding officer to the Educa- 
tion Department. The remainder of the fee should be sent to the Board 
that bears the expense of the examination. 

(5) The Presiding Officer shall exercise necessary vigilance at all 
times while the candidates are engaged, and he shall not give his atten- 
tion to any work other than that which .pertains to his duties as Presiding 
Officer. He shall take all necessary care to render it impossible for the 
instructions to candidates to be violated without his knowledge. This in- 
struction (5) is to be observed however small may be the number of candi- 
dates. 

(6) It is imperative that the regulations be enforced by the Presiding 
Officer and strictly observed by the candidates. In particular the exami- 
nation papers shall be distributed, and the answer papers collected punctu- 
ally at the time indicated in the time-table. The Presiding Officer has no 
authority to deviate from the official time-table. 

(7) (a) In the examination room, candidates, whether writing on the 
same subject or on different subjects, shall be seated at least five feet apart. 
All diagrams or maps having reference to the subject of examination shall 
be removed from the room, and books, papers, etc., removed from the 
desks ; all arrangements shall be completed, and the necessary stationery 
distributed at least fifteen minutes before the time appointed for the com- 
mencement of the first subject of the examination, and at last five minutes 
before, each other subject is begun. 

(b) The necessary stationery includes pens, blotting-paper, black ink 
of a uniform color, and the authorized examination answer books. Each 
candidate will receive one examination-book, at the beginning of each ex- 
amination period and other books as required during said period. No 



1904 .EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 11)1 



paper other than the examination-book must be distributed to the candi- 
dates, and no paper, examination-book or other book must be brought into 
the room by any candidate. (The Presiding Officer's attention is called es- 
pecially to the instructions as to the use of the examination-books on the 
first page thereof). 

(8) No person except the Presiding Officers and any necessary attend- 
ants shall be present with the candidates in any room at the examination ; 
and at least one Presiding Officer shall be present during the whole time 
of the examination in each room occupied by the candidates. A Presiding 
Officer shall not have in his charge at one time more than twenty-five can- 
didates. 

(9) The Presiding Officer shall, as indicated on the time-table, read to 
the candidates their duties drawing attention to any feature of them that 
may require special care during the examination, and emphasizing the di- 
rections to the candidates as to the manner in which the slips are to be at- 
tached to the envelopes. Great care should be taken in distributing the 
proper number and hind of envelopes and examination books and in ac- 
counting for such envelopes and examination-books as have been distribut- 
ed. 

(10) Punctually at the time appointed for the commencement of each 
examination, the Presiding Officer shall, in the examination room and in 
the presence of the candidates and other assistant Presiding Officers (if 
any), break the seal of the envelopes containing the examination papers, 
and give them to the assistant officers and to the candidates. The papers 
of only the subject or subjects required shall be opened at one time. Until 
the examination in the subject is over no examination papers, other than 
those which the candidates receive, shall be taken out of the room. 

(11) Punctually at the expiration of the time allowed, the Presiding 
Officer shall direct the candidates to stop writing, and cause them to hand 
in their answer papers immediately, duly fastened in the envelopes. 

(12) The Presiding Officer shall keep upon his desk the tally-list 
(check-list of candidates and subjects) and as each paper in any subject is 
handed in (and he should carefully note the superscription of the envelope 
— the subject and the candidate's name) he shall check the same by entering 
the figure "1" opposite the name of the candidate. The Presiding Offi- 
cer will enter the names of the candidates on the tally-list in the same order 
as found on the list of candidates, (Form 44). After the papers are hand- 
ed to the Presiding Officer he shall not allow the envelopes to be opened, 
and he shall be responsible for their safe keeping until transmitted to the 
Education Department. The answer-envelopes as well as the question-en- 
velopes should be kept in a safe, or in a room with the windows fastened 
and doors securely locked bv a cylinder lock. 

(1%) For special instructions regarding the examinations in Steno- 
graphy, Biology, etc., see the circular which is forwarded to each Presiding 
Officer prior to the examination. 

Instructions to Candidates. 

(To be read to candidates as indicated on time-table.) 

(1) Each candidate shall satisfy the Presiding Officer as to his per- 
sonal identity before the commencement of the first day's examination and 
any person detected in attempting to personate a candidate shall be report- 
ed to the Department. The Presiding Officer is authorized to refuse the 
application of any candidate who presents himself at any cer're other than 



192 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



that nearest his usual place of residence, unless the candidate's explanation 
of his course in so presenting himself is in every way satisfactory to the 
Presiding Officer. 

' (2) Candidates shall be in their alloted places' before the hour ap- 
pointed for the commencement of the examination. If a candidate be not 
present till after the appointed time, he shall not be allowed any additional 
time. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter 
the room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the 
examination. The Presiding Officer is authorized to refuse admission even 
within the hour if the candidate's explanation is in any sense unsatisfac- 
tory, or if he has reason to suspect collusion between the newly-admitted 
candidate and the other candidates. 

(3) A candidate shall not leave the room within one hour after the 
distribution of the examination papers in any subject ; and if he then 
leave he shall not be permitted to return during the examination on such 
subject. 

(4) Every candidate shall conduct himself in strict accordance with 
the instructions. Should he violate the instructions to be found in sections 
5 and 6 below or on the first page of the examination books; should he take 
into the room or have in his possession, in his desk, or on his person, any 
book, notes, paper, or anything from which he may derive assistance; 
should he talk, whisper, or make signs to another candidate ; should he leave 
his answers so exposed that any candidate may copy from him; should he 
give or receive aid or extraneous assistance of any kind whatsoever, his ex- 
amination will be cancelled and he will be debarred from presenting him- 
self at any Departmental examinations for two years. Should the Presid- 
ing Officer .obtain clear evidence of the violation of these instructions at 
the time of its occurrence he shall cause the candidate concerned at once to 
leave the room ; he shall strike his name from the list of candidates ; and 
he shall not permit him to return to the room during the remaining part 
of the examination. If, however, the evidence be not complete at the 
time, or be obtained after the close of the examination, the Presiding Offi- 
cer shall report the case to the Department. 

(5) Every candidate shall write the name of the subject of examina- 
tion very distinctly at the top of each page of his examination book. If 
he write his name or any distinguishing mark on his examination-book, or 
if he tear any paper from this book, or if he insert in this book any matter 
not pertinent to the examination, or if he use any paper or book or ink 
other than that provided, his examination may be cancelled. 

(6) The candidate shall write his answers and full solutions on the 
ruled sides of the leaves of his examination-book or books (if more than one 
be needed, he may use the unruled sides in preparing the answers in rough. 
He shall fold his examination book (or books) once across, place it in the en- 
velope provided by the Department, seal the envelope, write on the outside 
of the envelope the subject of examination only, and on the slip provided, 
his name in full (surname preceding) and then securely fasten the slip to 
the envelope, as instructed by the Presiding Officer. Candidates should 
see that their answers are placed in the proper envelopes. Scholarships 
and Honour Matriculation Candidates should designate their answers 
"Pass" or "Honour" according to the papers taken. 

(7) Candidates for the Junior or Senior Teachers' Examination who 
take extra matriculation papers for the purpose of matriculation standing 
should place their answers in matriculation envelopes and the Presiding 
Officer shall enter their names (if this has not already been done) on the 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 193 



matriculation Tally List. Parts A and B of the Matriculation History 
and Experimental Science papers are to be put in separate envelopes. 

Candidates are also reminded that the Presiding Officer is not allow- 
ed to make any explanation or other statement regarding the probable 
meaning of any question or to give any advice as to what question should 
be answered by the candidates or how any question should be answered. 

(8) Should any error appear to have been made in any question no 
attention shall be drawn to it during the time of examination by either the 
Presiding Officer or any of the candidates. Candidates may, however, at 
the end of the examination period submit the matter to the Presiding Offi- 
cer who, if he considers it necessary, will report on the matter to the De- 
partment at the close of the examination. 

Reports, etc. 

(1) The Presiding Officer shall report to the Education Department 
at the close of the examination in the "remarks" column of the Diagram 
Blank, any particulars in which the instructions, etc., were not observed 
and he shall mention any facts regarding the examination that he deems 
expedient to have brought before the Board of Examiners. The Presiding 
Officer and his assistants shall sign a declaration that in all other respects 
the instructions and regulations were fully complied with. 

(2) The Presiding Officer as part of his report to the Department shall 
send a diagram of each room on the forms provided, showing the position 
occupied by each candidate and Assistant Presiding Officer during each ex- 
amination. Candidates shall not be permitted to change positions. 

(3) The Presiding Officer shall not arrange the answer papers accord- 
ing to subjects, but shall arrange them so that all the answers of each can- 
didate for examination shall be sent all-together and in the order in which 
their name^s appear on the list of candidates for the Examination 
(Form 44 x . To facilitate this elastic bands have been supplied, one for each 
candidate' s set of answers. 

(4) The prompt return of the answers to the Education Department 
at the close of the respective examination is essential and may be greatly 
facilitated if the answers are sorted at the close of each day's examination. 
All diagrams and reports (except the tally-list) should be forwarded to the 
Department by post on the respective days that the answers are forwarded. 
The tally-list of each examination should be returned in its respective bag 
with the candidate's answer envelopes. 

(5) The answers of the candidates taking the (a) the District Certifi- 
cate Examination and (b) the Commercial Specialists' Examination, togeth- 
er with the corresponding tall-lists shall be returned, in separate parcels, 
securely tied, at the close of those examinations, in one of the bags provid- 
ed. 

(6) The answers of the candidates for (a) the Part II. Junior 
Teachers', (b) Junior Matriculation and (c) the Senior Teachers', (d) the 
Honor Matriculation Examinations, together with the corresponding tally- 
lists shall be returned in separate parcels, securely tied, at the close of 
those examinations, in one of the bags provided. 

(7) The answers of Scholarship candidates, (Pass or Honors) shall be 
enclosed in the envelopes specially provided (red) shall be made up in a 
separate parcel and shall be returned to the Department in the same bag as 
the Matriculation and Teachers^ answers papers. 

(8) (a) Each bag shall be so folded and tied that the words " The 
property of the Education Department " will be outwards. The shipping 
tag should be securely attached to the strap on each bag. 



194 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(6) All the express charges must be prepaid, and no commercial value 
should be placed upon the bags and contents. 

(c) All surplus examination papers may be given at the close of the 
examination to the principal of the School. 

Expenses of the Examination. 

The Treasurer of the High School Board or the Public School Board 
of the school where the examination is held shall pay on the certificate of 
the Public School Inspector, all the expenses of the examination which 
shall include the following : — 

(1) For preparing the list of candidates, the inspector shall be en- 
titled to the remuneration of $2.00, providing that the number of the can- 
didates writing does not exceed twenty. For each additional twenty can- 
didates or fraction of that' number the Inspector shall be entitled to an ad- 
ditional dollar. It is to be understood that the number of applications re- 
ceived, and not the examination on which the candidates write, will deter- 
mine the amount paid for this service. 

(2) For conducting the examination each Presiding Officer and each 
assistant presiding officer shall be entitled to $4.00 a day and actual trav- 
elling expenses which shall include railway fare or the ordinary cost of 
conveyance. 

(3) For meeting the incidental expenses of the examination, the cost 
of stationery, etc., and the payment for any additional services required 
during the examination. 

General Instructions to Applicants and Inspectors. 

Fees. 

District Certificate Examination $5. Part II. Junior Teachers' $5. 
Junior Matriculation Examination $5. Senior Teachers' Examination 
Part I and II each $3; taken together $5. Commercial Specialist Ex- 
amination, $5. For candidates for examination in the additional subjects 
(not to exceed four) for matriculation into any university or learned pro- 
fession, the fee shall be $2. For more than 4 subjects $5. Honor or 
scholarship matriculation $5. If the fees for a candidate amount to more 
than $5, only $5 will be required. 

Attention is directed to the scale of fees to be paid, by candidates. 
When the fee is $5, $3, or $2, the amount to be sent to the Department is 
$3, $2, or $1 respectively. The remainder of the fees received is to be for- 
warded to the High School Board or other body that bears the expense of 
the examination. 

Applications will not be received by the Inspector after the 24th day of 
May, and candidates are reminded that they should in no case forward their 
applications to the Education Department. If the candidate should, 
through an oversight, neglect to have his application duly sent to the In- 
spector, he may present himself at the examination, when the Presiding 
Officer is at liberty to admit him, provided there is the necessary accommo- 
dation, and that a sufficient number of examination papers has been for- 
warded. An additional fee of $1 will he exacted by the Presiding Officer 
from a candidate who presents himself in this way. 

Toronto. November, 1904. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 195 



II. ORDERS-IN-COUNCIL. 



1. Mr. Wm. Casey appointed Gardener and Assistant Engineer of the 
London Normal School. Approved 6th January, 1904. 

2. Regulations respecting Manual Training and Household Science. 
Approved 23rd March, 1904. 

3. Abolition of Art School examinations after this year, except those 
for "Teachers 5 certificates including such as are required for Specialists. 
Approved 15th April, 1904. 

4. Order-in-Council of Tth October, 1903, amended so as to continue 
the appointments of Teachers of Manual Training for another year after 
the 1st day of September, 1904. Approved 22nd April, 1904. 

5. Section 51 of the Regulations of Education Department amended 
by striking out the word "Ontario" in the third line and substituting there- 
for the word "Canada." Approved 31st May, 1904. 

6. Certificates (9) to teach Household- Science in the Public and High 
Schools granted. Approved 15th June, 1904. 

7. Regulations regarding free text-books. Approved 30th June, 
1904. 

8. Mr. J. S. Mercer granted an interim certificate qualifying him to 
teach in a High School or Collegiate Institute. Approved 13th July, 
1904. 

9. Regulations authorizing text-books. Approved 23rd July, 1904. 

10. High School established in the Village of Chesley. Approved 
10th August, 1904. 

11. High School established in the Tillage of Plantagenet. Approv- 
ed 10th August, 1904. 

12. High School established in the Town of Mildand. Approved 
10th August, 1904. 

13. Revised Regulations of the Education Department bearing date 
August, 1904. Approved 17th August, 1904. 

14. Miss Mary H. Merritt transferred from the teaching staff of the 
Ottawa Model School to the Toronto Model School, and Miss Evelyn Helen 
Weir appointed to the Ottawa School. Approved 16th September, 1904. 

15. Latin Grammar, by E. W. Hagarty, added to list of text-books 
authorized 23rd July, 1904. Approved 30th September, 1904. 

16. Miss Clara Burgoyne granted a certificate to teach Household 
Science. Approved 30th September, 1904. 

17. Miss J. Stocks appointed Assistant Librarian, Education Depart- 
ment, appointment to take effect 1st November, 1904. Approved 7th Oc- 
tober, 1904. 

18. Miss Meta M. D. McBeth appointed pianist to the Toronto Normal 
and Model Schools. Approved 17th October, 1904. 

19. Miss Jennie Hilliard appointed Teacher in the Ottawa Model 
School. Approved 26th October,. 1904. 

20. Certificates (2) to teach Household Science granted. Approved 
2nd November, 1904. 

21. Toronto Technical School made a Technical High School to date 
from 1st September, 1904. Approved 2nd November, 1904. 

22. Appointments to the Educational Council made. Approved 2nd 
November, 1904. 

23. The Ontario Institution for the Deaf and Dumb at Belleville, and 
the Ontario Institution for the Blind at Brantford, transferred from the 
Provincial Secretary's Department to the Education Department. Approved 
23rd November, 1904. 

16 E. 



196 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



24. Berlin High School raised to the rank of a Collegiate Institute, 
said status to take effect from 1st September, 1904. Approved 30th No- 
vember, 1904. 

25. Book entitled "The Principles and Practice of Oral Reading," au- 

in, the High Schools and Continuation Classes. Approved 
8th December, 1904. 

26. Mr. H. R. Alley appointed Librarian of Education Department. 
Approved 9th December, 1904. 

27. Miss A. H. Baker appointed Assistant Kindergarten teacher at the 
Ottawa Model School, appointment to take effect 1st November, 1904. 
Approved 16th Decern ber, 1904. 

28. Second Class Professional .Certificate issued to Miss M. L. Ger- 
trude Hagar in 1882, cancelled in 1884, re-issued to her. Approved 16th 
December, 1904. 

29. Certificates (11) to teach Manual Training granted. Approved 
16th December, 1904. 

30. "Rose's Public School Geography " authorized for use in the Pub- 
lic Schools. Approved 23rd December, 1904. 

31. The following books authorized for use in the schools: — For Pub- 
lic Schools — A Canadian History by Weaver. The Story of 
the Canadian People, by Duncan. For High Schools and Continuation 
Classes — The Commercial Course in Practical Bookkeeping and Business 
Forms, by Dickenson and Young. Approved, 23rd December, 1904. 

32. Certificates (3) to teach Household Science granted. Approved 
23rd December, 1904. 

33. High School established in the village of Rockland. Approved 
30th December, 1904. 



APPENDIX I.— TECHNICAL EDUCATION— PUBLIC AND FREE 

LIBRARIES, ART SCHOOLS, LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC 

INSTITUTIONS, ETC. 

Report of S. P. May, M.D., C.L.H., Superintendent of Public Libraries, 

Art Schools, Etc. 

Sir, I have the honor to submit herewith my report on the Public and 
Free Libraries, Art Schools and Scientific Institutions receiving a share of 
the Legislative Grant, in the Province of Ontario for the year ending 31st 
December, 1903. Prior to payment of Grants I visited and inspected the 
following Public Libraries, Scientific Institutions, etc : — 

Aberarder, Acton, Alton, Aurora, Baden, Barrie, (1) Belleville, Brace- 
bridge, Bradford, Brampton, Caistorville, Caledon, Callander, Camden East, 
Campbellford, Cardinal, Chepstow, Clifford, Comber, Cornwall, Don, Dun- 
dalk, Dunnville, East Toronto, Flesherton, Fonthill, Forest, Fort Erie, 
Gananoque, Garden Island, Georgetown, Glen Cross, Gravenhurst, (2) 
Guelph, Hamilton P.L., Hamilton Art School, Hamilton Scientific Asso- 
ciation, Hanover, Harrowsmith, Iroquois, Keswick, Kingston, Komoka, 
Leamington, Lefroy, London, Lucan, Madoc, Mildmay, Mono Road, Mor- 
risburgh, Napanee, Newburgh, New. Hamburgh, Orangeville, Orillia, (3) 
Ottawa P.L., Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club, Ottawa L'Institut Canadien 
Francais, Ottawa Literary and Scientific Society, Ottawa St. Patrick's As- 
sociation, Ottawa University Scientific Society, Perth, Port Hope, Price- 
ville, Rockwood, Ridgetown, Shakespeare, (4) Smith's Falls, Smithville, 
Sterling, Stratford, Strathcona, Strathroy, St. Thomas P.L., St. Thomas 

16a e. 



904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 197 



Art School, Sydenham, Toronto Junction, Trenton, Yandorf, Yankleek 
Hill, Wales, Walkerton, Welland, Weston, Wheatley, Winchester, Wolfe 
Uhmcl, (5) Woodstock, Yarker. 

(1) Belleville Public Library is now Free ; circulation of books in- 
creased about five times and Reading Room very popular. 

Sir Gilbert Parker donates $100.00 per annum to this Library. 

(2) Guelph. A new building is in course of erection. Carnegie 
grant |20,000. The building has a very fine appearance; it is built with 
artificial stone and stone foundation on a prominent site in the City Park. 

(3) Ottawa has a Free Library in course of erection. Carnegie grant 
1100,000. The site cost over $20,000. The building is Indiana Lime 
Stone, with stone foundation ; it is to be opened in May, 1905, and will con- 
tain the following rooms : — 1st floor — delivery room, stock room, librarian's 
room, open shelf room, catalogue room, reading room, ladies' room, chil- 
dren's room, reception room, coat room, etc. ; 2nd floor— Upper part of 
stock room, museum, ladies' room, board room, lecture hall, newspaper 
room, two study rooms, and society or association room. This library will 
be a great boon to the citizens of Ottawa, it being erected in a prominent 
central position is certain to be well patronized. 

(4) Smith's Falls. Their new library is now open ; cost of building 
$11,000 (Carnegie grant). Messrs. Frost Bros, contributes $600 per annum- 
The Town Council paid for site, furniture, etc. 

(5) Woodstock Public Library is now Free and very successful, notwith- 
standing loss from fire, etc. The number of readers has increased 150 per 
cent. 

It is very gratifying to state that the result of my inspections the past 
few years is very satisfactory. I have always recommended that Libraries 
should be made free, and that the municipal councils should contribute to 
the maintenance of the Libraries, which are for the benefit of their own 
people, and especially for the educational advantages to young people ; giv- 
ing them access to books relating to their intended life work, in fact a kind 
of post graduate education. 

The following lists show that Ontario had 128 Free Libraries which re- 
ceived municipal grants in 1903, and 167 Libraries (not free) received mu- 
nicipal aid in 1903 : — 

Free Libraries — Acton, Ailsa Craig, Arnprior, Athens, Aylmer, Ayr, 
Beeton, Belleville. Berlin, Bothwell, Bracebridge, Brampton, Brantford, 
Bighton, Brockville,, Brussels, Burk'sy Falls, Caistorville, Caledonia, 
Camden East, Cardinal, Carleton Place, Cayuga, Chatham, Chesley, Ches- 
terville, Clifford, Clinton, Collingwood, Copleston, Cornwall, Creemore, 
Deseronto, Delhi, Don, Drayton, Dutton, Erin, Exeter, Fordwich, Forest, 
Gait, Garden Island, Georgetown, Glencoe, Goderich, Grand Yalley, 
Grantham, Gravenhurst, Grimsby, Guelph, Hagersville, Hamilton, Hes- 
peler, Holyrood, Ingersoll, Iroquois, Kemptville, Kingsville, Lakefield, 
Lanark, Lancaster, Leamington, Lindsay, Listowel, Little Current, Lon- 
don, Lucknow, Markdale, Merrickville, Merritton, Midland, Millbrook, 
Milverton, Mitchell, Niagara Falls South, North Augusta. North Bay, 
Orangeville, Oshawa, Otterville, Paisley, Palmerston, Parkhill, Parry 
Sound, Pembroke, Penetanguishene, Picton, Port Carling, Port 
Col borne, Port Rowan, Prescott, Preston, Renfrew, Richmond 
Hill, Ridgeway, Sarnia, Sault Ste. Marie, Seaforth, Shelburne, Simcoe, 
Smith's Falls, Stayner, Stouffville, Stratford, Streetsville, St. Catharine?, 
St. Marys, St. Thomas, Sundridge, Tamworth, Tara, Thessalm, Thornhill, 
Thorold, Toronto, Trenton, Uxbridge, Wallaceburg, Waterford, Waterloo, 



19S THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Watford, Westford, Wiarton, Windsor, Wingham, Wroxeter, Wyoming, 
128. 

The following libraries (not free) received municipal grants in 1903 : 

Abingdon, Admaston, Alma, Almonte, Amherstburg., Ancaster, Angus, 
Arthur, Atwood, Auburn, Baden, Barrie; Beachville, Beamsville, Beaver- 
ton, Belfountain, Belwood, Bervie,, Blenheim, Bobcaygeon, Bolton, Bow- 
manville, Bracondale, Bradford, Bridgeburgh, Brigden, Brooklyn, Bruce- 
field Bunyan, Burlington, Callendar, Cambray, Campbellford, Canfield, 
Cannington, Cargill, Carp, Chepstow, Claremont, Cobourg, Cold Springs, 
Coldwater, Comber, Dresden, Dundalk, Dundas, Dungannon, Dunnville., 
Durham, Elmwood, Elora, Embro, Emsdale,, Ennotville, Essex, Ethel, Fene - 
lon Falls, Fergus, Fonthill, Fort Erie,, Fort Francis, Gananoque, Glam- 
mis, Glen Allen, Glen Cross, Glenmorris, Gorrie, Haliburton, Harrow, 
Hensall, Hepworth, Highgate, Huntsville, Inwood, Kincardine, Kingston, 
Kinmount, Kirkfield, Lion's Head, Little Britain,, Lome Park, Lucan, 
Lynden, Manilla, Manitowaning, Maple, Marksville, Meaford, Melbourne, 
Mildmay, Minden, Molesworth, Monkton, Morrisburgh, Mount Brydges, 
Mount Forest, Napanee, Newbury, New Hamburg, New Dundee, Newmar- 
ket, Niagara, Niagara Falls, Norland, Norwich, Norwood, Oakville, Oak- 
wood, Omemee, Orillia, Pakenham, Paris, Perth, Petrolea, Pickering, 
Pinkerton, Point Edward, Port Arthur, Port Credit,, Port Dover, Port El- 
gin, Port Perry, Rat Portage, Ridgetqwn, Ripley, Riversdale, Rodney, 
Romney, Rosseau, Saltfleet, SmithvilleJ Southampton, Springfield, Strath- 
roy, St. George, St. Helen's, Sunderland, Sunnidale, Sydenham, Teeswater, 
Thamesford, Thamesville, Thornbury, Tilbury, Tilbury East, Tilsonburg, 
Tiverton, Toronto Junction, Underwood, Unionville, Victoria, Walkerton, 
Walton,., Wardsville, Warkworth, Waterdown, Welland, West Lome, Wes- 
ton, Wheatley, Whitby, Williamstown, Woodstock, Wardsville, Yarker, 
York, Zephyr. 

248 Public Libraries (not free) were paid grants for 1903. 

131 Public Libraries (free) were paid grants for 1903. 

52 Libraries did not report for 1903^ as follows : — 

Algonquin, Bancroft, Battersea, Belmont, Binbrook, Bognor, Broug- 
ham, Burritt's Rapids, Chapleau, Colborne, Cold Springs, Copper Cliff, Daw- 
son, Duart, Dundella, Elgin, Finch, Flesherton, Floradale,, Forks of the 
Credit, Freelton, Gore Bay, Hastings, Hillsburg, Holland Centre, Kars, 
Kearney, King, Kintore, Linwood, Maitland, Metcalfe, Mono Centre,, Mono 
Mills,, Moose Creek, Morewood, Munster, Nairn Centre, Oil Springs, Ophir, 
Pelee Island, Powassan, Primrose, Queensville, Rosemount, Thornton, 
Trout Creek, Tweed, Yars, Yiolet Hill, Wesport, Winchester 

I was successful in re-organizing three Libraries during the year, but 
the following Libraries, including some that never reported after incorpora- 
tion, are taken off the list of Libraries entitled to grants for 1904 : —Cache 
Bay, Courtright, Farran's Point, Grantley, Homing's Mills, Jerseyville, 
Orrville, Osnabruck Centre, Singhampton, Winchester Springs, 10. 

Niagara Falls and Niagara Falls South Public Libraries have amalga- 
mated, and the new Library is called the City of Niagara Falls P/ublic 
Library. 

The following Libraries were incorporated during the year : — 

Ayton, Cockburn Island, Depot Harbor, Hawkesbury. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



199 



The following table shows the locality of every Public and Free Library in the 
Province on the 1st December, 1904. 

Free and Public Libraries. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



Addington 



Algoma 



Brant 



Brace 



Carleton 




Counties and 
Districts. 



Camden, East. 
Enterprise. 
Napanee Mills (Strathcona P.O.) 
Newburgh. 
Tamworth. 
Yarker. 
Bruce Mines. 
Chapleau. 
Coulaia Bay. 
Marksville. 
Nairn Centre. 
Ophir. 

Port Arthur. 
Rat Portage. 
Sault Ste. Marie. 
Schrieber. 
Thessalon. 
Victoria Mines. 
Webbwood. 
Brantford. 
Burford. 
Glenmorris. 
New Durham. 
Paris. 
Scotland. 
St. George. 
Bervie. 
Cargill. 
Chepstow. 
Chesley. 
Elmwood. 
Glammis. 
Hepworth. 
Holyrood. 
Kincardine. 
Lion's Head. 
Lucknow. 
Mildmay. 
Paisley. 
Pinkerton. 
Port Elgin. 
Ripley. 
Riversdale. 
Southampton. 
Teeswater. 
Tara. 
Tiverton. 
Underwood. 
Walkerton. 
Westwood. 
i Wiarton. 
J Carp. 
i Dawson. 
I Kars. 
Kinburn. 
Manotick. 



Carleton 



Dufferin ... 



Dundas 



Durham 



Elgin 



Essex 



Frontenac 



i-longarry 



Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Metcalfe. 

Munster. 

North Gower. 

Richmond. 

Glen Cross. 

Grand Valley. 

Honeywood. 

Melancthon. 

Mono Centre. 

Orangeville. 

Primrose. 

Rosemont. 

Shelburne. 

Violet Hill. 

Chesterville. 

Dundela. 

Inkerman. 

Iroquois. 

Matilda (Iroquois P.O.) 

Morewood. 

Morrisburg. 

Winchester. 

Bowmanville. 

Millbrook. 

Orono. 

Port Hope. 

Aylmer. 

Bayham. 

Dutton'. 

Port Burwell. 

Port Stanley. 

Rodney. 

St. Thomas. 

Shedden. 

Sparta. 

Springfield. 

Vienna. 

West Lome. 

Amherstburg. 

Comber. 

Essex. 

Harrow. 

Kingsville. 

Leamington. 

Pelee Island. 

Windsor. 

Battersea. 

Garden Island. 

Karrowsmith. 

Kingston. 

Mississippi. 

Sydenham. 

Wolfe Island. 

Lancaster. 

Maxville. 

Williamstown. 



200 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Free and Public Libraries.— Continued. 



Counties and 
Districts. 




Grey 



Halliburton 
Haldimand 



Halton .... 



Hastings 




Algonquin. 

Burritt's Rapids 

Cardinal. 

Easton's Corners. 

Jasper. 

Kemptville. 

Maitland. 

Merrickville. 

North Augusta. 

Oxford Mills. 

Prescott. 

Spencerville. 

Ayton. 

Badjeros. 

Bognor. 

Chatsworth. 

Clarksburg. 

Dromore. ' 

Durham. 

Dundalk. 

Flesherton. 

Holland Centre. 

Holstein. 

Kemble. 

Hanover. 

Lake Charles. 

Markdale. 

Meaford. 

Maxwell and Feversham. 

Owen Sound. 

Priceville. 

Shallow Lake. 

Thornbury. 

Haliburton. 

Minden. 

Caledonia. 

Canfield. 

Cayuga. 

Cheapside. 

Dufferin (Clanbrassil P.O.) 

Dunnville. 

Hagersville. 

Jarvis. 

Nanticoke. 

Victoria (Caledonia P.O.) 

York. 

Acton. 

Burlington. 

Georgetown. 

Milton. 

Oakville. 

Bancroft. 

Belleville. 

Deseronto. 

Madoc. 

Marlbank. 

Stirling. 

Trenton. 

Tweed. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



Huron 



Kent 



Lambton 



Lanark 



Cities, Towns and Tillages 



Auburn. 

Brucefield. 

Blyth. 

Brussels. 

Clinton. 

Dungannon. 

Ethel. 

Exeter. 

Fordwich. 

Goderich. 

Gorrie. 

Hensall. 

Molesworth. 

Seaforth. 

St. Helen's. 

Walton. 

Wingham. 

Wroxeter. 

Blenheim. 

Bothwell. 

Chatham. 

Dresden 

Duart. 

Highgate. 

Tilbury. 

Tilbury E. (Valetta P.O.) 

Bridgetown. 

Romney. 

Thamesville. 
Wallaceburg. 
Wheatley. 

Arkona. 

Aberarder. 

Alvinston. 

Brigden. 

Bunyan. 

Copleston. 

Forest. 

Inwood. 

Oil Springs. 

Petrolea. 

Point Edward. 

Sarnia. 

Thedford. 

Watford. 

Wyoming. 

Allan's Mills. 

Almonte. 

Carleton Place. 

Dalhousie. 

Elphin. 

Lanark. 

Maberley. 

Middleville. 

Pakenham. 

Perth. 

Poland. 

Smith's Falls. 

Watson's Corners. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



20 1 



Free and Public Libraries. — Continued. 



Counties and 




Districts. 


Cities, Towns and Villages. 


Leeds 


Addison. 






Athens. 







Brockville. 






Elgin. 






Gananoque. 




' 


Mallorytown. 




* 


Newboro'. 


" 


Westport. 


Lennox 


Odessa. 





Napanee. 


Lincoln . 


^uingdon. 


" 


Beamsville. 


" 


Caistorville. 


«' 


Grantham (St. Catharines P.O.) 





Merritton. 


" 


Grimsby. 


" 


Niagara. 





Smithville. 





St. Catharines. 


Manitoulin 


Cockburn Island. 


" 


Gore Bay. 


" 


Little Current. 


" 


Manitowamng. 


Middlesex 


Ailsa Craig. 





Belmont. 




Coldstream. 


" 


Dorchester. 




Glencoe. 




Komoka. 




•London. 


" 


Lucan. 


" 


Melbourne. 


" 


Mt. Brydges. 


" 


Newbury. 





ParKhill. 


" 


Strathroy. 


" 


Wardsville. 


Muskoka 


Bracebridge. 


" 


Baysville. 


" 


Gravenhurst. 




Huntsville. 





Port Carling. 


" 


Severn Bridge. 


Nipissing 


Copper Cliff. 




Haileybury. 





North Bay. 




Thornloe. 


Norfolk 


Bloomsburg. 





Delhi. 


" 


Port Dover. 


" 


Port Rowan. 





Simcoe. 




Waterford. 


Northumberl'd. 


Brighton. 




Campbellford. 




Cobourg. 




Cold Springs. 




Colborne. 




Fenella. 




Gore's Landing. 






Warkworth. 



Counties and 
Districts. 




Parry Sound 



Peel 



Perth 



Cities, Towns and Village 



Beaverton. 

Brooklin. 

Brougham. 

Cannington. 

Claremont. 

Oshawa. 

Pickering. 

Port Perry. 

Sunderland. 

Oxbridge. 

Whitby. 

Zephyr. 

Beachville. 

Drumbo. 

Embro. 

Harrington. 

Ingersoll. 

Kintore. 

Plattsville. 

Norwich. 

Otterville. 

Princeton. 

Tavistock. 

Tillsonburg. 

Thamesford. 

Woodstock. 

Burk's Falls. 

Callender. 

Depot Harbor. 

Emsdale. 

Kearney. 

Parry Sound. 

Powassan. 

Rosseau. 

South River. 

Sprucedale. 

Sundridge. 

Trout Creek. 

Alton. 

Belfountain. 

Bolton. 

Brampton. 
J Caledon. 
I Cheltenham. 
j Claude. 

Forks of the Credit. 

Inglewood. 

Lome Park. 

Mono Road. 

Mono Mills. 

! Port Credit. 

1 Streetsville. 

Atwood. 

Listowel. 
! Milverton. 
1 Monkton. 

Mitchell. 

Shakespeare. 

St. Mary's. 
Stratford. 



202 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 



Free and Public Libraries. — Continued. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



;- 



Peterborough 



Prescott 

Prince Edward 
Rainy River ... 
Renfrew 



Russell ... 
Stormont 



Simcoe 



Victoria 



Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Falls. 



Hastings. 

Havelock. 

Lakefield. 

Norwood. 

Peterborough. 

Hawkesbury. 

Vankleek Hill 

Bloomfield. 

Picton. 

Dryden. 

Fort Frances. 

Admaston. 

Arnprior. 

Burnstown. 

Cobden. 

Douglas. 

Forester's 

Pembroke. 

Renfrew. 

White Lake. 

Russell. 

Vars. 

Avonmore. 

Berwick. 

Cornwall. 

Crysler. 

Finch. 
Moose Creek. 

Newington. 

Wales. 

Alliston. 

Angus. 
I Barrie. 

Beeton. 
| Bradford. 

Coldwater. 

Colling wood. 

Cookstown. 

Creemore. 

Elmvale. 

Hillsdale. 

Leffoy. 

Midland. 

Orillia. 

Penetanguishene. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



Waterloo 



Welland 



Wellington 



Stayner. 

Sunnidale (New Lowell P.O.) 

Thornton. 

Tottenham. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Cambray. 

Fenelon Falls. 

Kinmount. 

Kirkfield. 

Little Britain. 

Lindsay. 

Manilla. 

Norland. 

Oakwood. 

Omemee. 

Woodville. 



Wentworth 



York 



Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Ayr. 

Baden. 

Berlin. 

Elmira. 

Floradale. 

Gait. 

Hawkesville. 

Hespeler. 

Linwood. 

New Dundee. 

New Hamburg. 

Preston. 

Waterloo. 

Wellesley. 

Bridgeburg. 

Fonthill. 

Fort Erie. 

Niagara Falls. 

Niagara Falls South. 

Port Colborne. 

Eidgeway. 

Thorold. 

Welland. 

Alma. 

Arthur. 

Belwood. 

Clifford. 

Drayton. 

Elora. 

Erin. 

Ennotville. 

Fergus. 

Glen Allan. 

Guelph. 

Harriston. 

Hillsburg. 

Morriston. 

Mount Forest. 

Palmerston. 

Rockwood. 

An caster. 

Binbrook. 

Dun das. 

Freelton. 

Hamilton. 

Mill Grove. 

Lynden. 

Saltfleet (Stew 

Waterdown. 

Aurora. 

Bracondale. 

Don. 

East Toronto. 

Highland Creek. 

Islington. 

Keswick. 

King. 

Maple. 
Markham 
Mount Albert. 
Newmarket. 



Creek P.O.) 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



203 



Fkee and Public LiBRxmEn.—Conduded. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



York . . 



Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Queensville. 
Richmond Hill. 
Scarboro'. 

Stouffville. 
Thornhill. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



York 



Cities, Towns and Villages 



Toronto. 

Toronto Junction. 

Unionville. 

Vandorf. 

Weston. 

Woodbridge. 



The aboTe list may be classified as follows:— 

Public Libraries reporting 288 

Free Libraries reporting no 

Public Libraries not reporting ^ 

Free Libraries not reporting 6 



Public Libraries incorporated since 31st 

December, 1903 4 

Totals 484 



I. PUBLIC LIBRARIES (NOT FREE). 

The following extracts are taken from the annual reports for the year 
ending 31st December, 1903. (For details see table A). 

1. Classification of Public Libraries Reporting. 

Public Libraries with reading rooms 94 

Public libraries without reading rooms 194 

Total 288 

2. — Public Libraries — Receipts and Balances on Hand. 

The total recipts of 288 Public Libraries was $75,376.23 

Balances on hand 5,197.23 

3. Public Libraries — Expenditure. 

The total expenditure of 288 Public Libraries was $70,179 00 

4. Public Libraries— Assets and Liabilities. 

Assets of 288 Public Libraries $424,500 78 

Liabilities of 288 Public Libraries 16,339 45 

5. Number of Members in Public Libraries. 

288 Public Libraries have 36,480 members. 

6. No. of Volumes in Public Libraries and No. of Volumes Issued. 

Number of volumes in 288 Libraries 536,325 

Number of volumes issued in 288 Libraries 818,312 

7. Reading Rooms in Public Libraries. 

94 Public Libraries reporting have reading rooms. 

21 Libraries reported having periodicals for circulation. 

115 Libraries subscribed for 2,222 newspapers and periodicals. 



204 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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210 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



II. PUBLIC LIBRARIES, FREE. 

The following extracts are taken from the Annual Reports for the year 
ending 31st December, 1903, (for details see table B). 

1. Classification of Free Libraries Reporting. 

Free Libraries, with reading rooms 92 

Free Libraries, without reading rooms 48 

Total 140 

2. Free Libraries, Receipts and Balances on Hand. 

The total receipts of 140 Free Libraries was... $165, 564 90 
Balances on hand 9,245 24 

3. Free Libraries, Expenditure. 

The total expenditure of 140 Free Libraries was $156,319 66 

4. Free Libraries, Assets and Liabilities. 

Assets of 140 Free Libraries $845,104 44 

Liabilities of 140 Free Libraries 105,650 94 

5. Number of Readers in Free Libraries. 
140 Free Libraries report having had 137,460 readers. 

6. No. of Volumes in Free Libraries, and No. of Volumes Issued. 

Number of volumes in 140 Free Libraries 628,248 

Number of volumes issued in 140 Free Libraries 1,715,916 



i . 



Reading Rooms in Free Libraries. 



92 Free Libraries reported having reading rooms. 

92 Free Libraries subscribed for 3,760 newspapers and periodicals 



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. A] lO CI lO lO CO 


S-I 




•sjirBiS xudpiutiH 




• Tf OO^CO >lO 

! of ccn 


-us 








: ct> 












nd 










CI 




•OlOOOwOOO CO 


CD 






OcoXOO-hO Ol 


Ph 






cocovo 10 0020 a> 






€^co co i-- r- co oo iO -r 


M 

H 




•s^itbxS gAt^isiSgT 


rH rH rH IN 


08 s 






























CD 


a; 










o 


CD 










CD 


•rj 










03 
1 


c3 










1 


3 




M ■ 




PQ 


o 

3 
3 


* afj • ■ a «.. be 

£-£ t:T3 be« a ^ 


i_q 


Ph 


PQ 




^■Ss:^^^5: 


< 


o 


-tiOcOt^XOJO 


M CO M CO CO eo t 




A* 


1-1 


rnrHr- 




rHrH 



1904: EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 215 

PROPORTIONATE NUMBER OF VOLUMES IN PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 

Libraries With Less Than 250 Volumes. 

Bloomsburg, Glen Cross, Goulais Bay, Inkerman, Keswick, Komoka, 
Priceville — 7. 

Libraries With Over 250. and Less Than 500 "Volumes. 

Abingdon, Addison, Baysville, Caistorville, Callander, Chepstow, Crys- 
ler, East Toronto, Elphin, Forester's Falls, Glamis, Haileybury, Harrow- 
smith, Havelock, Honeywood, Inwood, Lefroy, Lome Park, Maberley, Ma- 
tilda, Maxville, Newboro', Sydenham, Victoria Mines, Watson's Corners, 
Webbwood, Wolfe Island — 27. 

Libraries With Over 500 and Less Than 1,000 Volumes. 

Allan's Mills, Ancaster, Angus, Badjeros, Bayham, Beachville, Berwick, 
Brigden, Brucefield, Bruce Mines, Bunyan, Burnstown, Cambray, Canfield, 
Cobden, Dalhousie, Dorchester, Dromore, Dryden, Elmwood, Enterprise, 
Fenella, Gore's Landing, Haliburton, Hanover, Harrington, Hawkesville, 
Hinsdale, Holstein, Jasper, Maple, Marks ville, Marlbank, Maxwell & Fever- 
sham, Middleville, Millgrove, Molesworth, Mount Albert, Mount Brydges, 
Newbury, New Durham, New Dundee, Newington, Norlp^d, Odessa, Otter- 
ville, Pakenham, Petrolea, Poland, Port Burwell, Port Dover, Riversdale, 
Rosseau, Saltneet, Severn Bridge, Smithville, South River, Spencervills, 
Stirling, Sunnidale, Thornhill, Thornloe, Unionville, Vienna, White Lake, 
Yarker, York — 67. 

Libraries With Over 1,000 and Less Than 1,500 Volumes. 

Admaston, Alma, Auburn, Avonmore, Beaverton, Belwood, Bracondale, 
Bridgeburg, Carp, Chesterville, Clarksburg, Copleston, Creemore, Don, 
Douglas, Drumbo, Dufferin, Easton's Corners, Emsdale, Ethel, Fort Frances, 
Glen Allan, Harrow, Hepworth, Highland Creek, Kemble, Kemptville, Kirk- 
field, Lakefield, Lion's Head, Lyndon, Mallorytown, Manitowaning, Melanc- 
thon, North Augusta, Melbourne, Minden, Mississippi, Monkton, Morriston, 
Napanee Mills, Omemee, Orono, Oxford Mills, Plattsville, Port Stanley, 
Richmond, Ridgeway, Rodney, Scotland, Shallow Lake, Shedden, Spruce- 
dale, Sundridge, Tamworth, Thornbury, Vankleek Hill, Wales, Walton, 
Wardsville, Warkworth, Waterford, Wellesley, Westford, West Lorn«, 
Zephyr— 66. 

Libraries With Over 1,500 and Less Than 2,000 Volumes. 

Alvinston, Arthur, Athens, Atwood, Berrie, Bloomfield, Blyth, Cale- 
donia, Camden East, Cargill, Cayuga, Cheapside, Chesley, Coldstream, Cold- 
water, Cookstown, Delhi, Dresden, Dungannon, Dutton, Elmvale, Erin, 
Fordwich, Gorrie, Hensall, Highgate, Inglewood, Islington, Kinburn, Kings- 
ville, Kinmount, Lanark, Leamington, Little Current, Madoc, Manotick, 
Merritton, North Gower, Norwich, Oakwood, Pickering, Pinkerton, Port 
Carling, Port Credit, Princeton, Ripley, Rockwood, Russell, Schreiber, 
Shakespeare, Springfield, Stayner, St. Helen's, Sunderland, Thamesford, 
Tilbury, Tilbury East, Tiverton, Wheatley, Williamstown, Wyoming — 61. 

Libraries With Over 2,000 and Less Than 2,500 Volumes. 

Acton, Ailsa Craig, Alliston, Arkona, Arnprior, Beamsville, Beeton, 
Belfountain, Bobcaygeon, Bolton, Bothwell, Bradford, Brooklin, Burford, 



216 'i'HK REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Burk's Falls, Burlington, Cannington, Chatsworth, Claremont, Comber, 
Glenmorris, Grand Valley, Grantham, Hagersville, Holyrood, Iroquois, Lake 
Charles, Little Britain, Lucan, Midland, Mildmay, Millbrook, Milverton, 
Mono Road, Nanticoke, Newburgh, Newmarket, North Bay, Norwood, 
Palmerston, Pairkhill, Parry Sound, Pembroke, Port Arthur, Port Col-4 
borne, Port Perry, Port Rowan, Romney, Sault Ste. Marie, Sparta, Tara, 
Thedford, Thessalon, Tottenham, Trenton, Vandorf, Victoria, Wallaceburg, 
Waterdown, Woodbridge, Woodville — 61. 

Libraries With Over 2,500 and Less Than 3,000 Volumes. 

Arthur, Baden, Bracebridge, Cheltenham, Dunnville, Elmira, Essex, 
Fonthill, Fort Erie, Georgetown, Glencoe, Gravenhurst, Jarvis, Manilla, 
Markdale, Meaford, Merrickville, Morrisburgh, New Hamburg, Point Ed- 
ward, Rat Portage, Shelburne, Streetsville, Tillsonburg, Underwood, Wat- 
ford— 26. 

Libraries With Over 3,000 and Less Than 3,500 Volumes. 

Aberarder, Amherstburg, Ayr, Aurora, Bowmanville, Brighton, Brus- 
sels, Caledon, Claude, Cornwall, Drayton, Dundalk, Ennotville, Gananoque, 
Hespeler, Huntsville, Lancaster, Listowel, Lucknow, Markham, Milton, 
Mount Forest, Picton, Port Elgin, Richmond Hill, Tavistock, Toronto Junc- 
tion, Walkerton, Weston, Whitby— 30. 

Libraries With Over 3,500 and Less Than 4,000 Volumes. 

Almonte, Blenheim, Clifford, Cobourg, Durham, Fenelon Falls, Forest, 
Mitchell, Oakville, Orangeville, Renfrew, Ridgetown, Teeswater, Thames- 
ville, Welland, Wiarton, Wingham — 17. 

Libraries With Over 4,000 and Less Than 5,000 Volumes. 

Aylmer, Barrie, Brampton, Campbellford, Cardinal, Carleton Place, 
Clinton, Deseronto, Exeter, Fergus, Goderich, Grimsby, Harriston, Kincar- 
dine, Lindsay, Napanee, Orillia, Oshawa, Owen Sound, Paisley, Penetangui- 
shene, Perth, Port Hope, Sarnia, Seaforth, Smith's Falls, Southampton, 
Stoufiville, St. Mary's, Wroxter— 30. 

Libraries With Over 5,000 and Less Than 6,000 Volumes. 

Alton, Belleville, Collingwood, Embro, Gait, Garden Island, Ingersoll, 
Niagara Falls, Prescott, Scarboro', Simcoe, St. George, Thorold, Woodstock. 
—14. 

Libraries, With Over 6,000 and Less Than 8,000 Volumes. 

Chatham, Dundas, Kingston, Niagara, Paris, Preston, Stratford, Strath- 
roy, St. Thomas, Uxbridge, Waterloo — 11. 

Libraries With Over 8,000 and Less Than 10,000 Volumes. 
Berlin, Elora, St. Catharines — 3. 

Libraries With Over 10,000 and Less Than 20,000 Volumes. 
Brantford, Brockville, Guelph, London, Peterborough, Windsor — 6. 

Library With Over 20,000 and Less Than 30,000 Volumes. 
Hamilton — 1. 

Library With Over 100,000 Volumes. 
Toronto — 1. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



217 



III. ART SCHOOLS AND DEPARTMENTAL DRAWING EXAMINATIONS. 
Tables C to G show the number of Certificates awarded from the commencement of this branch 

of the Education Department in 1882. 
TABLE C . —Certificates awarded in Primary Art Courses from 1882 to 1904 . 



Year. 



1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 



Total 



S £ 

■S.8 


>> 
H 

CD 

s 

o 
O 


o 

02 


28 


21 


17 | 


84 


89 


58 | 


153 


174 


139 | 


214 


529 


301 | 


634 


672 


149 | 


643 


1,204 


428 | 


805 


882 


520 | 


1,002 


961 


394 | 


1,000 


1,009 


290 | 


1,085 


1,569 


292 | 


1,361 


1,419 


569 | 


1,769 


1,277 


439 | 


1,383 


719 


548 | 


1,813 


1,429 


658 [ 


1,195 


569 


361 | 


716 


500 


212 | 


854 


311 


173 | 


1,062 


465 


168 | 


1,000 


254 


194 | 


1,366 


87 


i 59 


823 


154 


111 


1,036 


248 


91 | 


1,463 


212 


126 | 


21,489 


14,754 


6,297 | 



SjO 



12 

47 

138 

168 

662 

444 

403 

470 

811 

746 

1,120 

876 

550 

1,311 

1,110 

704 

1,124 

1,128 

675 

695 

599 

774 

1,293 



15,870 



o.s 

o £ 

5 



"cO J* 






28 
76 
86 

198 | 

414 | 

122 | 

236 | 

494 | 

313s | 

. 422 | 

720 | 

392 | 

562 | 

991 | 

1.121 | 

516 J 

604 j 

1,170 | 

1,007 ) 

431 | 

287 | 

526 | 

903 I 



66 | 

122 | 

77 | 

103 | 

133 | 

187 | 

130 | 

164 | 

338 | 

#0 I 



153 

341 | 

265 | 

114 | 

149 | 

160 | 

130 | 

29 | 

41 | 

38 | 

60 | 



106 
354 
756 
1,532 
2,6v.8 
2,944 
2,979 
3,508 
3,553 
4,278 
5,527 
4,973 
3,915 
6,543 
4,621 
2,762 
3,315 
4,153 
3,260 
2,577 
2,015 
2,713 
4,056 



11,618 | 3,020 



73,048 



TABLE D . —Certificates awarded in Advanced Art Course from 1883 to 1904. 



Tear. 



1882.... 
1884 .... 
If 85.... 
1886.... 
1887.... 
1888.... 
1S89.... 
189C .... 
-.891.... 
1892.... 
11:92.... 
1894 .... 
1895.... 
1896.... 
1 897 . . . 

1P98 

1899 

19C0 

1Q01 .... 
^02 . . . 
190c... 
1904.... 



Total. 



2^ 

m 

5 
16 
33 
35 
59 
22 
65 
62 
80 
24 
58 
31 
56 
60 
61 
67 
61 
80 
76 
35 
26 
10 

1,022 



O ~ 



5 
5 

18 
24 
27 
17 
36 
30 
52 
32 
54 
44 
52 
74 
47 
73 
69 
55 
37 
34 
30 
10 

825 



a 

be O 



o3 O 

go"*" 1 



6C ^ 



12 
12 
35 
19 
28 
39 
58 
76 
67 
53 | 

73 | 
58 | 
78 | 

103 | 
126 | 
169 | 
152 | 
82 | 
138 | 

74 | 
40 | 
27 | 



18 
12 
29 
48 
25 
44 
24 
43 
66 
72 
62 
79 
58 

113 
95 

187 

160 

119 
82 
70 
49 
57 



1,514 | 1,512 



CD £ 

£ So 
2 '53 
g a? 



34 
20 
25 
22 
38 
37 
54 
68 
29 



tc bo 


Teachers' 
certificates . 












4 

3 

14 

14 1 















327 



15 I 

23 | 
13 | 
13 | 

24 j 

11 I 

17 | 

18 | 
18 
2(2 I 

17 r 

13 | 

10 | 

3 I 
3 



434 | 



264 



40 
45 
119 
121 
187 
151 
222 
248 
326 
231 
314 
304 
284 
396 
388 
558 
521 
384 
426 
290 
190 
145 

5,898 



218 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



TABLE E. — Certificates awarded in Industrial Art Course from 1885 to 1904. 



Year. 


Modelling 
in clay . 


Wood 
carving. 


Wood 

engraving 


Litho- 
graphy. 


Painting on 
china. 


Total. 


1885 


14 
11 
8 
10 
7 
7 
5 
2 
5 
4 
5 

5 
7 
9 
17 
9 
6 
5 
1 











14 


1886 


7 

2 

3 

1 

4 

2 

1 

2 

2 

3 

2 

3 

5 

11 

14 

12 

9 

11 

6 









18 


1887 









10 


1888: 

1889 '. 

1890 


1 
3 


1 
2 

1 


9 

6 

6 

7 

3 

3 

10 

18 

30 

17 

17 

17 

6 

8 

12 

5 


24 
19 
18 


1891 


1 


15 


1892 


1 
1 
2 
6 
3 
4 
1 
2 
6 
2 
4 
2 
1 


7 


1893 




11 


1894 




18 


1895 

1896 


2 


34 

38 


1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1902 

1904 • 


1 


30 
30 





42 
43 




31 
31 


1 


24 
8 






Total 


140 


103 


9 


39 


174 


465 



TABLE F. — Certificates awarded in Mechanical Drawing Course from 1883 to 1904. 









^ 












Year. 






w 

bJO £ 


13 _; 
-w So 


o3 

d 
£ be 


0) 

id o 

d oq 


DO 
GO O 

*- <d 

05 .~ 






g 8 

T3 &C 




T5 cl 

:3 o 

d w 


d a> 
73 .tJ 


3 g 




71 ^ 






<! 


£ 


W 


1— H 


<1 


< 


H 


H 


1883 


2 


3 


1 


2 




3 




11 


1884 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1. 




5 


1885 


12 


32 


4 


25 




12 


4 


89 


1886 


14 


13 


5 


28 




14 


3 


77 


1887. 


6 


5 


12 


18 




6 


2 


49 


1P88 


8 


7 


7 


15 




11 


2 


50 


1889 


13 


23 


11 


20 




12 


3 


82 


if£0 


11 


23 


5 


8 




12 


2 


61 


1C91 


3 


31 


8 


31 




28 


2 


103 


1892 


17 


25 


13 


38 




15 


2 


110 


1893 


14 


33 


10 


47 




35 


10 


149 


1894 


12 


17 


6 


90 




9 


3 


137 


1895 


5 


22 


9 


31 




12 


3 


82 


1896 


7 


9 


5 




9 


12 


3 


45 


1P97 


16 


13 


4 




6 


15 




54 


1898 


6 


19 


2 




7 


8 




42 


1899 


25 


20 


5 




7 


18 




75 


KW! 


14" 


8 


12 




5 


14 




53 


19C1 


21 


18 


2 




14 


15 


1 


71 


1902 


18 


15 


6 




3 


45 




57 


1503 


23 


10 


8 




7 


17 




65 


1904 


12 


6 


1 




4 


11 




34 


Total 


260 


353 


137 


354 


62 


295 


40 


1,501 



1WH 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



219 



TABLE G.— Certificates awarded for Extra Subjects from 1885 to 1904. 



Year. 


If 

.5 « 


2 

be 


1 

IS 

t a; 


05 

a 

o 

be 

t g 

cS 

O 


s 

o 
be 

'5 


wi 

O 

O 
V 

"o 
be* 

'S 


be • 

- i 

p 

B 9 


ft 

o 
7. 


03 

a 

o 
A 

V 
o 
a 
o 


"3 

j 
33 

ft 


£ 

£o5 

5 a 

DO 


i 

> 

t>C 

o 
o 

ft 


O 

03 

/ 

$ 

c 

ft 

03 

ft 


a 
Sc 

53 

35 

oa 

c 


M 

a 
a 

03 

- 


be 

a 

if 

oi 

£ 


3 

he 

U2 


J 

o 
ft 

o 

S3 

t- 
O 


3 

o 
o 


ft 

o3 

ho 

o 

>. 

ft 


o 

ft 


1 885 












9 

12 
32 

25 
16 
28 
29 

21 
35 
29 
39 
34 
38 
37 
10 
17 
11 
19 
13 
4 

458 


7 
7 
9 
14 
21 
18 
26 
16 
21 
16 
24 
38 
42 
28 
22 
10 
18 
28 
15 
8 

3)68 






























1886 






































16 


1887 








7 

15 

12 

7 

4 

2 

5 

8 

11 

12 

17 

12 

17 

13 

9 

13 

22 

15 

204 


"vi 

8 
4 
5 
(i 
9 
6 
4 
6 
6 
9 
2 
4 
i 
1 
7 
2 

92 












2 
2 
















19 


] sss 








13 
3 

10 
3 

7 

5 

10 

6 

7 

7 

8 

12 

14 

17 

8 

137 


• l 

2 
4 
6 
1 
4 
7 
1 
1 
3 
6 
1 
5 
4 
2 
4 
2 




2 


















50 


1 889 






















84 


1890 






























62 


1891 






























71 


L892 
























2 








is ( >:; 


11 
11 
26 
14 
19 
22 
19 
29 
25 
22 
28 
15 

241 


lT 
12 

14 
30 
17 
16 
12 
19 

131 


'2 
2 
6 

"i" 






















55 


1894 










10 
17 
13 
22 
15 
31 
14 
13 
17 
13 
30 


3 
4 

13 
10 
16 
12 
16 
12 


1 

5 

1 
4 
6 
5 
4 
6 
4 
6 
8 


"l 








94 


1895 . . 


■ 95 


1896 


2 
3 
6 
4 
5 
4 

"4" 

4 


"i" 


1 

3 
6 
3 
3 
4 










147 


1897 . . . 










129 


IS'. IS . . 










179 


1§99 














171 


1900 










149 


1901 


156 


1902 .. 










142 


1903 .. 






5 


"g" 


151 


1904 .. 








148 


















Total ..... 


] 


i 


5.4 


32 


3 


20 


« 


195 


87 


50 


1 


2 


5 


6 


2,121 



TABLE H.— Certificates awarded to Art Schools, 1904. — Primary Course. 





CO 




Number of Certificates. 




2 












O) 


















■s 

OS 

O) . 




co a 












.2 id 


*» OQ 


Name ot' School. 


3* 


5 
^ 


-t-> 

0> 


. > 

'-+3 
o 

03 


03 


T3 
O 
44 


1 profic 
•tificate 


■2-E 




S o 

rJMH 


O) 
Sh 


o 

0J 


CO 
03 


o 


o 
OS 




9 03 

3 O 




£ 


fXH 


O 


Cu 


s 


pq 


H 


fc 


Hamilton Art School 


70 
20 
38 


20 

7 

14 


o 

2 

1 


2 

2 
2 


17 

4 

15 


19 

6 

12 


61 

21 
44 




St. Thomas " 




Toronto " 


1 






Total 


128 


41 


6 


6 


36 


37 


126 


1 







TABLE I. — Certificates awarded to Art Schools, 1904. — Advanced Course. 





CO 

G d 

oj 

£ g 


Number of Certificates. 


0) 


Name of School. 


o 


a 

o 

o 


8 
o 

Us 


o 

is 

Q 


22J53 


o 

O O) 

P 3 

-4-1 

CS CD 
O U 

H 


■e'-e 


Hamilton Art School 


63 

8 

49 


1 


3 


6 


12 
3 

1 


15 
1 
5 


37 

4 

16 




St. Thomas " 




Toronto " 


3 


2 


5 








Total 


120 


4 


5 


11 


16 


21 


. 









220 



THE RKFUK1 Ul< i HE 



No. 12 



TABLE J. — Certificates awarded to Art Schools, 1904.— Mechanical Course. 





02 


Number of Certificates. 




cp g 














ns o 












>> 




3:3 












o 




cog 






o 


'eS 


anced 
rspective. 


.2 CD 


Name of School. 


-1 


0) cp 
o3 O 


bb 

.3 ce 


tooS 

.3 02 

^3 a 


:hitectur 
esigns. 


J profic 
rtificate 




> CD 


w±J 


rt o 


> £ 


J3 4> 




?•« 


r£ bfi 


o3^ 


3 « 


£^ 


T3 ^ 


o w 




5 


<l 


£ 


PQ 


<1 


««1 


H 


Hamilton Art School 


39 


5 


3 




2 


6 


16 


St. Thomas " 


11 


3 


2 


1 


2 




8 


Toronto " 


2 




















1 






Total 


52 


8 


5 


4 


6 


24 







TABLE K. — Certificates awarded to Art Schools, 1904. — Industrial Art 

Course. 





02 

C" . 

% 2 

CO g 

o's 

|s 


Number of Certificates. 


Name of School. 


.5 

.s 

O O 


bio 

> 

a 

w 

o 
o 


bb 

.2 
*> 

bO 

a 


o3 

be 
o 

3 


e 
o 

•J .2 

Ph 


o 

C 
.2 ad 

2 ^ 

03 cp 

O u 

H 


Hamilton Art School 


2 
6 


1 






1 




2 


St. Thomas " 


6 




6 


Toronto " 
























Total 


8 


1 


6 




1 




8 







TABLE L.— Certificates awarded to Art Schools, 1904.— Extra Subjects. 





02 

cp a 

"SI 

(n g 

a o 

54 
12 
59 

125 


Number of Certificates. 


Name of School. 


a 

o 

bC 

a 

p-i 


"o 

^02 

•J3 O 

Go 

1 


FH 
03 

bJD^ 

'&£ 

c o 

•a ° 

Ph 
1 


o3 

a 

o 

id 
u 
o 

o 


r 3 

an 

Ph 

1 


o 

b£ 

a 

$H ,—l 

Q 
5 


M 

G • 

l-H 0D 

S 2 

C3 Q 

g* 

P-I 

2 


3 

o 

Si . 

*4H CP 

9.1 

3 


a 

2 

bio . 
10 


d 
'53 

'E 

CD 

M 

7 


E s 

02 CP 

a 
9 


bC 

.S'S 

3 
5 


CP 

A 
>> 

-»j 
O 

ci 

o 

5 


bC 

o 

Ph 

6 




Hamilton Art School 

St. Thomas " 


53 
5 


Toronto " 


2 

2 


1 


2 
3 


2 
2 


3 

4 


10 
15 


10 
12 


12 
15 


9 
19 


13 
20 


63 


Total 


9 


8 


5 


6 


1fll 







1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



221 



TABLE M. — Certificates awarded to Public and High Schools, Ladies' Colleges, 

etc., for 1904. — Primary Course. 



Name of School. 



Almonte High School .... 
Arthur 

Athens .... 

" Model School .... 

Aurora High School .... 

Belleville, Albert College. 

Blyth Public School ' 

Bradford High School . . 
Brantford Central School. 
" Darling St. 

" Victoria School 

Calgary, N.W.T 

Carleton Place H. School 
Chatham, McKeough Sch'l 
Central School.. 
Clinton Coll. Institute . . 
Oollingwood Coll. Institute 
Cornwall High School . . 
Deseronto 
East Toronto " 
Forest 

Hamilton, Coll. Institute 

Barton St. School. 

" Central School . . 

" Cannon St. School 

Caroline St. School 

Hess St. School .. 

" King Edward School. 

" Murray St. School . . 

" Picton St. School 

" Queen Victoria School 

" Ryerson School 

" Sophia St. School . . 
" Stinson St. School . . 

" Victoria School 

" Wentworth St. School 
" West Avenue School.. 
Ingersoll Coll. Institute.. 
Markham High School . . 
Merrickville Public School 
Morrisburgh Coll. Inst. . . | 
Mount Forest High School 
Napanee Coll. Institute., j 
Newmarket High School . . 
Oshawa " 

Owen Sound Coll. Inst. . . j 

Parkhill High School 

Pembroke " 

Perth Coll. Institute 



oj 

2 x 

p o 



Number of certificates. 



38 

26 

81 j 
30 | 
40 | 
20 | 

10 | 
28 | 

119 | 
40 [ 

11 I 

1 I 
76 | 
72 1 

103 j 
35 | 
75 | 

2 I 
47 j 

26 | 

23 | 

79 | 

71 | 

55 | 

136 | 

T\ | 

104 | 
57 | 
33 | 
39 | 

114 | 

176 | 

25 | 
158 | 

39 j 

61 | 
70 \ 

1 I 
68 j 

7 I 
59 | 

37 | 

62 | 

54 | 
43 | 

130 I 

67 | 

26 | 

55 I 



W 



19 
13 
32 
25 
19 
8 
4 
14 
49 
11 
9 

57 
27 
38 
14 
29 

1 
19 

8 

4 
20 
17 
20 
74 
22 
57 
19 
10 
14 
58 
56 

4 

42 
21 
23 
35 

1 
16 



25 
29 | 



3 I 

2 I 

3 I 



3 I 

I 

39 I 



30 j 



51 | 

13 j 

27 | 

12 , 

32 j 

1 I 

10 | 

9 I 



30 j 

13 ] 

24 | 

76 | 

10 | 
37 | 

11 I 



. ~ DC 

U CD 

'•a -£ 

o g 



O ° 



32 

26 
130 

57 

53 

16 

13 

23 
103 

22 

13 

1 

133 

60 

87 

41 

88 
3 

55 

28 
9 

81 

46 

50 
180 

47 
118 | 

39 | 

37 | 

31 | 
181 | 
221 | 

9 1 

83 | 

35 | 

70. | 

92 I 

2 I 

50 | 

2 I 
43 , 

51 | 
53 ] 
42 | 
51 | 

228 j 

67, | 

18 | 

93 I 



Q 03 

+- <v 

P. a> 

B u 



13 



222 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



TABLE M.— Concluded. 





o 

co 

% A 
Bo 

s- -3 

CD s 

•2 3 

B * 
5 ® 

27 
19 
38 
22 
2 
1 

42 

46 

15 

5 

45 
114 
501 
34 
33 
113 

3,407 


Number of certificates. 


*Q0 


Naire of School. 


<t3 

a 

CD 
CD 

S-l 


Geometry . 


o 
2 


o 

11 

9 


V 

O 

o 

s 


o 

.2 a 

E3 o> 

P 3 

li 

H 

31 
31 
31 
17 
3 
1 

63 
83 
15 
16 

66 
192 
79 
45 
16 
168 

3,870 


Number of teachc 
certificates . 


Petrolea High School 


11 

12 

8 

11 


! s 


1 


Richmond Hill " 


5 




10 a 

2 l 4 








Ridgetown 


1 

8 

1 




2 








......... 


I 

I 1 
9 
| 23 
1 


1 


Seaforth Coll. Institute.. 
Smith's Falls Pub School 


26 

37 

7 

1 • 

21 

74 

27 

1 17 


15 
2SS 
8 

4 


1 


Streetsville High School . . 








1 
. 5 


2 


1 

1 /s 




Toronto, Jarvis St. Coll. 
Institute 
" Harbord St Coll Inst 


1 i 

1 
20 | 20 
74 | 44 
!r.5 | 20 
17 1 11 


1 

1 


" Loretto Abbey 


) 5 

5 
31 

206 


2 

1 

9 

120 




i « 


Uxbridge High School . . 
Windsor Coll. Institute . . 

Total 




10 
40 


855 




1 l 


43 
| 1,422 


45 
1,257 


1 

59 



TABLE N. — Certificates awarded to High Schools, Ladies' Colleges, etc. 
1904. — Advanced Course. 



Name of School. 



Belleville Albert College 

Forest High School 

Hamilton, Hess St. Public School 
Sophia St. " " 

Markham High School 

Smith's Falls Public School 

St. Thomas, Alma College 

Toronto, Loretto Abbey 

Windsor Collegiate Institute 

Total 







Number of certificates. 




o 
fee 

W 


a 

o 

u 

.a a 
^ 2 
O 


o 

50 


3 
o 

Q 


c 
"S3 

03 
CO 

I— ( 


o 

o CD 
o g 

O ° 

H 


8 
5 

52 
4 

17 
5 
3 

50 

17 






2 


1 


2 
1' 


5 
1 
4 

1 

3 

2 

11 

33 

25 












4 
1 
2 








1 








2 
2 
6 
4 


1 

2 
2 


2 
3 


3 
18 
12 


3 

4 

7 


161 


6 


5 


16 


41 


17 


85 



m 

Sh 
CD 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



223 



TABLE O. — Certificates awarded to High Schools, etc., 1904. — Mechanical 

Course. 





03 

<z> o 
o'l 

II 


Numberof Certificates. 


Name of School. 


i° 
< 


.s 


id 

cq 


"3 

Sh 

z a 

■2.2° 

" 'So 

-5 ~ 


03 
O £3 

r-, IB 


P o 
o w 


Brantford Central School 


l 
l 

4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
5 


1 










i 


Cobourg Collegiate Institute 








1 
2 
1 


i 


Markham High School 


1 


1 






4 


Morrisburgh Collegiate Institute 






1 


Perth Collegiate Institute 












Ridgetown Collegiate Institute 


1 
1 










1 


Seaforth " " 








1 


2 


Smith's Falls Public School 










Windsor Collegiate Institute 





























Total . . 


17 


4 


1 






5 


10 











TABLE P.— Certificates Awarded to Ladies' Colleges, etc., 1901 

Extra Subjects. 





02 

T5 a 

=5 O 
■ •** *f3 

*| 

03 <3 


Number of Certificates. 


Name of School. 


a o 
""§8 

Ph o 


OQ 
O 



'-£ ^ 
Pn £ 


3 

G.SI 

T3 *02 


~c3 

O 


Belleville, Albert College 


7 
5 






1 


1 


St. Thomas, Alma College 


2 
1 


5 




Toronto, Loretto Abbey 




1 










Total 


18 


3 


5 


1 


9 







An Order in Council has been passed, that in future Art School Examinations by the 
Education Department be abolished. 






224 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



TEACHERS' FULL CERTIFICATES. 

The following full certificates in the Primary and Advanced Courses were 

awarded in 1904- 

1. Teachers' Certificates — Primary Course. 



Name. 



Males. 

Baker, David 

Bicknell, Harry 

Brown, Andrew 

Chagnon, Elmer 

Chapin, Roscoe 

Connolly, Christopher 

Craig, James 

Dallyn, Reginald 

Douglas, Linton 

Ewens, George 

Greene, David 

Hatch, S. B 

Lacasse, Edmund 

Lancefield, Chas 

Leslie, Percy 

Lightheart, Wm 

Little, Wm 

McMillan, George 

McNeil, George 

Metcalfe, Arthur 

Mills, Boy 

Norman, Lambert . . . 

Parmenter, Wm 

Perry, Roy 

PottrufI, Wallace 

Potts, Wm , 

Robertson, James 

Robinson, Wm 

Scott, Allan 

Shearer. David 

Sainsby, Claude 

Weagant, Ross 

Wills, Samuel 



Address. 



Owen Sound 
Petrolea . . . 
Hamilton 

Uxbridge . . . 
Athens .... 
Owen Sound 
Hamilton . . . 
Owen Sound 

Athens .... 
Sarnia .... 
Seaforth . . . 
Hamilton . . . 
Owen Sound 
Hamilton ■ . . 
Owen Sound 
Athens .... 
Owen Sound 
Hamilton . . . 

Tngersoll . . . 
Hamilton . . 

Owen Sound 
Hamilton 



Morrisburg . 
Owen Sound 



Name. 



Females. 

Allison, Gertrude 

Ballentine, Nettie 

Batty, Irene 

Boddy, O J.. : 

Bogart, Bessie 

Buttrum, Mary 

Byron, Kathleen 

Cadwell, Lily 

Charlesworth, Beatrice 

Connell, Ida L 

Danby, Edith 

Defoe, Helen 

Derosier, Martha J 

Every, Maude 

Little, Effie 

McAndrew, Elydia ..>".. 

Morris, Mabel 

Ruby 

Nicholson, Nellie 

Parsons, Lily 

Presnell, Alberta 

Rolfson, Orville 

Taylor, Maude 

Trevaskis. Grace 

Turner, Edith 

White, Kate E 

Wiltse, Winnie 



Address. 



Toronto 

Hamilton . . . 
Owen Sound 

Toronto 
Hamilton . . . 

Athens 

Hamilton . . . 
St. Thomas 

Athens 

Toronto 
Morrisburg . 
Athens .... 
Owen Sound 
Athens 



Hamilton . . . 
Owen Sound 
Hamilton . . . 

Windsor 
Athens .... 
Hamilton . . . 

Collingwood 
Athens .... 



2. Teachers' Certificates— Advanced Course. 



Name. 


Address. 


Name. 


Address. 


Females. 
Defoe, Helen 


Toronto 


Female 
Procunier, May V 


. St. 


Thomas 







1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 225 

Examination Papers. 
The total number of examination papers sent out for 1904 was as follows : 

Primary Course. 

Freehand 525 

Geometry 1,108 

Perspective 940 

Model Drawing 3,176 

Blackboard Drawing 3,180 

8,929 

Advanced Course. 

Shading, flat 161 

Outline, round 159 

Shading, round 178 

Flower Drawing 250 

Industrial Design 135 



883 



Mechanical Course. 

Advanced Geometry 40 

Machine Drawing 43 

Building Construction 3 

Advanced Perspective 33 



119 



Total 9,931 



Art Schools. 

Eeport for the year ending 30th April, 1904. 

Only three Art Schools were in operation in 1903-4, viz. : Hamilton, 
St. Thomas and Toronto. 

The decrease of Art Schools may be attributed to the increased interest 
taken in drawing in Public and High Schools, Ladies' Colleges, etc., also 
to the progress of technical education in the Province. It is gratifying 
to state that qualified teachers are now employed in a large number of High 
and Public Schools, Ladies' Colleges, etc., and their pupils are veTy suc- 
cessful in passing the curriculum of studies in the minor branches. 

An Order-in-Council has recently been passed that in future the Edu- 
cation Department shall not hold Art School Examinations. 

1. Hamilton Art School. Hamilton Art School has recently been re- 
organized with a new staff of teachers. It is proposed that this winter 
a curriculum of studies on technological subjects be prepared and encour- 
aged; this has met with the approval of the Hon. Minister of Education. 

Their report shows that 202 pupils attended day and evening classes; 
4,387 lessons were given. 

The following list shows the number of lessons taken by pupils in each 
subject. 

Primary Course. — Freehand Drawing, 171; Practical Geometry, 152; 
Linear Perspective, 146; Model Drawing, 162; Blackboard Drawing, 143. 

Advanced Course. — Shading from Flat, 365; Outline from Round, 324; 
Shading from Round, 331; Drawing from Flowers, 335; Industrial Design, 
379. 

Mechanical Course. — Advanced Geometry, 107; Machine Drawing, 
496, Building Construction, 188; Architectural Design, 214; Advanced Per- 
spective, 66. 

Industrial Art Course. — Lithography, 46; Painting on China, 216. 

Extra Subjects. — Drawing from Life, 491; Pyrography, 55. 



226 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The report shows that the students in attendance represented the fol- 
lowing trades and professions, viz. : Artists, Cabinet Makers, Carpenters, 
Clerks, Draughtsmen, Lithographers, Machinists, Manufacturers, Painters, 
Plasterers, Plumbers, Pressers, Shoemakers, Stenographers, Students, Tail- 
ors, Teachers, Tobacconists. 

The receipts, including Government Grant, were : f 4,204. 12. 

2. St. Thomas Art School. I recently inspected St. Thomas Art 
School, and am pleased to state that the officers and principal approve of 
changing the. curriculum so as to make Art Schools more valuable by teach- 
ing technical subjects, which will be of special value in their manufacturing 
town. 

Their report showis that they had pupils over 15 years of age who at- 
tended as follows,: 

Primary Course, 34 pupils. 

Advanced Course, 36 pupils. 

Mechanical Course, 57 pupils. 

Industrial Art Course, 11 pupils. 

The pupils represented the following trades and professions, viz. : 
Broom Makers, Clerks, Machinists, Masons, Printers, Railway Clerks, 
Students and Teachers. . ; ... 

As this School is incorporated with the St. Thomas Free Library the 
receipts and expenditure are given in the annual report of the Library for 
1903. 

3. Toronto Art School. The report of the Toronto Art School shows 
that Students attended classes as follows : 

Primary Course.— Freehand, 20; Geometry, 12; Perspective, 15; Model 
Drawing, 16; Blackboard Drawing, 16. 

Advanced Course.— Shading Flat, 34; Outline Round 41; Shading 
Pound, 40; Drawing from Flowers, 33; Industrial Design, 13 

Mechanical Course.— Advanced Geometry, 6; Machine Drawing, t; 
Building Construction, 13; Architectural Design, 12; Advanced Perspective, 

Q 

Extra Subjects".— Painting and Drawing from Life, 64. 

Their report shows that the students in attendance represented the iol- 
lowing trades and professions, viz. : Artists, Architects, Book-keepers Car- 
penters, Clerks, Designers, Draughtsmen Engineers Framers Glass ^tam- 
ers, Illustrators, Lithographers, Nurses, Reporters, Sign Writers, Teachers 
and Wood CaTvers. 

The receipts, as audited for the year ending 1st May, 1904, were $2,- 
765.75; expenditure, $3,758.98; deficit, f 993.23. 

4. Ontario Society of Artists.-Tho report from the Ontario Society 
of Artists shows that the following pictures were selected by the Society lor 
the Provincial Art Gallery : _ „ „ 

-The Coming Storm," J. W. Beatty; "The Day is Done, F. M. Bell- 

11 The following pictures were selected by the Committee of the Civic Art 
Guild for the Provincial Art Gallery : 

"October," W. E. Atkinson •••-•-• — *2?P'nn 

-A Newfoundland Trout Stream," W. Smi>th 125 00 

"Bretaine," G. Chavignaud ••; *oV UU 

"Srniset Glow," F. H. Brigden ...... 1^ 00 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 227 



The Provincial" Art Gallery was re-hung. 113 pictures were placed 
upon the walls. 

The 31st Annual Exhibition was held in March. 118 paintings in oil, 
93 water colors and 3 pieces of sculpture were exhibited. 

The Art Exhibition at (the Toronto Industrial Exhibition was given 
over to the Society, with a grant of 12,000.00 from the Industrial Board of 
Directors. The board also purchased $1, 000.|00 worth of pictures- from 
the walls of the exhibition, which contained 162 oils, 144 water colors, 83 
designs, and illustrations, and 16 sculptures. 

A school of Canadian Designers has been founded by graduates and 
members of the Ontario Society of Artists in London, England, with the 
name of the "Carlton." It is very successful, and great and satisfactory 
results are anticipated. 

The Society sent a valuable collection of pictures- to Winnipeg, and a 
small collection to the Orillia Exhibition. 

The Treasurer's report up to May, 1904, shows that the receipts were 
>t6,644.20; expenditure, f 5,066.14; balance on hand, $1,578.06. 

LITEKABY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

1. Hamilton Scientific Association. 

The report of the Hamilton Scientific Association shows that they have 
2l3 members. 

Four meetings- of council and seven meetings of the general association 
were held during the year, at which the following papers and addresses were 
given : 

(1) Inaugural Address, J. M. Dickson, President. 

(2) The Birds of Ontario, 0. J. Stevenson, M.A. 

(3) The Art of Glass-blowing from the earliest times, F. B. Kenrick, 
M.A., Ph.D. 

(4) Nationalism in Poetry and the Canadian Poets, Prof. Pelham Edgar- 

(5) Ontario North Land, W. A. Park, B.A., Ph.D. 

(6) The Manufacture of National Products, F. B. Allen, M.A., Ph.D. 

(7) Presentation of reports, election of officers, etc. 

New upright cases have been procured for the museum. The museum 
has been kept open every Saturday afternoon during the year for the benefit 
of the public. 

Geological Section. — This section has been very active. Col. C. C. 
Grant read two papers on Geological Notes. The Colonel has> made the 
discovery of several new graptolites, which have been sent to authorities 
for identification and classification. A considerable number of fossil 

sponges have been obtained and distributed to different parts of the world. 
Through the good work 61 Col. Grant the Barton Beds in the vicinity of 
Hamilton have become famous for the number and variety of specimens ob- 
tained from them. About two hundred specimens have been ^resented and 
acknowledged by the British museum, and museums at Ottawa, New York 
and Washington. 

Photographic Section. — This section has held a prosperous year. The 
number of members who contributed slides to the interchange sets and prints 
to the annual exhibition have largely increased. The section is now a 
member of the American Lantern Slide Interchange. Twenty-five mem- 
bers contributed slides from which a selection of one hundred was made, in- 
cluding Canadian scenery, and sent to New York. Forty-five were chosen 
as a set to go the rounds of the interchange. Five slides were chosen for 

18 E. 



228 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



the European set. At intervals during the year meetings were held at 
which sets of slides were shown and instructive demonstrations were given, 
including : 

(a) Toning Development-Out paper, A. G. Alexander. 

(b) Development of under and over exposed plates, J. G. Gadsby. 

(c) Making of Lantern Slides, J. H. Land. 

Improvements have been made in the dark room, including a new zinc 
developing table, twelve new lockers, several large developing trays and 
graduates. 

Outing. — An enjoyable outing was- held at Guelph on Victoria Day. 

Annual Exhibition. — The annual print exhibition was held on the 24th 
25th and 26th March, and was largely attended by the members and the 
public. 

Astronomical Section.— This section had a busy year. Fourteen meet- 
ings were held at which papers were read. Large audiences attended all 
these meetings. 

Their annual report was printed at a cost of about $200.00, and circu- 
lated as usual. 

Receipts, including government grant, $648.91; expenditure, $648.73; 
balance on hand, 18 cents. 

2. Ottawa Literary and Scientific Society. 

Ottawa Literary and Scientific Society report shows that there are 258 
members. The library is open daily and contains 4,755 books, besides many 
valuable unbound pamphlets and other publications received in exchange 
frdm corresponding societies." The number of volumes issued was 4,403, 
and 1,400 current reviews and magazines. 

The reading room is open daily (Sunday excepted) from 8.30 a.m. to 
10 p.m. It is supplied with all the leading periodicals and papers, and is 
largely attended by the members. The magazines, etc., not bound for the 
library were sold by tender to the members. 

Lectures. — A very attractive and instructive course of lectures was ar- 
ranged, and these were given weekly during the winter, and were more than 
usually well attended. The lecture by Prof. McNaughton was delivered 
in the Assembly Hall of the Normal School, but all the others were given 
in the Society's library. 

The programme was as follows : 

(1) Impressions of the British House of Commons, Hon. Sir Louis 
Davies, K.C.M.G. 

(2) A Bundle df Old Letters, Eev. G. F. Salton, Ph.B. 

(3) Our Forests and their Preservation (with lantern views), Dr. Robert 
Bell, I.S.O., F.R.S., F.R.S.C., &c. 

(4) Colour Values by Photography (with lantern views), J. S. Plaskett, 
B.A. 

(5) Browning and the Historical Spirit, Prof. John McNaughton, M.A., 
fMcGill Univ.) 

(6) Glimpses of South America, Dr. Leonard Vaux. 

(7) Romance and Realism in Fiction, Rev. R. J. Hutcheon, M.A. 

(8) Types of Empire, Thos. MacFarlane, M.E., F.R.S.C. 

(9) Student Life in Paris, Harold Routh, B.A., (Bishop's College Len- 
noxville). 

The last lecture was a special one delivered under the patronage of Hit 
Lordship the Bishop of Ottawa, who presided as Hon. Chairman. 
18 aE. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 229 



The member's fees have been raised to $3.00 per annum, which includes 
attendance to lectures, with all privileges of library, reading room, etc. 

Voluntary subscriptions of $177.00 were received during the year; this 
amount was applied to the purchase of new books. 

The Treasurer's statement shows that the receipts, including govern- 
ment grant, were $1,010.45; expenditure, $907.07; balance on hand, $103.38. 

I recommended the officers I met to try and amalgamate with the Field 
Naturalists' Club and the public library, so that their extensive library 
would be of more value to the public. 

3. L'Institut Canadien Francaise, Ottawa. 

The annual report of the L'Institut Canadien Francaise shows that they 
had a disastrous fire in February, destroying their furniture and damaging 
the library, which loss they consider irreparable, especially as regards many 
rrire and valuable books and documents which were destroyed and injured. 

It is gratifying to state that on my visit in December they had gi\en 
up their temporary rooms and everything is now in working order, and, al- 
though the insurance received was inadequate to meet losses, they are hope- 
ful 'for the future. 

In consequence of the conflagration the attendance was not so large as 
formerly, but they succeeded in giving a course of twelve lectures, as fol- 
lows : 

(1) "The Dreyfus Affair," Auguste Lemieux. 

(2) "Leo XIII. and the Papacy," Rev. Father Lecocq. 

(3) "Brussels," Mr. Edouard F. Surveyer. 

(4) "France," Mr. A. D. DeCelles. 

(5) "Hieroglyphics," Rev. Father Yan Bacelaere. 

(6) "A Trip to the North Pole," Capt. Bernier. 

(7) "Women of the XYIIth Century in France," Miss Yianzone (Prof, 
of French Literature in St. Petersburg Univ.) 

(8) ''Artistic Sense of the French Canadian Artisan," M. E. Bouchette. 

(9) "Lecture on Elocution," Miss St. Jean. 

(10) "The Feminism," Rev. Father Delor. 

(11) "Che Lachaud," the great French Lawyer, Auguste Lemieux. 

(12) "Poetry," Henri Desjardins. 

The Treasurer's report shows that receipts were $1,483.65; expenditure, 
$2 127.30. The deficit for repairs to building, etc., is $643.65. 

4. St. Patrick's Literary and Scientific Association. 

('itawa. — The annual report of this association shows that, although 
they expended during the year over $3,000.00 for their new building they 
still have a balance on hand. 

The officers and members of the association are to be congratulated on 
hjvlr.g erected a spacious building, with all modern improvements, which 
cost over $30,000.00, and has been paid for through the strenuous efforts 
of the officers and the liberal assistance of the members. 

They have an excellent Library, with modern equipments, containing 
1,596 books; also a first class reading room well patronized. 

The lectures are well attended. 

The Treasurer's report shows that the receipts were $4,106.36; expen- 
diture, $4,001.65; balance on hand, $104.71. 



230 1HE RKFORT OF THE No. 12 



5. Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club. 

The report of the council of the Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club for the 
year ending 15th March, 1904, shows that the club has now completed its 
twenty-fifth year. The completion of a quarter of a century of active or- 
ganized work was fittingly celebrated by the members of the club. The 
first of the winter soirees was addressed by speakers who were all members 
of the first council, and each told briefly of some c-f the many changes of the 
past twenty-five years, and the part the club has taken in leading and direct- 
ing scientific thought during that time. 

During the year special efforts have been put forth towards enlisting 
the teachers and students of the various educational institutions in the work 
i'i the club. This has been done by numerous field excursions, lectures 
and demonstrations, and the addition of a Nature Study department to the 
Ottawa Naturalist. The result has been to diffuse the work into new chan- 
nels. A number of the teachers of the city have taken their classes afield 
for an afternoon's study of the birds, insects, flowers, trees, rocks, soil, 
etc., of some locality. 

Membership. — The total membership is now 266, composed of 258 ordin- 
ary members and eight corresponding. 

Winter Soirees. — Fortnightly meetings were held through the winter, 
and were largely attended by members and the general public. 

The following is the programme of the past winter : 

December 15th. Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Founding of the Club. 

Address oif Welcome by Principal J. F. White, of the Normal School. 

The President's Address. 

The Study of Natural History at Ottawa before the formation of the 
Club. Lieut.-Col. White, C.M.G. 

Botanical conditions round Ottawa twenty-five years ago. R. B. White. 

Ottawa as a Natural History Locality twenty-five years ago. Dr. 
James Fletcher. 

The Workers in Natural History at Ottawa twenty-five years ago. Lieut.- 
Col. W. P. Anderson.. 

What the Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club has accomplished. Dr. H. 
B. Small. 

1904. 

Jan. 5. The Difference and Correspondences between the Avi- 
fauna of Ottawa and of the Maryland Alleghanies. Rev. G. Eifrig. 

Report of the Geological Branch. 

Jan. 19. The recent Landslide on the Lievre River. Illustrated by 
lantern slides. Dr. A. E. Barlow. 

Report of the Ornithological Branch. 

Feb. 2. Sap and Sap Circulation. F. T. Shutt, M.A. 

Two Springs. Dr. C. Guillet. 

Feb. 16. A Summer's Cruise on the Labrador Coast. Illustrated by 
lantern slides. Dr. R. A. Daly. 

Mar. 1. Colour in Nature. Dr. .S. B. Sinclair. 

Report of the Entomological Branch.- 

March. 15. Annual meeting. 

Report of the Zoological Branch. 

Report of the Botanical Branch. 



190* " EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



231 



P, Wn ^ Talks <m how to Collect and Preserve Specimens, with 
l racticaJ Demonstrations by various members of the Club 

The members of the Entomological Branch have been very active dur- 
ng the year. Fortnightly house meetings have been held during the win- 
ter and at severa interesting papers were read. There has been a renewed 
elot !1£ .eollectinjT ami studying the insects of the Ottawa Districted 
good work has also been done by outside members. The leaders have all 

list? oSect? y aCUye attd ^ additi ° nS haW beeB made t0 the local 

»,-n. Tlle ^ G T 10gi0al B i anoh , report sWs that leader s attended the excur- 
sions. & ^ "" ^ USU&1 '° ined the Geol °8'ical Sections on these 

The Ornithological Branch also had leaders at the different excursions 
to aid in the identification of birds seen and heard. Through the aid of 
the Honourable Frank Latchford arrangements have been made for the 
appointment of a special officer to enforce the Provincial Act That prohibits 
the destruction or trapping of useful birds. proniDits 

The Ottawa Naturalist.— The seventeenth volume of the Ottawa Natura- 
list has been completed. It contains twelve numbers of two hundred and 
twenty-eight pages with eight plates. 

Excursions—Nine sub-excursions were held during the year- these 
excursions were to places, in the immediate vicinity ofOttawa?£d we e 
highly successful. Special attention was given to the forest trees their 

tTie buds gr °Th 1^ ^ Va i i0US meanS ° f ld -tifying them "especially by 
«ie buds The two general excursions were to Chelsea and Avlmer the 

nTfneSjtt 6 ^ ^^ ^^ by °™ ttoe ^^ member 

to Nature Stud v TMi ^T ^«T U 1 « TO aa excellent introduction 
to JNature btudy Full accounts of the localities visited and the work done 
at Uum outings have appeared from time to time in the Ottawa Naturalist 

a wid?fiid%t t a SeVe T l B r CkeS - The W ° rk ° f the Ranches cSrs 
several of fL lB b ° tan ^ al se °t 10 * was , exceptionally fortunate in having 
nZT- I * he i ead 1 ers m 9 itava du »"ar the entire season. Prof John Ma? 
conn, m his official capacity, spent the summer in Ottawa and vicinity m ak- 
ng a special study of the fungi. He added over two hundred Sies to 
the Ottawa flora. Dr. James Fletcher has continued his studies of violets 
and done much toward the differentiation of species. Dr C Guilkha 
devoted much time to penological observations, and Mr. DA Campbell 

held >tTt ° l08y J l pUn K Durin = the ™ ter ^eral meetingT^" 
iZJ fi meS f ^ e ? embers - At each meeting a paper was rfadTnd 

6. Ottawa University Society. 

The report of the Ottawa University Societv shows +W «,„ i. 

met once a week to discuss scientific subjects. 3 ' ^ memWs 

student o^uiy^ ™ ^ *"*« ^ ^ '° ™ mh ™ a » d 

S ^^S^^:!!^^' J A- Laieunesse. 



232 lhl tt KURORT Ob THE No. 12 



(3) "Hydraulics," The Evolution of the Water-Wheel, C. J. Jones. 

(4) "Zoology," The Ruminants of the Dominion, 0. Seguin. 

(5) "Training and its Effects," Rev. J. A. Lajeunesse. 

(6) "Chemistry and Physics in Magic," with experiments, R. Brynes 

(7) "Carlyle's Estimate of Cromwell," Prof. Gray. 

(8) 'Phosphorous and its uses," Rev. G. Gauvreau. 

(9) "Rock Desintegration and formation of Soils," A. McDonald. 
(10; "The X-Rays," Dr. M. 0. Boyle. 

(11) "Ancient Rome," illustrated, Rev. C. Sherry, D.D. 

The annual excursion of the Society was held at Pelissier's Cave, 25 
miles from Ottawa, and the programme was carried out under most favor- 
able conditions. 

The main building of the University of Ottawa was destroyed by fire 
on the 2nd of December. The Scientific Society loses its library contain- 
ing about 1,000 books, two valuable cameras, photograph apparatus, 250 
lantern slides, and miscellaneous apparatus, which, unfortunately, were 
not insured. 

As soon as the new building is finished they intend having weekly lec- 
tures, and will give public entertainments to assist them in purchasing new 
apparatus, etc. 

Receipts, including government grant, $136.00; expenditure, $131.55; 
balance on hand, $4.45. 

7. Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Toronto. 

This Society, formerly known as the Toronto Astronomical Society ^ sent 
a petition to His Excellency, the Governor-General, in January, 1903, re- 
questing a change of name to "Royal Astronomical Society of Canada." 
The petitioners show (1) that they encourage research and original work 
and publish transactions for distribution to members and scientific societies 
throughout the world; (2) That they have promoted the formation of other 
societies with similar aims; (3) That they have a library of standard works, 
maps, charts, globes, etc., to which the public have access; (4) That the 
petitioners have refracting and reflecting telescopes and other instrumental 
apparatus; (5) That fortnightly meetings are held at which papers are read 
and discussed, except in the months of July and August, when open-air 
meetings are held; (6) That they are in correspondence with more than one 
hundred societies and observatories in many countries, with which it ex- 
changes reports. 

In reply to the petition the following letter was received : 

Ottawa, 27th February, 1903. 

Sir, — Referring to the recent petition of the Toronto Astronomical So- 
ciety to be allowed to use the prefix "Royal" I have now the honor to in- 
form you that the Governor-General has received a dispatch from the Sec- 
retary of State for the Colonies acquainting His Excellency that His Majesty 
the King has been graciously pleased to grant permission to the Toronto 
Astronomical Society to adopt the title cxf the Royal Astronomical Society 
of Canada. 

(Signed) Joseph Pope, 

Under-Secretary of State. 
R. F. Stupart, Esq., F.R.S.C, 

President Toronto Astronomical Society, Toronto, Ont. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 233 



The following papers were read and discussed in 1903 : 

(1) Experiments with Physical Apparatus. A. F. Miller. 

(2) President's Address. R. F. Stupart. 

(3) Celestial Measurements. Prof. A. T. DeLury. 

(4) Stellar Motions. A. F. Miller. 

(5) Astronomy of Milton. J. A. Paterson, M.A. 

(6) The Diatonic Scale. Geo. A. Anderson, M.A. 

(7) Is the Moon a Dead World. J. E. Maybee, M.E. 

(8) Stellar Motions. A. F. Miller. 

(9) Man's Place in the Universe. Messrs. Lumsden and Collins. 

(10) The adjustment of the Equatorial Telescope. F. L. Blake, D.L.S. 

(11) Potation, a misleading term as applied to the Sun. A. Harvey, 
F.R.S.C. 

(12) Helmholtz. Rev. P. Atkinson. 

(13) An Evening with the Spectroscope. A. F. Miller. 

(14) Pleasures of the Telescope. Dr. A. D. Watson. 

(15) Stonehenge. J. C. Hamilton, LL.D. 

(16) Radium and Astronomical Physics. J. R. Collins. 

(17) Uranoliths (aerolites). A. Harvey, F.R.S.C. 

(18) The Nature of Ether Yibrations. C. A. Chant, M.A. 

(19) Women's Work in Astronomy. Miss Elsie A. Dent. 

(20) How I built and equipped my Observatory at Hamilton. D. B. 
Marsh, Ph.D. 

(21) Notes on a visit to Greenwich Observatory. J. A. Paterson, M.A. 
Receipts, including government grant, $749.47; expenditure, $714.44; 

balance on hand, $35.03. 

8. Toronto Canadian Institute. 

The report of the Canadian Institute shows that the year 1903 was pros- 
perous, both as to the excellence of the papers read and the audiences which 
attended. 

The opening lecture by Dr. L. O. Howard, Director of the Bureau of 
Entomology, Washington, on "The importation of Pests and Insects/' was 
much appreciated. 

The Institute is greatly indebted to Sir Sandford Fleming for an in- 
vestment which provides an income making it possible to pay the expenses 
of emenient men of science from points outside of Toronto. 

During the year twenty-four papers were read, as follows : Geology, 
Physiography, etc., 5; Biology and Related Sciences, 4; Physics, 4; Econ- 
omics, 2; Bibliography and History, 2; Photography, 1; Ethics, 1; Mis- 
cellaneous, 5. 

The natural history section held general meetings at which paj>ers, etc., 
were given as follows : 

(1) Exhibition of specimens and Microscopic objects. 

(2) President's Address and paper on "The Auks and Guillemots." 
John Maughan, Sen. 

(3) Exhibition of Specimens. 

(4) Paper on "Oil Wells." S. Dillon-Mills, M.E. 

(5) "The Cuckoos, and their distribution." J. B. Williams, F.Z.S. 

(6) An evening with the Microscope. 

(7) "Our Native Ferns." Miss Wilkes. 

(8) An evening in the University Museum. 

(9) "Vegetable Parasites." C. Armstrong. 
HO) "The Falconidae." John Maughan, Jur. 



234 iH ^ REPORT Ur THE No. 12 



(11) "Notes on the Amoeba." S. Dillon-Mills, M.E. 

(12) "Canadian Woodpeckers." J. B. "Williams, F.Z.S. 
(13) "Evolution of the Cedars." E. C. Jeffrey. 

All the lectures were illustrated. 

In addition to the above three special meetings were held. 
During the summer the following excursions were made by the members 
of the section accompanied by their friends : Alton, Riviere Rouge, The 
Old Mill on the Humber, The Humber, Niagara Falls, (Foster's Flats), 
Hemlock Grove Farm, Weston. 

The librarian reports as follows : 1,085 volumes and periodicals were 
loaned, 120 volumes were donated to the library, 163 volumes were bound. 
Total number of exchanges from scientific societies in different parts of 
the world, 2,290. 

Receipts, including government grant, ^9.393.03; expenditure, $2,- 
387.92; balance on hand, $5.11. 

9. Wellington Field Naturalists' Club, Guelph. 

This Society was paid a special grant of $100 i 00, and reports that fort- 
nightly meetings have been held at which papers on Botany, Ornithology 
ana Mammalogy were read and discussed. During the summer field work 
was done. 

10. Historical Societies. 

Legislative grants have been naid to Historical Societies as follows : 

1. London and Middlesex Historical Society „ ...$100.00 

2. Lundy's Lane Historical Society. 200.00 

3. Niagara Historical Society...... 100.00 

Niagara Historical Society, special grant 500.00 

4. Ontario Historical Society 600.00 

5. Wentworth Historical Society... 100 00 

6. Woman's Canadian Historical Society 100.00 



APPENDIX J.— REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN OF THE 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 

To the Honorable Robert A. Pyne, M.D., M.P.P., 

Minister of Education focr the Province of Ontario. 

I have the honor to submit herewith the report on the library of the 
Education Department for the year 1904 : 

Yearly Record of Books Loaned to Students and Others. 

In the following table a record is given of the number of books loaned 
during the years 1895-1904, to the students of the Normal and Model schools, 
and to the teachers and other persons. A record of each book "*iven out is 
made in a register, the parties borrowing books signing their names, by 
way of receipt, and as a guarantee that they will return the books in a given 
time. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



235 



Books given out in 
the month of — 



Jan nary . . 
February . 
March..". . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 

Totals 



1895 1896 is!) 7 L898 L899 



354 

804 

1,034 

627 

633 

354 

223 

100 

415 

1,130 

1,063 

597 



7,334 



573 
1,0-10 
1,270 
1,021 

843 

400 
32 
16 

295 
1,170 
1,268 

752 



,680 



699 

1,370 

1,702 

1,111 

923 

609 

254 

184 

514 

1,200 

1,099 

704 



10,369 



608 

969 

677 
265 
233 

410 
1,043 
1,024 

464 



4S-1 

868 

1,158 

848 

895 

5 1 8 

256 

329 

489 

1,018 

1,034 

549 



L900 1901 



8,896 8,44( 



526 

94S 

1,454 

766 

911 

231 
224 
432 
1,312 
1,229 
547 



1902 



9,120 



518 
1,124 
1,563 
997 
867 
576 
3171 

411 
L,058 
1,014 

516 



9,137 



542 

959 

1,084 

1.187 

832 

510 

336 

233 

538 

958 

1,158 

535 



,872 



1903 1904 



587 
1,036 

1,538 
899 
901 
591 
his 
152 
476 
761 
687 
600 



8.396 



673 

970 
978 
854 
738 
482 
220 
259 
378 
776 
900 
480 



7,708 



Fully one thousand university students and others interested in educa- 
tion generally patronized the library during the year, while a larger number 
visited it and consulted the various works of reference. 

Number and Subjects of the Books Purchased in the Years 1892-1904. 



Subjects 



Education, 

Science, 

Literature, 

Art, 

Text-books, 

Miscellaneous. 



Year. Volumes. 

1892 388 

1893 290 

1894.... ;... 257 

1895 430 

1896 495 

1897 k :...... 476 

1898 533 

1899 315 

1900 275 

1901 164 

1902.: 304 

1903 218 

1904 409 

It will be seen in the following table that large accessions have been 
made to the library in Fiction and Literature. This was rendered neces- 
sary in order to meet a demand for the better class of current fiction and to 
replace worn-out books which had to be discarded. 

The Number of Books 'Purchased in 1900-1904 was as follows 



Subjects. 



etc. 



Pedagogy . , 

Science, (Political Economy, Anthropology 

Philosophy and Ethics 

Industrial and Domestic Science 

Poetry 

Fiction and Practical Life 

Literature ... 

Text-Books .... 

Miscellaneous (History, Biography, Reference Works) 

Natural History and Nature-Study 

Arts '. 



Totals. 



1900 1901 



23 

24 

5 

23 

18 
26 
78 
65 
13 



275 



29 
8 

12 
2 
1 
5 
3 

32 

72 



1902 



40 

11 

9 

8 

1 

9 

46 

45 

102 

33 



164 304 



1903 



7 

3 

8 

6 

10 

19 

35 

27 

61 

27 

15 



218 



1904 



18 
10 
17 
24 
13 
79 
92 
37 
84 
20 
15 



409 



236 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



The large increase in the number of text books donated to the library 
as set forth in the subjoined table is accounted for by the fact that your 
predecessor, the Hon. R. Harcourt, while in England in 1904, made ar- 
rangements with Messrs. Adam & Charles Black, & Longmans, Green & Co., 
of London, England, to place the text books published b-- them on the 
shelves of the library for examination by those interested. 



Number of Books Donated to the Library 1898-1904 : 





1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


Text-Books . . 


49 


74 


65 

• 7 


111 
13 


41 
54 


144 
95 


349 


Miscellaneous . 


16 










Totals 


49 


74 


72 


124 


95 


239 


"365 







Newspapers and Magazines Received during- the Years 1900-1904 



— 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


Number of daily and weekly newspapers received 

Number of magazines and other periodicals received 


86 
100 


91 
102 


88 
100 


89 
111 


109 
94 


Totals . 


186 


193 


188 200 


203 











Books, Magazines, etc., Bound during the Years 1893-1904: 



1893 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


109 136 

1 


.141 


98 


99 


90 


94 


37 


83 


71 


4 


81 



Official Reports on Education in Different Countries Received during 1901-1904 



— ■ 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


(Treat Britain and Ireland 


26 

42 


43 

42 

5 

3 
1 
1 


53 

45 

3 
2 


59 


Various Provinces of the Dominion 

Australasia — 

Victoria 


31 

9 


New South Wales 


1 


3 

1 


Western Australia 

Queensland 

Tasmania 


1 

1 
1 
9 


1 

2 


1 
29 

1 

I 

1 


'18 .' 


2 


New Zealand 


26 


Other British Possessions : 




Cape of Good Hope 

Natal 


1 
1 

2 


9 

1 

1 

12 

1 

1 


2 

1 


Jamaica 


1 

1 


Barbadoes 


1 
1 

1 


1 

2 


1 


British Guinea 


1 






Hong Kong 


1 







1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



287 



Official Reports on Education in Different Countries Received during 1901-1904 

Concluded. 



Transvaal 

Various States of the American Union 
Miscellaneous : 

Brazil 

Argentine Republic 

Uruguay 

France 

Germany 

Portugal 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Mexico 

Japan 



Total? 



1901 



1902 



117 



16 
1 



54 



3 
12 



2 

6 

29 

1 



247 248 



1905 



si 



10 
5 
4 
1 
2 
2 

L6 



263 



L904 



1 
65 



21' 



Miscellaneous Pamphlets Received in 1901-1904 : 



— 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


From various Countries 


80 
28 


75 
74 


65 
53 


12 


From the Dominion of Canada and its Provinces 


27 


Totals 


108 


149 


118 


39 







Many Art books (a list of which, is appended) illustrating, in many cases, 
the best productions of the world's greatest landscape and portrait paint- 
ers are conspicuously displayed and made easily accessible to all visitors 
to the library whether teachers, students or other persons. These works 
have an elevating and refining influence, and are much appreciated and 
enjoyed by our visitors. 

1, England's History, as pictured by famous painters; 2, Glimpses of 
Canada; 3, Glimpses of the World; 4, America's Wonderland; 5, Beautiful 
Britain ; 6, Sights and Scenes in England and Wales ; 7, Photographs of 
portraits of the Lieutenant-Governors of Upper Canada, 1792-1841, Gover- 
Governor-Generals of United Canada, 1841-1867, Lieutenant-Governors of 
Ontario, 1867-1902 ; 8, Photographs of the Algoma Legislative tour ; 9, Sights 
and Scenes of Oxford City and University; 10, California and Alaska; 11, 
Americans, Charles Dana Gibson ; 12, The Weaker Sex, Charles 
Dana Gibson ; 13, Gainsborough, Constable and Turner; 14, Notes 
on European Picture Galleries; 15, The Madonna in Art, Hurll; 
16, Child Life in Art, Hurll; 17, Love in Art, Potter; 18, Saints in Art, 
Clement; 19, Heroines of the Bible in Art, Clement; 20, Shakespeare in 
Art, Sadakichi Hartmann; 21, Angels in Art, Clement: 22, Christ in Art, 
French; Riverside Art Series, 12 volumes by Estelle Hurll: 23, Raphael: 
24, Rembrandt; 25, Michael Angelo; 26, Reynolds; 27, Murillo; 28, Greek 
Sculpture; 29, Titian; 31, Landseer; 32, Tuscan Sculpture; 33, Van Dvck; 
34, Correggio; 35, A Popular Handbook to the National Gallery; 36, Mem- 
oirs of Italian Painters, Anna Jameson; 37, Life and Correspondence of 
J. M W. Turner, Thornbury; 38. Life's Roses, a volume of selected poetry: 
39, The Makers of British Art, Landseer: 40, The Makers of British Art, 
Turner: 41, The Makers of British Art, Romney: 42, British Painters of 



238 'A'Hii REPORT Ob THE No. 12 



the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries; 43, Tennyson's Heroes and Her- 
oines; 44, The Voice of the Sea; 45, Pictures in the Wallace Collection; 
46, A Dog Day; 47, Art Pictorial and Industrial; 48, Literary Landmarks 
of Oxford; 49, Royal Academy Pictures; 50, Four American Universities; 
51, Newnes' Art Library, Botticilli; 52, Newnes' Art Library, Sir Joshua 
Reynolds; 53, Newnes' Art Library, Yelasquez; 54, John Leech's Pictures 
of Life and Character, from the collection of Mr. Punch, 3 volumes; 55, The 
Heart of Hyacinthe, Onoto Watanna; 56, The Old Country House, Richard 
Le Gallienne; 57, Phil May's Sketch Book, 2 copies; 58, The Background 
of Literature, H. M. Mabie; 59, Masterpieces of the Great Artists; 60, The 
uenius of J. M. W. Turner; 61, The Pilgrim's Progress, Bunyan; 62, Rare 
Cartoons of Canadian History; 63, Paris, Grant Allen, 2 volumes; 64, Bel- 
gium, Grant Allen, 2 volumes; 65, Salons Colonial and Republican; 66, 
The Life of the Ancient Mexicans; 67, Robert Burns, rare print collection; 
68, The Art of the Pitti Palace, Julia deW. Addison; 69, Japan, the Place 
and its People, G. Waldo Brown; 70, Holland, Nico Jungman; 71, Happy 
England, as painted by Helen Allingham and Marcus B. Huish; 72, The 
Hundred Best Pictures; 73, George Morland, G. C. Wlliamson; 74, A 
Souvenir of Canadian Cities, J. Phillips; 75, Westminster Abbey, painted 
by J. Eulleylove, R.I., described by Mrs. A. Murray Smith; 76, The Cathe- 
drals of England, M. J. Taber; 77, Great Englishmen of the Sixteenth Cen- 
tury, Sidney Lee; 78, Pictures of the Tate Gallery; 79, The Old Masters 
and Their Pictures; 80, Great Masters in Painting and Sculpture; 81, The 
British Isles. 

On taking charge of the library last year I made an examination of the 
books in order to ascertain how far they met the requirements of a "student's 
library," as that is the primary object of the existence of the library of the 
Education Department. 

I have come lo the conclusion that while there are works in the library 
of great value to the student body, there are many others which should 
have a place on its shelves. 

Before attempting to recommend the purchase of new books it was 
necessary to relieve the library of many books, reports, newspaper fyles, 
etc., which were the accumulation of years, and which, while valuable in 
themselves, were unsuitable for a library originated with the object of help- 
ing the student in his work from day to day. 

How to get rid of this material was a problem, but a problem that, 
after all, was soon solved. Mr. Alexender Eraser, the Provincial Archi- 
vist, regarded this literature as being of special value to his department, 
and it was at once transferred there. A list of what was sent to the Bureau 
of Archives is given in this report. 

Working Rules for the Library. 

1. The library shall be educational, adapted more particularly to the 
wants of the student body. 

2. Every effort shall be made to build up a library which shall touch 
the life and work of the student at every point throughout the whole course 
of professional studies. 

3. The seminary idea of institutional libraries shall be followed as far 
as accommodation and convenience will allow. 

4. Special arrangements will be made for the wants of teachers and 
officials. 

5. The shelving arrangement shall be based on the decimal system 
under a topical classification. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 239 



6. In expending the annual appropriation the librarian shall give first 
consideration to the purchase of books in current use by the students and 
teachers. 

7. Should special outlays be required the Hon. the Minister of Educa- 
tion shall be consulted, and his consent obtained. 

8. Quarterly catalogues shall be prepared and made accessible to the 
students. 

9. An accession and a stock book will be kept, into which every book, 
etc., under the control of the library, will be entered. 

10. The librarian shall prepare an annual report, which shall be sub- 
mitted to the Hon. the Minister of Education for publication as an appendix 
to the Minister's annual report. 

11. The librarian shall be held responsible for the library and its work- 
ing, and shall be directly accountable to the Hon. the Minister of Education. 

Henry R. Alley, 

Librarian. 

Under instructions from the Ex-Minister of Education the following 
distribution of works and newspapers from this library was made to the in- 
stitutions, newspaper offices and persons named : 

To the Industrial School at Mimico some forty-four volumes, partly 
worn, of Dickens, Scott and Thackeray's works. 

To the University of Ottawa, which lost its library by fire, the reports of 
the Chief Superintendent and Minister of Education for the years 1845 to 
1902, inclusive ; Journal of Education, 1848 to 1877 ; Documentary History 
of Education in Upper Canada, vols. 2 to 10; Vassar's Lives of the Painters, 
2 vols. ; Reports of Commissioner of Education at Washington, 6 vols. ; Smith- 
sonian Reports, 3 vols. ; Hodgin's Report on Ontario at Philadelphia Ex- 
hibition of 1876 ; Departmental Statutes and School Regulations, 1891-1896 ; 
Normal School Jubilee Report, 1897; Hodgin's Ryerson Memorial Volume; 
Hodgin's School Architecture, 1876-1886; Revised School Law of 1885; Mil- 
lar's School System of New York; Hodgin's School Manuals, 1861-1864; 
Onxario Scripture Readings; Les Guepes Canadiennes, by Aug. Laperriere; 
Hodgin's Separate Schools in Upper Canada, 1897; Lectures and Reports 
on Education, by Horace Mann; University Problems, by Daniel C. Gil- 
man; Universities of Canada, Great Britain and the United States, by G. 
Vv . Ross; Handbook of Canada, 1897. 

To Victoria University, Toronto, bound volumes of the New York Meth- 
odist, 1868-9; London Weekly Herald and Evangelical Witness, 1872; Tor- 
onto Christian Guardian, four volumes; Toronto Christian Journal, 1872-5; 
Toronto Church Herald, 1873-4; Toronto Church, 1843-7; Canadian Baptist, 
1872-5; Hamilton Christian Advocate, 1870-5; London, Ont., Evangelical 
Witness, 1873-4; Toronto British American Presbyterian, 1873-5; Montreal 
(jazette, 1870-6. In all 20 volumes. 

To the Globe Printing Company, Toronto, fyles of the Globe, 1864 to 
1874, inclusive, 10 volumes. 

To the Spectator Printing Company, Hamilton, fyles of the Spectator for 
the years 1851-57, 1860, 1871-76. 14 volumes. 

To Alexander Fraser, Esq., M.A., Provincial Archivist, Parliament 
Buildings, January 12th, 1904. . 21 odd departmental reports, volumes 2 
io 10 of the Documentary History of Education in Upper Canada, Reports 
of the Chief Superintendent and Minister of Education for the years 1847 
to 1902, Journal df Education, Upper Canada, 1848 to 1877, a set of Modern 
Public School Text Books, 17 volumes, a set of 15 volumes of Modern High 
School Text Books, 19 volumes of old Public and Hig-h School Text Books. 



240 THE REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. No, 12 



To Mr. Fraser, November 4th, 1904 : Bound volumes of the New York 
Methodist, New York Observer, New York Times, New Y"ork Albion, Tor- 
onto Daily Telegraph, Toronto Mail, Toronto Leader, London Free Press, 
London Advertiser, London Prototype, London Weekly Herald and Proto- 
type, London Weekly Herald, Toronto National, Toronto Canadian Free- 
man, Toronto Mirror, Toronto Express, Toronto British Colonist, Belleville 
Intelligencer, Peterboro' Review, Brantford Courier, Brockville Recorder, 
Port Hope Times, Stratford Beacon, Woodstock Times, Kingston Chronicle 
and News, Ottawa Times, Ottawa Daily Citizen, Journal de Quebec, London 
Eng.) Watchman, London (Eng.) Evening Mail, Montreal Canadian Cour- 
ant, Toronto Irish Canadian, Montreal Argus, Montreal Weekly Witness, 
Montreal True Witness, Toronto Echo, New York Weekly Review, The 
Fredericton (N.B.) Headquarters, in all about 108 volumes. 

To Mr. Fraser, November 22nd, 1904 : History of Public Offices, 1846 
"Report on Public Departments, 1839; 22 volumes Ontario Gazette, 1889 
lSbt); 23 volumes Canada Gazette, 1841-1863; Bills of Canada, 2 volumes 
8 volumes Canadian Reports of Commissioners, 1828-1853; 16 volumes Par- 
liamentary Papers relating to Canada, 1828-1844; Reports of Finance, 1850 
6 volumes of Imperial Parliamentary Papers relating to Canada, 1784, 1828- 
1835, 1836; Public Accounts, Canada, 1839-51; 2 volumes Canadian Parlia- 
mentary Papers, 1812-1819; 13 volumes United States Pacific Railroad Sur- 
veys; 10 volumes of United States Senate Reports of Meteorological Obser- 
vations, 1854-59; 12 volumes United States Coast Surveys; Miscellaneous 
Collection of old English Colonial Reports; Miscellaneous Collection of old 
Canadian Blue Books. 

To Mr. Fraser, November 24th, 1904 : 23 pamphlet cases on Canadian 
Pacific Railway, Intercolonial, Grand Trunk, Great Western and other 
Canadian railways, a large number of old Toronto and other Canadian direc- 
iories, Chambers' Political Annals, 1763, English Blue Books relating to 
Colonies, miscellaneous collection United States Reports. 

Sent to Mr. Fraser, December 15th, 1904 : Dawson's Lake Superior and 
Red River Report of 1850; Maps of Canada, 1857; 6 volumes of Journals 
^nd Appendices of Lower Canada, 1834-37; 2 volumes of Volunteer Review; 
3 volumes of New York Albion ; 6 volumes of Maps of Canada, 1857 : 5 vol- 
umes of Plans to Geological Reports, 1857; 2 volumes Les Ursulines de Que- 
bec, 1864; 26 volumes of Geological Reports of Canada, 1870 to 1900; sur- 
plus numbers of Dominion Sessional Papers, also miscellaneous Parliamen- 
tary Papers and Blue Books. 

HISTORIOGRAPHY. 

The eleventh volume of the "Documentary History of Education in 
Upper Canada," covering the years 1853-55, was published during the year. 
A,s the Editor remarks in the Preface, "This volume marks a new epoch in 
the progress and expansion of education in this province. In it are re- 
corded the various steps, incidentally taken, and, to a certain extent, with- 
out concert among the educational authorities, to bring about a greatly im- 
proved state of things. Not only the condition, but the status and future 
of elementary education were specifically dealt with, and intermediate edu- 
cation also received a new impulse in the organization, and consequent im- 
provement in the condition of the County Grammar Schools. Higher edu- 
cation, also, received at the same time a larsre share of attention : the whole 
course of instruction in the University of Toronto was thoroui?hlv revised, 
so as to adjust the curriculum to the needs of the country, and also to pro- 
duce a degree of harmony^not hitherto attained — in the working of the 
various Departments of the University." 



REPORT 



OF THE 



MINISTER OF EDUCATION 



For the Year 1904. 



PART II 



APPENDIX K— MANUAL TRAINING AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 

Report or the Inspector. 

Hon. E, A. Pyne, M.D., M.P.P., 

Minister of Education, Toronto. 

Sir, — I beg to submit herewith my fourth Annual Report on Manual 
Training, Technical Education and Art Instruction as carried on in the 
schools of this Province. 

Considerable progress has been made, and though much remains to be 
done before these subjects are generally adopted and efficiently taught, the 
result so far achieved may fairly be regarded as satisfactory. Teachers are 
conservative. Changes in educational method and practice are of jsldw 
growth and rightly so. Each change made should receive the most careful 
consideration and nothing new introduced simply because it is new. 

Four years ago there was not a single Manual Training School or House- 
hold Science department in the Province. To-day there are in active opera- 
tion over thirty schools in which Manual Training is taken and eighteen in 
which Household Science is taught, while several other educational authori- 
ties are considering the advisability of their introduction. All these schools 
receive generous aid from the Department, and it is only by the continuance 
of this aid that these necessarily expensive subjects can be further introduc- 
ed and extended. The difficulties in the way do not usually arise from the 
disinclination of the people. On the contrary there exists an earnest desire 
in many quarters that these branches should be included in the curriculum. 
1 E. (II) [241] 



242 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



They are optional and for many years must remain so. It is only as the 
benefits arising from them come to be understood and the difficulties in the 
way of their introduction gradually removed, that we can hope for their gen- 
eral adoption. The main obstacles seem to be as follows : — 

1. The necessarily expensive equipment. 

2. The provision of suitable accommodation. 

3. The scarcity of qualified teachers. 

The cost of the equipment is being largely met by grants from the De- 
partment and in this connection it should be remembered that efficiency, 
stability and permanence are the only tests of cheapness. The best will al- 
ways be found to be the cheapest and in many cases the saving of a few dol- 
lars in the initial cost of the equipment has been found to entail a much 
greater expense later on, in the way of repairs, adjustments and alterations. 

Many schools anxious to take up the work have all their available ac- 
commodation taxed to the utmost capacity. Under these circumstances, in the 
anxiety to introduce Manual Training and Household Science, there arises 
a tendency to think that any room, too poorly lighted and too badly ventilat- 
ed for ordinary class room purposes is "good enough." This tendency re- 
quires to be strenuously resisted and it should be taken as an 'axiom that 
Manual Training and Household Science require for their efficient practice, 
rooms just as well lighted and effectively ventilated as any other school sub- 
ject. The best time for installing these subjects is when a new building or an 
addition to an old building is being contemplated. At this time proper, and 
effective provision can be economically made. I hope to see the time speedi- 
ly arrive when no new building will be planned or erected without some pro- 
vision being made for work of a practical character with tools and materials. 
The growing industrial importance of some of our smaller towns and cities 
renders this of great moment. More than 6,000 boys and 2,000 girls are re- 
ceiving weekly instruction and where once introduced I know of not a single 
instance where these subjects have been discontinued. Over $45,000 has 
been spent on equipment and about $40,000 on special buildings and altera- 
tions to existing buildings, to adapt them for this purpose. 

Probably the greatest obstacle of all is the fact that properly trained 
and efficiently qualified teachers are not to be obtained. One of the best 
equipped schools in the Province has remained closed since June last owing 
to this scarcity, and in two others, teachers with either no qualifications at 
all or very poor ones have been unsuccessfully attempting to do the work. I 
here wish to call your attention to regulations 140, 141 and 145, which read 
as follows : — 

140. Subject to the conditions herein mentioned the Macdonald Institute, 
Guelph, shall be the only institution recognized by the Education De- 
partment for the training of teachers (for Manual Training.) 

141. The Macdonald Institute shall provide to the satisfaction of the Edu- 
cation Department suitable courses of study as well as adequate equip- 
ment and instruction for students desiring to become teachers of 
Manual Training. 

145. No grant shall be paid by the Government towards a Department of 
Manual Training unless the teacher who has charge of such Depart- 
ment is duly qualified as herein provided. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 243 



I have to report that the conditions imposed by Regulation 141 have not 
yet been carried out, but a metal work equipment is now being installed in 
temporary quarters and it is to be earnestly hoped that sufficient money will 
be appropriated to enable all the conditions and requirements to be speedily 
and satisfactorily met. While this Regulation remains unfulfilled it is dif- 
ficult if not impossible for the Education Department to fully carry out Re- 
gulations 140 and 145. 

There is still an impression abroad in some quarters that an expert 
mechanic is the best teacher for this work and one Board of Education has 
made a request to be allowed to employ such an one but it cannot be too 
strongly insisted upon that for any success in educational Manual Training the 
trained teacher must be engaged. He must be a teacher first and a teacher 
always. Of course, it is essential that he should possess a certain amount 
of mechanical skill — the more the better — but the success of a Manual Train- 
ing Instructor does not depend upon the amount of mechanical skill he pos- 
sesses but upon his teaching ability either natural or acquired. The trained 
teacher and the expert mechanic look at things from a different point of view 
and the difference between them is totally irreconcilable. The mechanic, by 
his training and his environment, is forced ever to have in mind the quantity 
of work turned out, and the quality need only be sufficiently good to sell. 
The exigencies of industrial life, and the keenness of competition have forced 
him to place the best work in sight, and to think less of the hidden parts. 
The true teacher will bestow equal care upon all parts of an object whether 
seen or unseen. "Putty," "glue and saw-dust" will have no place in his 
scheme of education. It is the producer and not the product that the teacher 
must consider, while in the workshop the product is of first importance and 
the producer comes second. A long and varied experience both at home and 
abroad has led me to the conclusion that the broader the culture, the greater 
the academic training, the greater is the success of a Manual Training in- 
structor. In view of this it becomes a matter worthy of the gravest consid- 
eration whether something should not be done with reference to the training 
of teachers for this important work, in connection with one of the Univer- 
sities, and a course established leading to a degree in Manual Training which 
should rank with the other degrees granted. This plan has been followed 
with much success in the United States. The Universities have here an op- 
portunity of showing that they have some concern with primary and second- 
ary education, and it is to be hoped that this will not be added to the list of 
"lost opportunities." Whether it be decided to train teachers for this work 
at the Macdonald Institute, the Normal Colleere, or the Universities some- 
thing should be done quickly as properly qualified teachers are required and 
cannot be obtained. 

The new curriculum adopted last Augus+ marks a distinct advance par- 
ticularly upon the lines of Art and Constructive work and follows very close- 
ly the plans now being followed in the best schools in England and tne 
United States. Steps should at once be taken to put it into active operation 
so that it shall no longer remain what it is largely at present — a curriculum 
on paper only. These subjects are new to the teachers and their previous 
training has done little to fit them to give the necessary instruction. They 
require information respecting materials, methods, and plans, and measures 
ehould be taken either through Summer Schools, Teachers' Institutes, or the 
issue of bulletins by this Department to provide them with it and bring to 
their attention examples of good work already done, without which a num- 
ber of them are entirely at sea. I have a list, partly prepared, giving in- 



244 THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



formation respecting the best books and examples for the use of teachers 
which, when complete, I shall ask the Department to issue as a bulletin' 
While m England during the past summer I devoted considerable attention 
to this question of Art instruction in the Public Schools and collected many 
examples of the work done. These were picked at random and while they 
contain many excellent drawings, yet drawings showing only average ability 
are included among them. In some cases the work of a whole class was 
given to me and m one case I brought away the work of a whole school, done 
on the day I visited it. If a selection of these could be brought to the notice 
of the teachers assembled in their institutes they might do much to stimulate 
interest and show what can be done with brush, crayon and pencil. In many 
of the English towns the work is under the direction of the local School of 
Art, I visited six typical towns and a number of rural schools and of all the 
work I saw that in the town of Leicester which has a population of about 
250,000 was by far superior to all others. The scheme adopted here is the 
result of a process of evolution which has been in progress during the past 
six years. It is marked by much artistic feeling as well as constructive prac- 
tical utility. The educational authority of this town issues as a guide to its 
teachers thirteen sets of cards (one for each standard or book) containing in 
all many hundreds of examples of work in pencil, brush, crayon, chalk, etc., 
excellently re-produced on that shade of paper which best suits the particular 
example. The examples given are not intended in any case to be used as 
copies, and the syllabus derives its great value from the wealth of suggestion 
which it contains and the intelligent manner in which its suggestions are 
adopted or adapted by the teacher to suit paricular needs and circumstances. 
The Board of Education, Whitehall, issues an illustrated syllabus to accom- 
pany their circular on primary drawing which is an excellent presentation 
of the various parts of the subject. 

Several collections of twenty or thirty of the most useful books on these 
subjects should be formed and circulated amongst the teachers through their 
institutes, for they are anxious to secure the best assistance but owing to low 
salaries are unable to purchase the books for themselves. In many of the 
large English Council (Public) Schools a separate Art room is provided, and 
to this the various classes proceed for one, two, or more periods per week. 
This room is large, well lighted and decorated with the best examples obtain- 
able so that the surroundings of the child continually exert a refined art in- 
fluence, which to some extent is reflected in the work. The decoration of 
the school room itself receives much attention and the effect is in a number of 
cases most pleasing and beneficial. Considerable attention has been paid to 
this matter in the small rural school. Art and Constructive work always 
achieves the greatest success where it is co-related with the general work of 
the school, and is not regarded as a thing apart from the general school life. 
The majority of our class rooms excel in one particular, and that is in the 
provision of sufficient blackboard accommodation for pupils' practice. While 
it is neither possible nor desirable that every school should have a properly 
equipped Manual Training room, yet it is essential that some practical work 
should be done in every school. There is not a single school in thei Province 
that could not make good use of one bench and a set of simple tools. This 
plan has been followed with success in Nova Scotia where no rural school is 
classed as of the highest grade, without it possesses and uses educationallv 
one such bench. Material abounds in the neighborhood of every rural 
s:hool, that can be effectively used for elementary Manual Training. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 245 



In accordance with recommendations made in my last report the Art ex- 
aminations which had been continued on practically the same syllabus for 
twenty-five years, were abolished and one substituted for really qualifying 
Art Specialists which the previous series though professing to do had not 
done. For the first time the examination in blackboard drawing will con- 
ist of actual drawing on the board and the ability to do this, so necessary to 
every teacher, encouraged. The new syllabus has been received with mark- 
ed approval by the most expert art and practical authorities in the Province, 
and it is now reasonably certain that every teacher capable of passing the 
new examination will be qualified to give efficient instruction in all branches 
of this subject. 

During the year the Art Schools which had previously been under the 
jurisdiction of Dr. May were placed under my charge. Their condition re- 
quires serious attention. The number of such schools has dwindled to three 
and not one of them can be said to be in a satisfactory state. They are all 
engaged in a constant struggle to provide the necessary funds to carry on 
their work efficiently, and their efforts have not met with the success the im- 
portance of the subject demands. In connection with these schools there are 
one ; or two points to consider : (1) Are the requirements of the Province suffi- 
ciently great to need three Art Schools ? (2) Would not the work be better 
done by having one centrally situated, properly equipped and efficiently staff- 
ed such school ? (3) In any case; has not the time come to place these schools 
in such a position that they will not have to depend for their existence on 
private effort and subscriptions, which only enable them to live from hand 
to mouth, and to place them under the regularly constituted educational 
authorities, putting them on a sound financial basis, generously contributed to 
by Departmental aid? (4) Should the work in any one town be duplicated 
as is the case in Toronto with one department of the Technical School and 
the Art School? These points I beg to present for your earnest considera- 
tion. 

In previous reports I have pointed out the urgent necessity that exists 
for the establishing of a system of evening classes especially in the most 
populous centres of the Province. The old Mechanics' Institutes have en- 
tirely disappeared and nothing has been done to fill the place they occupied. 
According to your reports of 1902 and 1903 these classes have been steadily 
diminishing and now outside Toronto, Hamilton and Brantford evening 
classes are practically non-existent except perhaps some few that are carried 
on by private effort. The success of such classes under the Board of Educa- 
tion, Whitehall, City and Guilds Institute of London and in many places 
in the United States shows that they have passed the experimental stage and 
the benefit they are capable of exercising upon art and industry render their 
inauguration a matter of supreme importance in the development of the trade 
of this Province. While Agriculture is and probably always will be the 
staple industry yet the different mechanical trades in wood, metal and other 
materials are of great importance and education specially designed to assist 
their intelligent practice is required. Such subjects as Mechanical Drawing, 
(which is required in every trade) Machine Construction, Architectural 
Drawing:, Mechanics, Chemistrv, Electricity, Wo^d Turning and Metal 
Work afford channels in which effort might be well directed. The success of 
the American Correspondence Colleges, which claim a large number of stu- 
dents from Ontario, shows not only that the necessity for such schools exist 
but also that given the opnortunitv, it is eagerly made use of. In his report 
of 1900 Dr. Seath recommended "that a system of evening classes for artisans 
and others be organized and put in an effective condition. For the actual 



246 THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



mechanic this provision would always be an important one." So far nothing 
has been done to carry out this recommendation. The organization of such 
classes should present no insuperable difficulty as with few additions the pre- 
sent staff and equipment of many of the High Schools and Collegiate Insti- 
tutes could be made effective for this work and the benefits its introduction 
would confer upon the artisans and mechanics of the Province can scarcely 
be overestimated. 

The only new school opened during the year is one under the control of 
the Board of Education at Ingersoll. Here an admirable room has been rent- 
ed, an excellent equipment procured, and the work commenced with much 
promise of success. A new department, that of "Science and Technology," 
has been added to the Hamilton School of Art. Manual Training classes aid- 
ed by the Department are now in active operation as follows : — Dufferin 
School, Ryerson School, Givens Street School and Wellesley School, Toronto ; 
George Street, Slater Street, Elgin Street, Bolton Street, First Avenue and 
/Cambridge Street, Ottawa; Brockville, Kingston, Brantford, Stratford, 
London, Woodstock (temporarily closed an account of inability to secure a 
teacher), Renfrew, Cobourg, Essex, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Guelph, Berlin, 
Normal Schools, Toronto, London and Ottawa, and Hamilton Normal College. 
Household Science Classes are carried on in all the Normal Schools and the 
Normal College, Brantford, Stratford, London, Renfrew, Hamilton, Inger- 
soll. Guelph, Berlin and Toronto. In connection with these schools the duty 
has been assigned to me for the past two years of estimating the grant to 
which they were entitled. These instructions were carried out but I should 
like to point out that owing to the peculiar condition of affairs no reports^ on 
these schools are sent to the Department. In all the Manual Training 
Schools with one or two exceptions the work is progressing satisfactori- 
ly. One or two tendencies should be carefully guarded against. 

1. The student should always be the first consideration, the producer and 

not the product, and while accuracy and finish should always be 
aimed at, no process should be allowed to be repeated until it be- 
comes automatic, for directly that point is reached all educational 
value is lost. 

2. Ornament should not be allowed to overshadow sound construction. Con- 

struction should come first and ornament second. It should not be 
the purpose to find a place for decoration but to decorate a place 
already existing or to us the words of Ruskin "It should not be the 
purpose to construct ornament but to ornament construction." The 
capacity to appreciate) the beauty of unadorned simple construction 
is in great need of cultivation. 

3. The individuality of both t^a^her and pupil should be allowed as much 

play as is consistent with correct methods and sound instruction. I 
have seen time after time in going through the Province exercises 
being performed, and models being constructed, which had no justi- 
fication except the fact that the teacher in his own training had 
worked the same exercises and made the .same models. In these 
cases neither the individuality of the teacher nor that of the scholar 
had been allowed to fi-row active. As far as possible the needs and 
desires of the pupil should be allowed to dictate the work he should 
do in the Manual Training room, sruided always of course by the 
superior knowledge and greater skill of the teacher. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 247 



4. The woodwork or metal work should not be regarded as of greater import- 

ance that the ''working drawing" but adequate attention should be 
paid to each. While the drawing generally proves less attractive 
than the actual construction its educational value is no less and its 
execution is necessary in order that the actual work of construction 
may be intelligently done. In place of the working drawing a free 
hand dimensioned sketch may occasionally be substituted. The 
practice of rapid free hand sketching is too much neglected and the 
boy who possesses the ability to rapidly transfer his ideas to paper 
always has clearer thoughts and is a more desirable workman than 
one who has not this power. 

5. More attention should be paid to simple lettering as the drawings are con- 

siderably improved by its use, and in the industrial world lettering 
is always employed. 

6. The decoration of the Manual Training room should also be attended to. 

There is no reason why this room should look like a barn and there 
is sufficient material connected with the work to make the room at- 
tractive) and thus exercise a beneficial and educative influence upon 
the students. 

Considerable progress has been made in the development of Manual 
Training from the more elementary woodwork to wood-turning and metal 
work. When every boy entering the Collegiate Institute has had two, or 
three years' training in woodwork it is questionable whether any continuance 
of this branch offers any educational or utilitarian advantages for him, but 
the provision of wood-turning or metal work would prove of great benefit. 
Equipments for wood-turning or metal work and in some cases for both have 
been installed in Toronto, London, Hamilton, Brantford, Stratford, King- 
ston and Berlin. The best equipment and accommodation so far provided 
is that at the last place named where an addition, admirably suited for the 
purpose, has been made to the Collegiate Institute mainly to provide for 
these subjects. The work that is being done in the Province is attracting 
considerable attention and during the year I have received requests for in- 
formation from England, Ireland, Scotland, United States, New Zealand, 
South Africa and Australia. 

In the provision of purelv technical education little has been done. 
The Agricultural College deals effectively with the needs of Agriculture. 
The School of Science and the School of Mines touch a class of students not ac- 
tively engaged in industry and tend to train engineers, foremen, and captains 
of industry rather than workmen and artisans. The requirements of these 
latter need to be met by a school of somewhat lower grade. It is doubtful 
whether there is yet room for more than one good school of this class. The mis- 
take of frittering away our energies on three or four insufficiently staffed 
and poorly eouipped schools ought not to be repeated in schools of this kind 
as has been done in the case of the Art schools already referred to. In 1900 
Dr. Seath wrote "A separate Technical School I do not believe feasible at 
present in any other place than Toronto. In its Technical School * 
we have the potentiality of a first rate institution. With a wing added for 
more teaching: class rooms, 'shops' and an assembly hall, a completed equip- 
ment and efficient staff and one or two additions to the courses we should 
have at a cost easily within the capacity of the municipality a technical 



2<8 THE REPORT OF THE !Co. 12 



school inferior to few in the United States." These words still adequately 
describe the situation and notwithstanding the re-organization of the Toronto 
school system little has been done to carry out the recommendations there 
made. The provision of "shops" and a "completed equipment" seem as far 
off to-day as when the report was made. When we see what has been and 
is being done in England, and the United States, and in less wealthy coun- 
tries on the continent of Europe such as Switzerland, still the wonder grows 
that a Province as wealthy and progressive as Ontario lags far behind in this 
provision. There is a tendency to spend more than is necessary on elaborate 
buildings and equipments beyond what is actually required. This tendency 
is most marked in some of the institutions in the United States but is a fault 
with which our severest critics cannot reproach us. The Central Higher 
Grade School, Leeds (England), and the Central Manual Training School, 
Philadelphia, are two schools which are generally free from this criticism. 
All needful equipment is pjovided but everything is for use and nothing that 
does not serve a definite purpose in the everyday life of the school is ad- 
mitted. These two schools afford good examples of the kind we need. In 
the Central Higher Grade School accommodation was originally provided for 
about 2,639 scholars but the provision of various laboratories and lecture 
threatres has considerably reduced the number of school places. At the end 
of the last school year — the twelfth in the history of the new building — the 
number of pupils on the roll was 1,749. The late Lord Play fair described it 
as "the finest and best-equipped school in this or in any country." The 
gymnasium has been fitted with a great variety of apparatus affording 
every gradation of exercise for students of both sexes and the greatest care 
is taken to prevent overstrain or accident, all the exercises being conducted 
under the personal supervision of a thoroughly qualified instructor and in 
the presence and with the assistance of the class teacher. Commodious work- 
shops have been erected and equipments both for wood and metal working 
provided so that boys intending to become engineers, electricians, general 
metal or wood workers may receive an elementary training having some con- 
nection with their future occupation. There are six teachers engaged solely 
in this division of the school. Large laboratories for elementary and ad- 
vanced work in physics, chemistry, cookery, needlework and dressmaking 
also form part of the school's equipment. The organization of every part 
seems almost perfect. On the occasion of my visit twenty-four boys were 
at work in the metal work room. They were divided as follows : eight forging, 
eight bench work, four turning and four brazing and soldering. In this way 
a small equipment was made to serve very effectively a large number of 
pupils. The excellent equipment the school possesses is also made use of for 
an effective scheme of evening classes. The school is arranged in two divi- 
sions (1) Preparatory or Elementary Section. (2) Secondary Section In ^ the 
Senior division of the elementary section the subjects are Scripture, English, 
Writing, Dictation. Arithmetic. Grammar, Composition, Geography, His- 
tory, Elementary Mathematics, Elementary Latin, French, Drawing. Gym- 
nastics, Manual' Instruction, Music, Science, Needlework, Cookery, and Do- 
mestic Science for girls. The second year's work of the elementary course is 
as follows : — 

English.— A period of English history; a period of English literature; stud} 

of an English classic. 
Latin.— Latin grammar and composition; First reader; Gradatim. 
Mathematics.— Algebra; Euclid; Plane Trigonometry. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 249 



French. Grammar ; Repetition of easy poems ; Jules Yrene, Le tour du 
monde en 80 jours; Labiche et Martin, La Poudre aux yeuz. 

German. — Grammar, easy translation. 

Science. — Practical Plane and Solid Geometry; Inorganic Chemistry (Theo- 
retical and Practical); Physics (Theoretical and Practical). 

Drawing.— Freehand; Linear Perspective; Model; Elementary Shading. 
Commerical. — Business Methods; Shorthand; Geography (Europe and India). 
Manual Instruction. — Woodwork and Metal work. 
Gymnastics. 

The secondary section is intended to occupy four years and is divided 
into Elementary and Advanced, each taking two years. The fourth year of 
the Advanced Course is as follows : — 

English.— History of the English Language; Modern Literature and History. 

Latin.— Latin Grammar and Composition; Virgil, JEneid, Bk, 1; Csesar, 
De Bello Gallico, Bk. V. ; Extracts from Ovid and Livy. 

French.— Grammar and Composition; Conversation; Alfred de Musset, On ne 
saurait penser a tent; Michelet, Recit d'histoire de France; Lazare, 
Half hours with modern French Authors; Kron's French Daily Life. 

Mathematics.— Algebra, Euclid, Trigonometry; Co-ordinate Geometry. 

GWm^m.— Grammar; Conversation; Ferdinand Goebel, Riiebezahl. 

Science.— Practical Plane and Solid Geometry; Heat (Theoretical and Ex- 
perimental); General Physics; Organic and Inorganic Chemistry 
(Theoretical and Practical). 

Commercial and General Geography. 

Art. — Mechanical Drawing; Drawing and shading from objects and casts. 

Manual Instruction — Woodwork and Metal Work. 

GynhJiastics. 

The Central Manual Training School, Philadelphia, is of much the 
same character. Manual Training as given in many of the schools in the 
United States goes beyond what is understood elsewhere as Manual Training, 
and becomes^ very largely technical. The purpose of this school is stated 
to be "to bring thought and labour together to make the thinker a worker 
and the worker a thinker," and judging from what I saw and the eighteen 
years' work of the school this purpose seems to have been carried out. Be- 
sides the Principal, the staff of the school consists of 26 teachers. It is divid- 
ed into five departments : literature, mathematics, science, drawing and 



250 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



manual training and equal attention is given to both, the academic and prac- 
tical sides. The equipment of the Manual Training Departments is as fol- 
lows : — 

Wood Work (First Year). 

Fifty cabinet maker's benches with sets of tools for each, bench; two 
grindstones; two glue pots. 

Wood Work (Second Year). 

Twenty-four cabinet maker's benches, each, with its full set of tools; 
twenty-four wood lathes; one grindstone, one glue pot. 

Metal Work (First Year). 

Twenty-five vises with, set of tools for each, vise ; one grindstone ; one sur- 
face plate; six troughs for moulding; furnaces, trowels, sieves, flasks, etc., 
for foundry work, soldering irons, heaters, stakes, etc., for tinsmithing. 

Metal Work (Second Year). 

Twenty-four forges, twenty-four anvils, each supplied with a set of 
tools; two light drill presses; one grindstone. 

Mechanical Construction (Third Year). 

Eight engine lathes; two hand lathes; one planer; one shaper; one 
drill press ; six vises ; one brazing apparatus ; one emery grinding machine • 
three large surface plates ; one screw press (the last three made by the stu- 
dents). Power is furnished by a sixty horse-power Corliss engine, with a 
seventy horse-power boiler; one Thompson-Houston dynamo thirteen kilo- 
watts, and one multipolar dynamo, seventeen kilowatts. The examination 
for admission to this school is open to pupils who have gone through all the 
grades of the Public Schools. 

A very gratifying feature of the year's work has been the development 
of the Manual Arts in the various Normal Schools and the Normal College. 
The equipment is, generally speaking, adequate though one or two additions 
might well be made. The courses include wood work, paper and cardboard 
work, basketry, metal work, modelling and glass work and at the end of the 
year's training each student may reasonably be expected to have such a 
practical knowledge of various materials and their general application to 
educational purposes, as will materially add to his or her efficiency as a 
teacher. The limited time during which the students attend the model 
school prevents, at present, the inclusion of training in the manual arts. 
When this instruction is given here all our institutions having to do with 
the training of teachers will be taking part in this work. 

Steps were taken at the last meeting of the Ontario Educational Asso- 
ciation to form a section to be devoted to these subjects, and the programme 
organized for the next conference promises to be a very interesting one. 



1904 Education department. 251 



Previous to the issue in August last of the revised regulations, grants 
were not paid on equipments which had been presented to the various School 
Boards. This restriction has now been removed and in future grants will be 
paid on thirteen such equipments. 

The attention of Educational authorities requires to be drawn to Regu- 
lation 150 particularly sections 5 and 6. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your obedient servant, 

ALBERT H. LEAKE. 

Toronto, 8th February, 1905. 



252 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX L.— Statistics of 



Name of Model School. 


Name of Principal . 


a, 
'8 

Ph 

o 

CD 

o 

o 


a 
'8 

'S 

Ph 

O 

>> 

n 

w 


ID 
JSl 

"s 

'o 

1 


1 

CO 

a 
o 

g.3 

> be 

•ri >} 

W^H 

II 

5 


CO 

z u 


i. 

8 

r) 


1 Athens 


C. R. Macintosh 

W.J. Hallet 


II 


% 

800 
900 
600 

1.150 

a280 
750 
850 
675 

1.200 
900 

1,000 

750 

• 700 

800 

1000 
800 

1.025 

1.000 
800 
800 

1.200 

1.200 
850 
850 
780 
500 
800 
600 
900 

1.000 
750 
600 
800 

1,100 
900 

1.000 
800 

1,050 

1.100 
800 

950 

1,000 

700 

1.200 

1,000 

1.000 

800 

1200 

850 

1,550 

1,100 

700 

850 

600 

950 

i inn 


! 

1901 All 
1893 
1903 
1877 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1902 
1900 
1884 
1902 
1888 
1903 
1894 
1888 
1902 
1902 
1885 
1903 
1902 
1888 
1900 
1897 
1899 
1893 
1904 
1899 
1904 

1900 5 h 
1899 All 
1903 
1902 
1885 
1894 
1896 
1884 
1901 
1903 
1903 

1902 All 

h 

1903 All 
191)3 
1904 
1899 
1904 
1877 
1889 
1887 
1882 
1895 
1889 
1904 
1902 
1903 
1877 
1901 
1893 








2 Barrie 




1 




3 Beamsville 


WJM. Mitchell 

J. Suddabv 


4 


4 Berlin 




1 
1 


8 


5 Brarebridge 

6 Bradford 


Wm . Rannie 

A. N. Scarrow 

Jas. A. Underhill 


6 


7 .Brampton 


P 


8 Caledonia 


John B. Widdis 








9 Chatham 


J. W. Plewes , 






17 


10 Clinton 


W R. Lough 








11 Cornwall 


S.J. Kevs. B.A 

Thos. Allan 






1" 


12 Durham 




2 B.A.'s 
1 




13 Elora 


David T. Wright 

James Campbell 


4 


14 Forest 




15 Gananoque 


J. C. Linklater 




1 
o 

5 




16 Goderich 


Jas. H. Tigert 

John B. Robinson. B.A 

H, F. McDiarmid 




17 Hamilton 


3 


18 Ingersoll 


10 


19 Kincardine 


W . B . Beer 

R. F. Greenlees 

G. E. Broderick 

Geo. B. Kirk 

T. C. Tice 




20 Kingston 

21 Lindsay 

22 London 




4 
2 
1 


46 

18 

9 


23 Madoc 


(> 


24 Meaford 


M. N. Clark, B.A 

W . F . Inman 


. 




25 Milton 




1 


4 


26 Minden 


Wm . Thos. Arthurs 




27 Mitchell 


J. H. W. McRoberts 

Clarence D . Bouck 

G.R.Theobald 

C . H . Edwards, B.A 

J. F. Harvev, B.A 

R. H. Leighton 


ours . . . 


1 




28 Morrisburg 

29 Mount Forest. . 


-1 

S 


30 Napanee 


day 


1 (B.A.) 
2 


6 


31 Newmarket 

32 Norwood 


4 
4 


33 Orangeville 


M.N. A rmstrong 

T. A. Reid .. • 






9 


34 Owen Sound 






9 


35 Parry Sound 




2 


4 


36 Perth 


M . M . Jaques 

S. C. Woodworth 

W. A. Stickle 

A . A . Jordan 

R. F. Downey 

H . W. Kerfoot, B.A 

J. W. Forhan 

John Flower 


8 


37 Picton 


except y 2 
Dur 


1 
1 

""i" 




38 Port Arthur 


10 


39 Port Hope 


14 


40 Port Perry 

41 Prescott 


4 


42 Rat Portage 

43 Renfrew 




2 


8 
9 


44 St. Thomas 


6S. Silcox, B.A., D. Paed 

John M. Kaine 

A. Wark 






11 


45 Sault Ste. Marie 






in 


46 Sarnia 






8 


47 Simcoe 


I. S. Rowat 


] :::::::: 


2 
2 


s 


48 Stratford 


bj. Russell Stuart 

Thos Dunsmore 

W. E. Groves 


23 


49 Strathrov 


8 


50 Toronto 


........ 


1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


fl 


51 Toronto Junction 


Wm. Wilson 


10 


52 Vankleekhill 


Samual A. Hitsman 

W . R. Manning 

David Hicks, B.A 




53 Walkerton 

54 Welland 


7 
3 


55 Whitby 

56 Windsor 


J. A. Brown 

David M . Eagle 

S . Nethercott 


3 

12 


57 Woodstock 


i i!6oo 


23 














Totals 


8 University graduates 


56 I 
1 II 


c9Q4 






50 


469 











a For the term. 



& Inspector of Public Schools. 



c Average annual salary. 



1904 



'EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



253 



County Model Schools, 1904. 







from 




aJ 








GO 


1 


1 




V 

c 

■- -J 

"O 13 


03 

.5 

13 

•a '£ 










£ 








P 

c 




CO 






2 



•H 


|| 






c 




« 








CO 





a 


S 


'" S 


2 3 








e- 

0» 


.2 

'co 








c 


c 



<3 





a; 


2 
oa - 


03 g 
5.8 






rd-O 


T3 


a> 

















a 5 


g.2 






:°^ 













rfl 












& 


1 CO 

l l 


s ° 


p 
ft 

a 



ft 

CO 

03 


3 
Si 


5 




O 


13 

CO 


co 

CO 


53 

co 

co 


g 03 
CO' !J3 

g 


|03 

2 


'd 


5 


t-( 




£ 


So 




c 


_C 






|S 


5" 






:so2 














T3 . 








No. with 


d 




ft 

<D 
CO 

CO 





a 

03 

O 

O 


ft 

'5 


CO 




6 


SI 

53 

ft 





. CD 


S8 

jr be 

SI 

1-^ 


«M 13 












$ 


% 


% 














1 




.111 day 


Yes 


140 
146 


150 
150 
150 
300 
300 


150 
150 

150 
300 


155 
215 

80 
110 

70 
160 


4 
8 
4 
9 
12 
4 


4 
8 
4 
9 

8 
4 


7 or 8 
5 or 6 
5 or 6 
7 or 8 
2 
4 


7 or 8 
5 or 6 
5 or 6 


4 weeks 




•> 




(. weeks 


3 




All day 


a 


164 


6 " 


(i •• 


l 




a 


150 
150 


6 " 


6 " 


5 2 






.< 


7 or 8 
2 
4 


6 " 


6 " 


6 1 




All day 


" 


131 


150 


150 


6 


7 " 






'■ 


" 


138 


150 


250 


65 


9 


7 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


6 " 




8 




7 






" 


140 


150 


150 


85 


4 


4 


4 or 5 


4 or 5 


7 " 








7 " 










403 


150 

150 


150 
150 


160 
175 


18 

7 


18 

7 


3 or 4 
5 


3 or 4 

5 






1U 1 







" 


146 


4 " 


6 " 
6 '• 


11 








250 
110 


150 

150 


150 
150 


175 
150 


12 . 

8 


12 
5 


3 
3 


3 
3 




12 


1 


'< 


" 


4 " 
4 " 


6 '• 

8 •' 


13 






" 


147 


150 


150 


110 


5 


5 


4 or 5 


4 or 5 


6 " 


14 




6 " 








120 
155 


150 

150 


150 
150 


80 
20 


6 
12 


6 
6 


3 

2 








15 3 

16 1 

17 1 

18 







" 


3 

2 


6 " 
6 " 


6 " 




" 


' 


138 


150 


150 


145 


11 


10 


4 


4 


7 " 


5^" 


i 





" 


264 


150 


150 


115 


10 


9 


lor 2 


1 or 2 








146 
144 


150 

150 


200 
150 


45 
105 


13 

7 


10 

7 


3 
3 


3 
3 






19 







" 


5 

6 " 


6 " 

6 •• 


21 




All' day '.'.'.':'.'. 


<< 


202 
250 


150 
150 


150 
150 


80 

75 


50 
20 


45 

14 


2 or 3 

1 


2 or 3 
1 


6 " 
5 " 


6 " 

7 " 
6 " 


22 

23 




,, 


" 


116 
250 


150 
150 


69 
250 


140 
115 


10 
6 


10 


3 
3 or 4 


3 


4 " 


24 2 










3 or 4 


5 '■ 


5 


i 





" 


139 


150 


150 


70 


9 


7 


4 


4 


6 " 


6 " 
6 " 
9 " 

6 " 


20 2 
26 







« 


139 
205 


150 
150 


200 
150 


65 
42 


7 
2 


5 
2 


3 or 4 

4 


3 or 4 

4 

2 or 3 


6 " 
8 " 
6 " 


27 

28 1 




All day 


" 


146 


150 


150 


45 


7 


7 


2 or 3 







" 


148 


150 


150 


115 


7 


7 


4 


4 


6 


6 


29 




5 hours 


" 


150 


150 


150 


95 


8 


8 


2 or 3 


2 or 3 


5 " 


30 1 




5 " 


2 






200 


150 
150 


150 
175 


140 
105 


10 

7 


9 

7 


3 or 4 
3 


3 or 4 
3 


5 " 

7 " 




3L 




All day 


" 


161 


5 

8 " 


32 

33 1 

34 2 







" 


125 


150 


150 


100 


5 


5 


4 


4 


5 " 


7 







" 


144 


150 


150 


45 


10 




3 


3 


7 " 










289 


150 
300 
150 


150 


115 

75 
25 


12 
13 
10 


11 
5 
10 


3 
3 

4 


3 






3o 5 




All day 


11 


143 

160 


6 " 


8 " 


36 2 

37 2 

38 






" 


150 


3 
4 


6 

7 " 


6 '• 







,, 


200 


150 


150 


60 


10 
12 
15 


8 
12 
13 


2 

1 

2 or 3 


2 

1 
2 or 3 


6 " 

5 " 

6 " 


7 


39 1 

40 1 




" 


" 


175 


150 


300 


145 


6 

6 " 








148 


150 


150 


120 


6 


6 


4 


4 


6 " 


6 '■ 


41 

42 1 







" 


181 


150 


150 


95 


7 


7 


2 or 3 


2 or 3 


6 " 


6 '• 








60 


300 






12 


10 


3 




6 " 


t; ■• 


41 






11 


137 

161 


150 
150 


it>6 

150 


140 
195 


8 
11 


8 
11 


3 or 4 
5 
2 
3 

2 or 3 


3 or 4 

5 

2 

3 
2 or 3 1 


5 '• 

6 " ' 
6 " 
6 " 
6 " 


6 " 
6 •• 
6 '• 
6 " 


45. 

46 




All day 


" 


60 
141 


300 
150 


I56' 


50 
110 


10 
9 


10 

8 

7 


47 

48 1 




All day 


" 


193 


150 


150 


75 


7 








400 


150 
150 
150 


150 
150 
150 


120 

65 

105 


26 
9 


21 
9 


3 
1 or 2 


3 
1 or 2 






49 

50 ! 




All day 


" 


152 
261 


(i " 


6 

6 • ' 


g i 








12 


11 


21 


2 


2 


• 6 







" 


125 


150 


150 


60 


11 


11 


3 


3 


6 " 


6 


53 




,, 




186 

147 | 


150 
150 


150 
150 I 


125 
120 


4 
9 


4 


6 or 7 


6 or 7 


3 " 


7 


54 1 








9 


3 


3 


2 




"3" 


;« '...::: 


" 


75 j 
174 
143 


150 
150 
150 


150 

150 | 
150 1 


65 

50 

140 


5 
7 
14 


5 

7 


3 
4 


3 

4 




4 


56 


6 " 


7 


57 2 








14 


2 or 3 


2 or 3 


5 " 


6 


1 






274 


150 


150 


100 


30 


20 


2 


2 


6 " 


8 ■• 


M | 


•| 






9,542 


9,150 


8,344 


5,607 








■1 




















254 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 







APPENDIX 


L. — Statistics of County 








u 




% g 








V 




d 






p 




c 




oq 

3 


.Q 


is 




J2 




'~ 




§ 


"j5 


73 be 




3 








o 


bo 










£ 




s 


5 


*,§ 


in 


> 














O 






r. 




T3 




en £ 


i 


x 




03 

d 


c3 
d 


15 SR 

*2 M 


o ° 

$21 


8© 

88 d 


A 


c 


Name of Model School . 


d 


S-l 

o 


.5 £■ 


S3 


o % 




M 




M 


X 




5r! fej ° 


u jS 


o 






CD 
0) 


3 

d 


8g~ 

— c 




CD +* 

a * 


bJO 


2% 




y_ " 






3d 


£ i-. 




oS 




oc ' 


o 


OcC 




a^2 


-^i 


^Tr 




U O 




s-l - 


CD fl 










aegs 
















,Q.g 


,o 


rCC 




^b£ 


aS 


r '7. 




p.5 
s-d 


a 


d o 


£5 


CD cS 


> 


§£ 




£ 


^ 


Sq 


^ 


<J 


<j 


H 




7 


i to \y A 
X A to % 


11 


20 


56 






2 Barrie 


8 


20 


15 


32 


15 " 




3 Bearasville 


7 


l to 134 


11 


16 


23 


20 " 


1 *' 


4 Berlin 


6 


i% 


14 


15 


23 


20 " 


1 " 


5 Bracebridge 


5 


] 


8 


20 


35 


20 " 


1 


6 Bradford .-." 


6 


l% 


10 


16 


51 


20 " 


4 days. 


7 Brampton 


6 


1 to 1% 


15 


20 


20 


20 " 


4 " 


8 Caledonia 


6 


1% to 2 


7 


21 


51 


25 " 




9 Chatham 


6 
5 
5 


8 


24 
16 
24 


22 
20 

21 


30 
22 
30 


20 " 
18 " 
15 " 




10 Clinton 




11 Cornwall 


2 dars. * 


12 Durham 


4 

7 


1 

i to \y 2 


12 

12 


20 
20 


15 
37 


20 " 
20 " 


2 


13 Elora 


3 


11 Forest . 


6 


tf 


16 


18 


18 


20 " 




15 Gananoque 


3davsin 


14 


24 


7 


20 " 


1 " 




e'choff. 














16 Goderich 


5 

7 


i 


25 

140 


21 
21 


24 
3 


20 " 
25 " 




17 Hamilton 


1 week. 


18 Ingersoll 


5 


$ 


14 


16 


10 


22 " 


1 " 


19 Kincardine 


6 


23 


22 


20 


20 " 


1 " 


20 Kingston 


7 


i 


45 


23 


8 


20 " 


4 days. 


21 Lindsav 


5 


iM 


36 


20 


8 


22% " 


2 " 




6 

7 


i 
1M 


10 
15 


20 
20 


56 
30 


20 " 
15 " 


•) " 


23 Madoc 


1 week. 


24 Meafoid 


6 


i£ 


11 


18 


23 


20 " 


2 days. 


25 Milton 


6 


l 


18 


20 


14 


20 " 


1 week. 


26 Minden 


4 


l 


10 


17 


12 


20 " 


1 " 


27 Mitchell 


7 


iK 


10 


24 


22 


20 " 


4 days. 


28 Morrisburg 


6 


^ 


18 


20 


31 


25 " 


1 week. 


29 Mount Forest 


6 
6 


£ 


17 
14 


22 
25 


26 

56 


20 '• 
25 " 




30 Napanee 


1 week. 


31 Newmarket 


a 


iS 


19 


24 


26 


25 " 


1 


32 Norwood 


3 


i 


11 


14 


25 


20 " 


2 days. 


33 Orangeville 


7 


i 


14 


21 


13 


20 " 


1 week, 


34 Owen Sound 


4 


iK 


14 


20 


33 


20 " 


2 days . 


35 Parry Sound 


6 


1 except Monday 


8 


23 


43 


20 " 


1 week. 


36 Perth 


7 


1% 


20 


21 


32 


20 " 


1 " 


37 Picton 


3 


1* to 2% 

1% (3 days per 


11 


20 


22 


20 " 


3 days. 


38 Port Arthur 


6 
6 


22 
20 


30 

18 


26 


20 " 
20 " 






1 


40 Port Perrv 


6 

7 


12 
14 


24 
20 


48 
27 


25 " 
20 " 


1 " 


41 Prescott 


1 " 






week) 












42 Rat Portage 


6 


IS 

i 

134 
1M 


20 


29 


6 


20 " 


1 




8 
6 


17 
12 


16 
20 


26 
65 


20 " 

20 " 


2 days. 
4 " 


44 St. Thomas 


45 Sault Ste. Marie ; 


6 


8 


19 


24 


20 " 


4 " 




8 
4 
6 
6 


24 
]2 
58 

27 


24 
20 
25 
27 


22 
25 
10 
12 


17 " 
20 " 
20 " 
20 " 


4 




3 


48 Stratford 




49 Strathrov 


3 to 4 da\s 




5 


% to 1 
l 


13 


20 


32 


25 " 


1 day. 


51 Toronto Junction 


6 


14 . 


18 


15 


20 " 


3 days. 




D 


2% (4 days per 
week) 


li 


20 


45 


15 " 


1 week. 


53 Walkerton 


7 


a2% 


15 


16 


26 


20 " 


3 days. 


54 Wetland.. . 


s 


Vi 


5 


17 


44 


30 " 






6 


] K 


17 


29 


17 


20 " 


4 davs. 


56 Windsor 


7 


1 


19 


20 


29 


20 " 


1 week. 


57 Woodstock 


5 


i to \}4 


20 


20 


20 


40 " 


4 days. 


Totals 






























Observing and teaching. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



255 



Model Schools, 1904.— Concluded. 



56 



31 
26 
16 
22 
14 
32 
15 
17 
32 
35 
35 

9 
22 
16 

4 

29 
23 

9 
21 
16 
15 
28 
23 
14 
13 

7 

9 
28 
20 
28 
21 
20 

9 
23 
15 
31 
12 

5 
29 
24 
19 

4 
28 
39 
10 
22 
15 
22 
12 
21 
12 
25 

24 
13 
10 



Number who passed the 
final examination. 



9 
3 

18 
18 

6 
17 
13 

9 
24 
16 

8 
10 

5 

7 
15 
13 
20 
15 
13 

6 
16 
15 
22 

9 

4 
18 
19 
11 

4 
26 
32 
10 

18 
8 

19 
7 

20 
9 

14 

8 
12 

8 
26 

18 



18 
18 

6 
17 
13 

9 
23 
!6 

8 
10 

5 

7 
14 
13 
19 
11 
13 

6 
16 
11 
21 

9 

4 
18 
19 
11 

4 
26 
32 

9 
17 

6 
19 



31 
25 
16 

22 
13 
32 
15 
17 
32 
35 
34 

9 
21 
16 

4 

29 
23 

9 
21 

16 
14 
26 
23 
14 
13 

7 

9 
27 
20 
27 
20 
19 

9 
23 
14 
30 
12 

5 
29 
23 
17 

4 
28 



2S7 



1,097 



91 



827 



204 



135 



150 
280 



135 
125 
125 
200 
120 
150 
175 
110 
140 
175 

150 



150 



250 
150 
175 
150 



150 
150 
125 



150 
130 
125 



2U0 
150 
140 
220 



180 
200 



125 
160' 

ieo' 

175" 



175 

150 
150 
130 
180 



18.22 years 

19.5 

19.4 

19 

18.66 " 

18.75 •' 

19 

IS. 66 " 

19 

18.9 

19 

18.5 

18 

18.5 

18 

18.5 

18.7 

19 

19 

19.6 

19.4 

19 

18.5 

18.4 

19 

18 

19.25 " 

20 

19 

J9.fi 

18.5 

19 

19 

18.75 •• 
18 

19 

18.5 

18 

18 

19. S 

19 

18.5 "'• 

18 

18.3 

19 

19 

19 

18.5 

18.5 

18. 76 
is 

19 

18.46 " 

19 

19 

18.92 •• 

18.9 



374 



256 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



APPENDIX M —PROVINCIAL NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS, ONTARIO 

NORMAL COLLEGE. 

I. PROVINCIAL NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS, TORONTO. 

1. Staff of Toronto Normal School. 

Wm. Scott, B.A. Principal. 

■\y. w Elliott, B.A Vice-Principal. 

A. C. Casselman Drawing 5 .-see/. 

A. T. Cringan Music Master. 

Jps. H. Wilkinson Instructor in Manual Training. 

Miss Nina A. Ewing -.Instructor in Household Economics. 

Miss Mary E. Macintyre Instructor in Kindergarten Principles. 

Wm. Oldright, M.D Instructor in Hygiene. 

Mrs. Jean Somers Instructor in Calisthenics. 

Mrs. Emma Macbeth Instructor in Needle Work. 

Sergeant-Major D. Borland Instructor in Drill. 



Students Admitted, Session 1904-5. 



Male ... 
Female 



3 
139 



Total 142 

2. Staff of the Provincial Model School, Toronto. 

Angus Mcintosh Head Master. 

Miss M. Meehan First Female Assistant. 

R. W. Murray r-— +. Male Assistant. 

iv Caulfeild Assistant. 

Miss A. F. Laven Assistant. 

Tliomas M. Porter 'distant. 

Milton A. Sorsoleil /distant. 

Miss F. M. Taylor ■ Assistant. 

Miss A. E. G. Wilson Assistant. 

Miss Hope Merritt Assistant. 

A. C. Casselman Drawing Master. 

A. T. Cringan Music Master 

Miss Mary E. Macintyre Kindergarten Directress. 

Miss Ellen Cody Kindergarten Assistant. 

Mrs. Jean Somers Instructor in Calisthenics. 

Mrs. Emma Macbeth Instrucor in Needle Work. 

Sergeant-Major D. Borland Drill Master. 

Eugene Masson French Master 

Tas H Wilkinson Instructor in Manual lrainmg. 

Miss Nina A. Ewing Instructor in Household Economics. 

Number of pupils in 1904 525 

Number of Kindergarten pupils in 1904 ol 



II. PROVINCIAL NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS, OTTAWA 
1. Staff of Ottawa Normal School. 

James F. White Principal. 

S. B. Sinclair, M.A., Ph. D ^ice Principal 

J A. Dobbie Drawing and Writing Master. 

T A Brown " T usic Master. p - 

MissE. H. Keyes, B.E instructor in Elocution and Physical Cul- 
ture. 

Miss Eliza Bolton T, ectlir er on Kindergarten Principles. 

Miss B. Livingstone Lecturer on Domestic Science. 

j g Harterre « Instructor in Manual Training. 

Students Admitted, Session 1904-5. 

Male J* 

Female bb 

Total 75 



1904 ' EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 257 



2. Staff of Provincial Model School, Ottawa. 

J. H. Putlnan, B.A Head Master. 

J. F. Sullivan First Assistant. 

F. A. Jones Second Assistant. 

Miss Jennie Hilliard Third Assistant. 

Miss M. E. Butterworth First Female Assistant. 

Miss Evelyn Weir Second Female Assistant. 

Miss A. G. Hanahde Third Female Assistant. 

Miss J. Foster Fourth Female Assistant. 

Miss Eliza Bolton Kindergarten Directress. 

Miss A. Baker Kindergarten Assistant. 

J. A. Dobbie Drawing and Writing Master. 

T. A. Brown Music Master. 

Miss E. H. Keyes B.E Teacher of Physical Culture. 

Miss B. Livingstone Teacher of Domestic Science. 

J. Fleury French Teacher. 

J. S. Harterre Manual Training Instructor. 

Number of pupils, 1904 334 

Number of Kindergarten pupils, 1904 62 



III. PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, LONDON. 

Staff of London Normal School. 

F. W. Merchant, M.A., D.Psed Principal. 

John Dearness, M. A Vice-Principal. 

S. K. Davidson Drawing Master. 

Fred. L. Evans Music Master. 

Miss Agnes Mackenzie Teacher of Kindergarten Principles. 

Sugden Pickles Manual Training Instructor. 

Students Admitted, Session 1904-5. 

Male 10 

Female 77 

Total : 87 



IV. ONTARIO NORMAL COLLEGE. 
Officers : 

J. A. McLellan, M.A., LL.D., Principal. 
R. A. Thompson, B.A., Vice-Principal. 
Faculty : 

J. A. McLellan, M.A., LL.D Professor of Education. 

R. A. Thompson, B.A Lecturer on School Management. 

J. B. Turner, B.A Lecturer on Methods in Chemistry, Botany 

and Zoology. 

J. T. Crawford, B.A. ., Lecturer on Methods in Mathematics. 

W. M. Logan, M.A Lecturer on Methods in Classics. 

E. S. Hogarth, B.A Lecturer on Methods in Modern Languages. 

F. F. Macpherson, B.A Lecturer on Methods in Literature and 

Composition. 

S. A. Morgan, B.A., D.Psed Lecturer on Methods in English Grammar 

and Rhetoric. 

A. Patterson, M.A Lecturer on Methods in History and Geo- 
graphy. 

J. Gill, B.A., B.Psed Lecturer on Methods in Physics. 

Agnes Knox-Black Lecturer on Reading and Elocution. 

J. C. McCabe, M.D Lecturer on School Hygiene and Sanitation. 

G. L. Johnston, B.A. ... Lecturer on Writing and Drawing. 

M. C. Macpherson, B.A Domestic Science Instructor. 

W. Bailey Manuel Training Instructor. 

J . Johnson Music. 

T. E. Parkhill, Sergt. Drill, Gymnastics and Calisthenics. 

Students Admitted, Session 1904-5. 

Male 45 

Female 121 

Total 166 

2 e (ii) 



258 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX N.—H1GH SCHOOL CADET CORPS, 1904. 





Number of 






Name of 


Officers, 
N. C . Officers 


Drill. 


Remarks of Militia Officers on the efficiency 


School. 


and boys 
in the Corps. 




of the corps. 


Arthur 


48 


Fair 


Satisfactory . 
Satisfactory . 


Barrie 


63 


Good 


Brantford 


33 


Very good . . . 


Satisfactory . 


Chatham 


43 


Very good . . . 


Satisfactory . 


Cobourg ...... 


41 


Very good . . . 


Satisfactory . 


Collingwood . . 


41 


Fair 


Satisfactory . 
Satisfactory . 
Satisfactory . 


Dundas 


28 


Fair 


Dunnville 


23 


Good 


Gait 


35 


Very good . . . 
Excellent .... 


Satisfactory . 
Very satisfactory . 


Guelph 


57 


Hamilton 


37 


Very good . . . 


Satisfactory. 


Lindsay 


42 


Good 


Satisfactory. 


Markham 


39 


Good 


Satisfactory. 


Morrisburg .... 


42 


Good 


Found this company superior to expectations, 
and strongly recommend that every encour- 
agement possible be given them . 


Mount Forest . . 


40 


Very good . . . 


Satisfactory . 


Napanee 


42 


Very good . . . 


Satisfactory . 


Newmarket. . . 


26 


Fair 


Fair only . 


Niagara Falls . . 
Norwood 


24 


Fair 


Satisfactory . 
Satisfactory . 


27 


Good 


Orillia 


42 


Fair 


Satisfactory . 

This is an excellent company, clothed in khaki 


Ottawa 


38 


Very good . . . 








uniform. They are very smart and well 








drilled and their instructor, Lieut. B. 9. Simp- 








son, has taken great pains with their training 








and deserves much credit for their present 








creditable condition . 


Owen Sound . . . 


45 


Very good . . . 


Very satisfactory. 


Peterborough . . 


38 


Excellent .... 


Very satisfactory. 


Port Perry 


31 


Good 


Satisfactory. 
Very satisfactory. 


St. Catharines. . 


43 


Very good . . . 


St. Thomas .... 


55 


Excellent .... 


The corps is undoubtedly the best drilled and 
disciplined in the District, and reflects great 
credit on the instructor and, the boys them- 
selves . 


Sarnia 


50 


Good 


This corps. . . .made an excellent showing. By 
next year I am quite sure it will be one of the 
best in the District. Their shooting for the 
11 Beck Shield " compared most favorably. 


Seaforth 


34 


Good 


Satisfactory. 


Strathroy 


40 


Very good . . . 


Not satisfactory owing to the absence of officers. 


Toronto — 








Harbord 


39 


Very good . . . 


Very satisfactory . 


Jameson 


28 


Very good . . . 


Very satisfactory . 


Jarvis 


49 


Very good . . . 


Very satisfactory . 


Uxbridge 


31 


Good 


Satisfactory . 


Vankleekhill . . 


39 


Good 


Satisfactory . 


Woodstock 


59 


Very good . . . 


Very satisfactory. 


Total 


1,392 
35 corps. 







1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



259 



APPENDIX 0.— SUPERANNUATED TEACHERS. 

{Continued from Report of 1903.) 
*1. Allowances Granted During 1904. 



■gjs 

*SoS 
« 5 


Name . 


Age. 


Post Office. 


Years of 
service . 


Allow- 
ance. 


1123 


Moore, Thomas T 

Davis, James Alfred 

Bell, Wm 


64 
60 
61 
56 
53 
61 
53 
53 
60 
67 
52 
57 
65 
63 
60 


Acton 


41| 

24 

36i 

34 

33 

40 

18 

31$ 

40£ 

41 

34 

23 

31 

40^ 

41 


$ c. 
284 00 


1124 
1125 


Mount Albion 

Ailsa Craig 

Doncaster 


166 00 
255 50 


1126 


Latter, Joseph 

Hanson, Mary E. F 


238 00 


1127 


London 

Berlin 


231 00 


1128 


Connor, James Wm 

Bell, David . 


280 00 


1129 


Rockton 


126 00 


1130 


Rabb, John 


Lombardy 


109 75 


1131 


Wilkins, Miss Eliz. A 

Dafoe, John W 

Morgan, James W 

Weatherston, Miss Mary. . . . 
Goodbody, Y, m 


St. Catharines 


243 00 


1132 


Belleville 


281 00 


1133 


Port Arthur 


238 00 


1134 
1135 


Toronto 

Gananoque 


161 00 
186 00 


1136 


fWadsworth, James J 

tMackenzie, Wm. F 


Simcoe 


283 50 


1137 


Marden 


280 00 











2. Summary for Years 1882-1904. 



Year . 


Number of 
teachers 
on list. 


Expenditure 
for the year. 


Gross 
contributions 
to the fund. 


Amount 

refunded to 

teachers. 


1882 


422 
454 
456 
424 
407 
398 
392 


$ c. 
51.000 00 
58,295 33 
63,750 00 
62,800 33 
64,244 92 
63,267 43 
64,259 75 


$ c. 

13,501 08 

1,489 00 

1,313 50 

847 00 
1,073 50 

996 00 

934 75 


$ c. 
3,660 10 


1887 . 


3,815 80 


1892 


786 86 


1897 


620 27 


1902 


722 78 


1903 

1904 


470 25 

987 48 







Ten teachers' subscriptions were withdrawn from the fund during 1904. 
*As the sum of $4 is deducted from each Superannuated Teacher's allowance, as subscrip- 
tion to the fund, the payments were $4 less in each case than given in this list, 
t Allowance commences with 1905. 



260 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX P.— ANNUAL .REPORT OF SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL 

SCIENCE. 

To the Hon. R. A. Pyne, M.D., M.P.P., 

Minister of Education. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual report of the School of 
Practical Science for the year 1904. 

The calendar year not being conterminous with the academic year, this 
report will cover the second term of the academic year, 1903-04, and the 
first term of the academic year, 1904-05, except when otherwise stated. 

The number of students in attendance was as follows : 



In the Regular Departments. 



I. year. . 
II. year. . 

III. year. . 

IV. year. . 
Occasional 




1st Term. 
Session 1904-05. 



208 

144 

76 

47 

5 



480 



The fees for the academic year 1903-04 were $28,522. 

Of the above amount, $2,053 were paid to the .Bursar of the Univer- 
sity of Toronto for instruction in Mathematics and Biology, under the 
authority of an Order-in-Council, dated February 3rd, 1904; $1,431.40 to 
the Examiners of the School for the Session 1903-04, under the authority 
of an Order-inCouncil, dated February 3rd, 1899, and the remainder, 
$25,037.60, to the Honourable the Provincial Treasurer."" 

The number of regular students who presented themselves for examina- 
tion at the annual examinations of the academic year 1903-04 was three 
hundred and fifty-five. Of these two hundred and sixty-four passed. 

The number of candidates who graduated was seventy. The total num- 
ber of graduates to date is four hundred and seventy. 

The following statement shows the geographical distribution of the 
graduates now living : 





Number. 


Percentage. 






339 

105 

11 


75 




23 




2 








455 


100 



The number of graduates who proceeded to the degree of B. A. Sc. at 
the University examinations of 1904,. was twenty. The total number of 
graduates who have received the degree of B. A. Sc. is one hundred and 
forty-seven. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



2(J1 



£ TVT Ei S ht /T^ ? rad uates have received the degree of C. E., two the deeree 
o M. E. (Mining Engineer), three the degree" of M. E. Mechanical En! 
gmeer), and two the degree of E. E. in the University of Toronto 
Ine regular departments of instruction are : 
1. Civil Engineering. 
Mining Engineering. 
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. 
Architecture. 

Analytical and Applied Chemistry. 
Chemical Engineering. 
The following statement shows the courses of lectures and practical 
instruction, the instructors, and the number of students taking the various 
courses: ' b UUB 

§55555^^^ of Science. 



2. 

3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Subjects . 



inorganic 



Organic and 
chemistry 
Applied chemistry 
Electro chemistry. 



Geology 

Assaying 

Metallurgy 

Mining and ore dressing 
German 



Dynamics 

Strength of materials 

Theory of construction . . . 

Machine design 

Mechanics' of machinery . 

Compound stress 

Hydraulics ' 

Mortars and cements 

Thermodynamics and the- 
ory of the steam engine. 
French 



Statics 

Drawing 

Descriptive geometry 

Architecture [[ 

Plumbing, heating and ven- 
tilation 

Brick and stone masonry . . . 

Surveying 

Geodesy and astronomy . . . . 

Spherical trigonometry 

Least squares 



Electricity 

Magnetism ][[ 

Dynamo-electrical machin- 
ery .. .' 



Physics 



Instructors . 



W. H. Ellis, M.A.,M.B., Professor] 

J. W. Bain, B.A. Sc, Lecturer 

E.G.R.Ardagh,B.A.Sc.,Demonst'r 
S.Dushman,B.A M Fellow. 
E.Wade, Grad. S. P. S 



A.P.Coleman, M.A., Ph.D., ] 

Professor i 

G.R.Mickle, B.A., Lecturer! '.'.'.'" f 
J. G. McMillan, B.A. Sc, Fellow . . I 



J. Galbraith, M.A., Professor 

J. McGowan, B.A., Lecturer . . . 

R. W. Angus, B.A. Sc, Lecturer. . 

H. G. McVean, B.A. Sc, Demon- 
strator 

P. Gillespie, B.A. Sc, "Demon-" 
strator 



C. H. C. Wright, B. A. Sc, Profes- 1 
sor 

J . R . Cockburn, B.A. Sc ] Demon- ' | 
strator 

J . A . McFarlane, B.A. Sc \ Fellow I 

M . R . Riddell, Grad . S . P . S. , Fellow J 



L . B . Stewart, D . T . S. , Professor 
J . L . R . Parsons, B . A. , Fellow 
N.D.Wilson, B.A. Sc, Fello 



sor . . . \ 

7 I 

w ....J 



T R Rosebrugh, M. A., Professor. . 1 
H.W.Price, B.A. Sc, Demontrat'r. 

H . G . Smith, B. A. Sc. , Fellow f 

G.J.Manson, Grad.S.P.S., Fellow J 

G.R.Anderson, M. A., Lecturer 



Number of Students. 



2nd Term, 
Session 
1903-04. 



373 



152 



1st Term, 
Session 
1904-05. 



480 



193 



389 



480 



377 



373 



155 



447 



342 



221 



393 



262 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Subjects Taught by the Faculty of Arts. 



Subjects. 



Algebra • 

Euclid 

Plane trigonometry . 
Analytical geometry 

Calculus 

Astronomy 



Instructors. 



Alfred Baker, M.A., Professor 

A. T. DeLury, B. A., Associate Pro- 
fessor ,••-•• 

M. A. McKenzie, M.A., Associate 
Professor 

J. C. Fields, B.A.,Ph.D., Associ- 
ate Professor 

J. G. Parker, B.A., Fellow 



Number of Students. 



2nd Term, 
Session 
1903-04. 



288 



Physics', 



Biology 

Mineralogy ; 

Petrography * 

Electro chemistry. 



James Loudon, M.A., Professor. . . . "] 
W. J. Loudon, B. A. , Associate Pro- 

f essor 

J. C. McLennan, B.A., Ph.D., As- 
sociate Professor J 

R. Ramsey Wright, M.A., Professor 1 
T L.Walker, M. A., Ph.D., Professor 
A. W. Parks, B.A., Ph.D., Lecturer | 
W. L. Miller, M . A , Ph. D. , Associ- i 

ate Professor 

W. H. Collins, B.A., Class Assistant 
H. L. Kerr, B A., Class Assistant. . . J 



1st Term, 

Session 
1904-05. 



356 



276 



147 



235 



GENERAL. 

Statistics of Cost and Attendance, etc. 



Item, 



Annual Expenditure on maintenance... 
Annual fees paid into Provincial Treasury 

Annual net cost 

Teachers' Salaries 

Students in attendance 

Annual cost per student 

Teachers' Salaries per student 



Average 
from 1890 91 
to 1899-1900 
inclusive. 



S$23,235 92 

5,021 40 

18,214 52 

14,698 00 

138 

$132 00 

107 00 



1900-01. 



$32,792 98 

12,356 50 

20,436 48 

20,600 00 

231 

$88 00 

89 00 



1901-02. 



$34,910 73 

17,430 35 

17,480 38 

22,325 00 

290 

$60 00 

77 00 



1902-03. 



$39,793 77 

21,071 80 

18,721 97 

24,425 00 

341 

$55 00 

72 00 



1903-04. 



$44,619 29 

25,037 60 

19,581 69 

27.452 00 

402 

$49 00 

68 00 



From the above table it will be seen that the annual cost o the , School 
to the Province for the last fourteen years has been nearly stationary. The 
average annual cost for this period is $18,454.o9. 

The annual cost per student in attendance m 1903-04 was $49.00. 

The expenditure P <m teachers' salaries per student in attendance wa, 

|68 'The S e amounts are less even than the extraordinarily low figures for 
last vear They indicate the crowded state of the School and the _ msuffi- 
ciency of the present staff for the work. It will be necessary to make addi- 
"both to the numbers and to the salaries of *° tea^rtaff rf he 
reputation of the School is to be maintained. Of the 37 members or me 
teaching staff, there are 16 whose, salaries ?-"^. ^o^OO* 
average salary' of the whole teaching staff is about fl.OOU.UU. 



!904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



263 



In the above statements of the annual cost the interest on capital ex- 
penditure, depreciation and insurance are not incluued. 

The total expenditure on capital account (buildings and equipment) 
from 1877 to the session 1899-1900, inclusive, was $225,545.34. The annual 
expenditures since that time have been as follows : 1900-1901 $4 257 RO • 
1901-1902, 13,4927.13; 1902-1903, f 118,880.68; 1903-1904, $14404142 
making the total expenditure on capital account to the end of 1904' $527 - 
652.17 The great increases in the last three years are due to the new 
Lnemistry and Mining Building. 

liV™ 1 expenditure on insurance began in 1895, at which time it 
was f490. At present it is a 



Chemistry and Mining Building. 

This building will give much needed relief in the subjects of Applied 
Chemistry, Electro chemistry, Mineralogy, Geology, Mining and Metal- 

It has been found necessary to place the geological and mineraWical 
collections m rooms required for other purposes pending the construction of 
tne Museum wing which should be proceeded with immediately. 

Engineering Building. 

The subjects which remain in the old or "Engineering Building" are 
Strength and Elasticity of Materials, Statics, Dynamics, Theory of Con- 
struction, Machine Design, Mechanism, Hydrostatics, Hydraulics Thermo- 
dynamics and Theory of Heat Engines, Optics, Acoustics! Surveying Geo- 
desy and Astronomy, Descriptive Geometry, Drawing, Electricity, Electri- 
cal Machinery, Architecture, Plumbing, Heating and Ventilation Mortars 
and Cements, Masonry etc. The space vacated by the removal of Chemis- 
try, Mining, etc., to the new building is not at all suited for the necessary 
expansion m the above subjects. * 

The arrangement of the various laboratories in this building which 
were designed sixteen years ago, is now in many respects unsuited to the 
present conditions The new equipment which, has been added from time 
to time is installed wherever room can be found for it. The result is in 
convenience and difficulty in the use of the apparatus and a lack of system 
in the arrangement which must tend to produce an unfavorable impression 
in the mind of the visitor. The cause of the trouble is the rapid growth 
and increasing popularity of the School. These laboratories were designed 
tor a total student population of 150; whereas the number at nresent in 
attendance is 484. 

New Engineering Building. 

•J he i°ui ly fi medy is ^construction of a new Engineering building 
with as little delay as possible. This building must be near the Chemistry 
and Mining building, and yet not encroach upon the space occupied by the 
present engineering building as the work of instruction must be continued in 
tne latter until the new one is completed. 

■ii l n th ^ meantime the space vacated in the present Engineering building 
will be utilized as follows m providing for next year's work. The space in 
the basement will be fitted up with electrical apparatus and machinery 
that on the ground floor will be devoted to Optics and Hydrostatics and 



26 fe THE REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. No. 12 



that on the two upper floors to Architecture and Drawing. None of the 
space vacated can be used for expansion in Hydraulics, Thermodynamics 
or Mechanical tests of Materials on account of the great weight of the neces- 
sary machines and the amount of floor space required. A second experi- 
mental boiler is urgently required, but could not be installed to advantage 
in the present building. The additional equipment for next year's work 
must, in the meantime, be crowded into the space at present devoted to the 
above purposes. The accommodation for practical work in Astronomy 's 
entirely inadequate and should be enlarged before the beginning of the next 
session. . 

The recommendations made in submitting the Estimates will cover the 
additions to staff and equipment necessary for the year 1905. 

J. GALBKAITH, 

Principal. 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



265 



APPENDIX Q— ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 

To His Honor the Hon. William Mortimer Clark, 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario : 

May it Please Your Honor : 

I have the honor to submit the following report for the year ended 
June 30th, 1904 : 

The Teaching Staffs. 

The following is a tabular statement of the numbers engaged in teach- 
ing during the year in the faculties named. These numbers include the 
Arts staffs of University College and Victoria College : 





Arts. 


Medicine. 


Applied 




Science. 


Professors and Associate Professors 


42 
28 
29 


44 
12 
.34 


6 


Lecturers and Demonstrators 


6 


Instructors and other Assistants , 


9 








89 


90 


21 



Changes in the Staffs. 

The following paragraphs contain notes of the more important appoint- 
ments and promotions in the various Faculties : 

In the Department of Greek, Mr. A. Carruthers has been promoted to 
the rank of Associate Professor. 

In the Faculty of Medicine the following appointments have been made 
consequent on the amalgamation with the Medical Faculty of Trinity Uni- 
versity : 

Dr. H. B. Anderson to be Professor of Clinical Pathology and Associate 
Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Dr. A. M. Baines to be Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and 
Pediatrics. 

Dr. G. A. Bingham to be Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery and 
Clinical Anatomy. 

Dr. J. L. Davison to be Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Dr. J. T. Fotheringham to be Associate Professor of Medicine and 
Clinical Medicine. 

Dr. F. LeM. Grasett to be Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

Dr. J. C. Mitchell to be Extra-Mural Professor of Mental Diseases. 

Dr. N. A. Powell to be Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and Associ- 
ate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Dr. G. S. Ryerson to be Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Dr. C. Sheard to be Professor of Preventive Medicine. 

Dr. W. T. Stuart to be Associate Professor of Medical Chemistry. 

Dr. J. Algernon Temple to be Professor of Operative Obstetrics and 
Gynaecology. 

Dr. L. Tesky to be Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

Dr. D. J. Gibb Wishart to be Associate Professor in Laryngology and 
Rhinology. 

.3 E. (II) 



266 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Dr. G. H. Burnham, Associate Professor, to be Professor of Ophthal- 
mology and Otology. 

Dr. R. J. Dwyer, Lecturer in Medicine and Clinical Medicine, to be 
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Dr. A. R. Gordon, Lecturer, to be Associate Professor of Clinical Medi- 
cine. 

Dr. G. A. Peters, Associate Professor, to be Professor of Surgery and 
Clinical Surgery. 

Dr. R. D. Rudolf, Lecturer, to be Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Students in Arts, Medicine and Applied Science. 

Arts. 

(1) B. A. Course: 

Regular 777 

Occasional 182 

Graduate 35 

(2) Ph. D. course 18 

1,012 

Medicine. 



Regular .' 631 

Occasional 90 



Applied Science. 

Regular 398 

Occasional 4 



721 



402 

2,135 



Students in Affiliated Colleges. 

Ontario Agricultural College: 

Regular students 595 

Royal College of Dental Surgeons 190 

Ontario College of Pharmacy 140 

Toronto College of Music (proceeding to the degree of Mus. Bac.) 1 

Toronto Conservatory of Music (proceeding to the degree of Mus. Bac.) 

Total 3,061 

Candidates Examined. 

Arts 1,039 

Ph. D 1 

Medicine 593 

Law , 27 

Applied Science and Engineering 375 

Pedagogy ■ £ 

Agriculture <" 

Dentistry 164 

Pharmacy 71 

Music 367 

Physical Training 1 

Household Science 9 



Total 2,671 

Degrees Conferred. 

LL. D. (Hon.) ...'. 14 

Vh. D ' 1 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 2ti7 



Degrees Conferred. — Con. 

M. A 30 

B. A 141 

M. D 5 

M. B 108 

LL. B 12 

t>. D. S • 53 

B. A. Sc 19 

B. S. A 21 

D. Psed 1 

B. Psed 1 

Phm. B 63: 



462 
Diplomas and Certificates. 

Engineering 70 

Local Examinations in Music 282 

Licentiate in Music 2 

Physical Culture 1 



Total 355 

Progress of the University. 

With, a view of indicating the expansion and progress of the University 
in recent years I propose to submit, in the following paragraphs, some of 
the main facts regarding the increase in staff and students, in the various 
faculties, including some observations of a general nature upon the teaching. 

Arts Faculty. 

The following comparative table shows the increase in the staff and 
students in Arts for the last twelve years, inclusive of University and 
Victoria Colleges : 

1891-2. 1903-4. 

Professors and Associate Professors 24 42 

Lecturers 9 17 

Assistants 11 28 



44 87 

1891-2. 1903-4. 

Students in B. A. course 545 777 

Occasional students 134 182 

Graduate students 35 

Candidates for Ph. D 18 



679 1,012 

Not only have the numbers of the staff been increased considerably dur- 
ing this period, but also the scope of the teaching has been widened and 
its character improved in important respects. The increased scope of the 
teaching may be judged to some extent by a comparison of the present cur- 
riculum with that of. 1892. The honour departments have increased in 
number from nine to seventeen, indicating greater differentiation and more 
minute and concentrated treatment of the various branches of study. The 
methods of teaching have, in many cases, been greatly improved and in 
some cases almost completely revolutionized. Notwithstanding the num- 
erical additions to the staff it is worthy of note that at no time in the history 
of the University has the work of teaching on the whole been performed 
with as great energy and activity. 



268 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Under ordinary circumstances the attendance on classes is one of the 
most significant general indications of the efficiency of the work done by 
the staff in the class-room, and this is particularly so in the University of 
Toronto, where attendance is not wholly compulsory. There has been, I 
think, a distinct improvement in this respect, and there is no department 
or subject in which the attendance is found to be unsatisfactory. 

A fairly accurate index of efficiency may also be found in the demand 
which exists for our students to fill positions of various kinds, upon gradu- 
ation, particularly those of an academic nature, in which our standard as 
compared with other universities may be more readily judged. 

As a further indication of academic activity and energy on the part of 
the staff, I may mention the marked progress which has been made in the 
production of papers and other works involving original research. In the 
period mentioned our series of University Studies was established, and has 
proved most successful. In addition to this I might refer also to the lists 
of publications by members of the staff contained in the appendix to my 
annual reports of 1903 and 1904. 

Medical Faculty. 

The following table exhibits similar comparative statistics as regards 
the staff and students in the Faculty of Medicine : 

1891-2. 1903-4. 

^Professors and Associate Professors 16 38 

"Demonstrators and Assistants 13 31 

29 69 

1891-2. 1903-4. 

Regular students 286 631 

Occasional students 90 

286 721 

During this period the primary courses, which constitute the first two 
years of the Medical Curriculum, have been gradually improved, the scope 
of the work having been extended and the teaching rendered more thorough 
and practical. Special mention should perhaps be made of the departments 
of Materia Medica and Therapeutics which have been re-organized on a 
more scientific basis. 

Another notable improvement has been made in the organization of a 
combined six years' course in Arts and Medicine, which enables students to 
obtain the Arts degree as well as the professional degree in the period men- 
tioned. This has proved very attractive and is calculated to secure a higher 
type of medical practitioner. 

Owing to the increased numbers of the staff as a result of the recent 
federation, it has been possible to make better arrangements for Clinical 
instruction than was formerly possible. An important addition to the facili- 
ties for Clinical instruction has been made through the appointment of tutors 
in the department of Medicine. 

The establishment of post-graduate courses in various departments 
marks a distinct step in advance. 

I might say in conclusion that our medical graduates continue to be 
sought after, as in the past, to fill teaching positions in many of the best 

*These numbers are exclusive of those who are members of both the Arts and Medi- 
cal Faculties. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. *269 



schools of medicine in America and elsewhere. While the loss of such men 
to Canada is to be regretted, the fact of their success in academic work 
must be regarded as signal testimony to the excellent character of the train- 
ing given in this University. 

Faculty of Applied Science. 

The statistics relating to the staff and students in Applied Science are 
shown in the following table : 

1891-2. 1903-4. 

Professors 3 6 

Lecturers , 4 6 

Assistants 2 9 

9 21 

1891-2. 1903-4. 

Regular students 118 393 

Special students 8 4 

126 402 

Research Work. 

In my previous reports, I have upon several occasions emphasized the 
importance of research as regards the future development of the University 
and the promotion of higher ideals in University work. I am gratified to 
report that, during the course of the year, the department of Mathematics 
has been added to the list of those offering graduate courses for research, 
leading to the degree of Ph.D. I consider it more than ever desirable that 
the scheme should be extended so as to include the remaining Arts Depart- 
ments, viz. : Classics, Modern Languages, and History. 

A list of publications by members of the various faculties or by ad- 
vanced students will be found in the Appendix. Attention is directed to 
the fact that only a small number of these have appeared in the periodical 
issued under the name of "University Studies". Considering the import- 
ance of the object aimed at in this periodical, viz. : The publication of ori- 
ginal papers by members of the University, it would be desirable to increase 
the very limited appropriation which has heretofore been placed at the dis- 
posal of the committee in charge. For report of the general Editor of the 
"University of Toronto Studies", see Addendum J. 

Special University Lectures. 

The usual course of Saturday popular lectures was delivered in Janu- 
ary and February by Professor R. Gr. Moulton, Hon. George E. Foster, Pro- 
fessor J. C. McLennan, Mr. W. B. Yeats, Professor Ramsay Wright and 
Professor A. P. Coleman. 

In addition to the above the following special lectures were delivered 
during the session 1903-1904 : 

Dr. W. H. Gaskell, F.E.S., Cambridge, Eng., on the "Origin of the 
Vertebrates". 

Professor W. D. Halliburton, F.R.S., Professor of Physiology, King's 
College, London, on the "Degeneration and Regeneration of Nerves". 

Professor C. S. Sherrington, F.R.S., Holt Professor of Physiology in 
the University of Liverpool, the inaugural lecture on the occasion of the 



270 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



formal opening of the new Medical Buildings on October 1st, the subject 
being, "The Progress of Medicine in connection with the advances made 
in the Cognate Sciences". 

The Library. 

From the report of the Librarian, which is appended, it will be seen 
that the total accumulation of books in the Library since the destruction 
of the former Library by fire in 1890, now amounts to 77,558 and upwards 
of 20,000 pamphlets. The number of volumes added during the year was 
2,717, of which 483 were presented to the Library. In my last report I 
referred to the necessity for increasing the annual appropriation for the 
purchase of books, and I am gratified to be able to state that since that 
time a step has been taken in the desired direction. In my last report I re- 
ferred to the necessity for increased accommodation in the Library Build- 
ing. Owing to the crowded condition of the stack-room, the administrative 
offices and the reading-rooms, it will become imperatively necessary to ma%e 
provision for extension of the building within two or three years. 

New Buildings. 

The building for Applied Chemistry, Mineralogy, Geology and Mining, 
the erection of which was begun in 1902, is at present about completed, and 
is in part available for the purposes of instruction. 

During the year it was decided to make a beginning in the direction 
of a residence for the women students of University College. For this pur- 
pose a house situated upon University lands in Queen's Park was purchased 
by the Trustees, and has since been fitted up and occupied as a residence. 
The building i3 known as Queen's Hall, and affords accommodation for 
about twenty students. 

Owing to the increased importance of Household Science, and its re- 
cognition as a graduating department in the University, the necessity for a 
special building for the purposes of the department has been apparent for 
some time. I am gratified to report that in view of this necessity Mrs. 
Massey-Treble has generously offered to contribute the cost of erection of 
a suitable building, the site f«r which has been already chosen and the plans 
prepared. 

Building Requirements. 

In previous reports I have referred to the erection of a new building 
for the Department of Physics as the most urgent necessity of the Univer- 
sity. The urgency of this claim has been recognized and the Trustees have 
been informed that provision has been made for its erection from the pro- 
ceeds of the sale of the old Parliament Buildings block. 

As stated in my last report a sum of upwards of $51,000 has been sub- 
scribed by Alumni and friends of the University for the erection of a Con- 
vocation Hall. This sum has been supplemented by a grant of $50,000 by 
vote of the Legislature. Unfortunately, owing to the increased cost of 
building, the total sum avaibale is still insufficient, and an additional sum 
of $50,000 will be required to meet the total estimated expenditure. In 
view of the importance of the project itself, and in view of the generosity 
of the Alumni and friends, it is to be hoped that means will be devised to 
procure the amount necessary for its realization in the near future. 



1904 ' EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 271 



In view of the desirability of affording residential . accommodation to 
women students in attendance at the University from various parts of the 
Province, and in view of the increased demand for such accommodation, I 
would recommend that the present limited facilities in this respect be in- 
creased as soon as feasible. 

In my last report I referred to the insufficient accommodation provided 
in the new Science Building for a Mineralogical and Geological Museum. 
The space of 4,000 sq. ft. temporarily allotted to this purpose is so entirely 
inadequate that immediate steps should be taken towards the erection of 
the museum wing of the Science Building as contemplated in the original 
plans. 

In my report of last year, the better equipment of the department of 
Botany was urged, and it was shown at the same .time that the subject had 
not as yet received in the University the attention and encouragement which 
its importance demands. In this direction hardly a beginning has been 
made. A full equipment in the way of buildings would consist of a Botani- 
cal Laboratory (including museum) with plant houses attached. I strongly 
recommend, as a partial provision for the desired facilities, the erection at 
a very early date of the Plant Houses above referred to. 

Besides the more pressing building necessities referred to above, men- 
tion should also be made of the following additions which will be required 
for the full and symmetrical development of the University in the near 
future : (1) A residence for men; (2) an administration building; (3) a 
central plant for the economical supply of heat, light and power to the 
whole group of University buildings; (4) the further extension of the pre- 
sent Biological building. 

New Teaching Departments. 

In view of the present importance of the subject of Botany, whether 
regarded from the scientific or the economic standpoint, it is highly desir- 
able that there should be established in the University as soon as possible 
a lectureship in Vegetable Physiology, in which both the chemical and the 
physical aspects of the physiology of plant life would be adequately treated. 
This addition is necessary to supplement the work already being done in 
Botany on its morphological side. 

In the University Act the subject of Education is specifically men- 
tioned as one of those to be taught in the University. No provision, how- 
ever, has hitherto been made in this direction. That it is the duty of a 
University to afford teaching in this subject has come to be generally recog- 
nized by educationists, and a department of Education indeed is provided 
for in the leading Universities of this continent. Such a department would 
he of the greatest possible benefit to those intending to enter the teaching 
profession, who form a considerable portion of the student body. In this 
connection it is worthy of consideration whether it would not be to the best 
interests of the professional training of teachers to transfer the work of the 
Normal College to the Provincial University. The advantages which would 
by this step accrue to the teachers in training through access to the facili- 
ties of the University in all departments would, in my opinion, prove of 
incalculable value. 

In my last report I directed attention to the importance of providing 
systematic training in at least the fundamental principles of public speak- 
ing. During the present session an experiment has been made in this di- 
rection on a small scale, but with such gratifying results that I feel justi- 



272 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



fied in recommending that permanent provision be made for establishing 
an instructorship in the subject. 

Other Requirements. 

In view of recent enactments of the senate to provide facilities for stu- 
dents who find it impossible to attend full courses at the University, and 
especially as making provision for teachers who require additional instruc- 
tion in the subject of nature study, I consider it desirable that steps should 
be taken as soon as possible towards the establishment of a summer session 
in connection with the University. 

Finances. 

The following figures exhibit the total revenues and expenditures for 
the three Faculties of Arts (University and University College), Medicine, 
and Applied Science and Engineering. 

Revenue. Expenditure. 

Arts $162,887 05 $193,094 59 

Medicine 64,296 97 64,296 97 

Applied Science and Engineering 48,103 69 . 48,103 69 

Details of these figures will be found in the Addendum. The deficit 
in Arts was met by a Legislative grant. 

The figures relating to Applied Science and Engineering are extracted 
mainly from the public accounts of the Province, the financial administra- 
tion of the School of Practical Science being directly under Government 
control. The net cost of the School to the Province would appear to be 
$19,581.69. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 

J. LOUDON, 

President. 
Toronto, April 10th, 1905. 



ADDENDUM A.— REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF 

ARTS. 

University of Toronto. 
James Loudon, Esq., LL.D., March 22nd, 1905. 

President of the University of Toronto. 

Sir : I beg to submit herewith a detailed list, for the academic year 
1903-04, of the personnel of the teaching staff of the Faculty of Arts of the 
University of Toronto, and also statistics as to the attendance of students in 
the various subjects taught by the members of the staff. As will be seen, cer- 
tain classes are taken advantage of by students of the Faculties of Medicine 
and Applied Science. 

Faculty of Arts. 
Physics : 

Professor, James Loudon, M.A., LL.D. 
Associate-Professor, W. J. Loudon, B.A. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 273 



Associate-Professor, J. C. McLennan, B.A., Ph.D. 
Lecturer, C. A. Chant, M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Demonstrator, E. F. Burton, B.A. 
Lecture Assistant, W. P. Near, B.A. 
Class-Assistant, A. Thomson, B.A. 
Class-Assistant, A. G. McPhedran, B.A. 
Class-Assistant, M. E. Gowland, B.A. 

Mathematics : 

Professor, Alfred Baker, M.A. 
Associate-Professor, A. T. DeLury, M. A. 
Lecturer, J. C. Fields, B.A., Ph. D. 
Assistant, L. K. File, B.A. 

Chemistry : 

Professor, W. R. Lang, D.Sc, F.C.S., F.I.C. 

Associate-Professor of Physical Chemistry, W. L. Miller, B.A., Ph.D. 

Lecturer, F. B. Allan, M.A., Ph. D. 

Lecturer, F. B. Kendrick, M. A., Ph. D. 

Assistant, C. M. Carson, B.A. 

Fellow, R. E. DeLury, B.A. 

Junior-Assistant, E. Forster, B.A. 

Junior-Assistant, E. H. Jolliffe, B.A. 

Biology : 

Professor, R. Ramsay Wright, M.A., LL. D. 

Lecturer in Zoology, B. A. Bensley, B.A., Ph. D. 

Lecturer in Elementary Biology and Histology, W. H. Piersol, B.A., 
M.B. 

Lecturer in Botany, J. H. Faull, B.A. 

Instructor in Botany, R. B. Thomson, B.A. 

Lecture and Laboratory Assistant in Biology, M.D. McKichan, B.A., 

Class-Assistants, E. A. McCulloch, B.A. ; M. H. Embree, B.A., A. H. 
Adams, B.A.; A. C. Hendrick, M.A., M.B.,; W. J. 0. Malloch, B.A., M.B. ; 
A. J. McKenzie, B.A., LL.B., M.B.; A. Henderson, B.A. ; J. D. Loudon, 
B.A.; F. J. Munn, B.A. ; H. M. McNeil, B.A. 

Physiology : 

Professor, A. B. Macallum, M.A., M.B., Ph.D. 

Demonstrator, F. H. Scott, B.A., Ph.D. 

Class-Assistants, W. J. 0. Malloch, B.A., M.B.; A. C. Hendrick, M.A., 
M.B.; S. H. Westman, M.B; D. McGillivray, M:B. 

Geology and Palaeontology : 

Professor, A. P. Coleman, M.A., Ph.D. 
Lecturer, W. A. Parks, B.A., Ph. D. 

Mineralogy and Petrography : 

Professor, T. L. Walker, M.A., Ph.D. 

Lecturer, W. A. Parks, B.A., Ph. D. 

Class-Assistants, H. L. Kerr, B.A.; M. T. Culbert, B.A. Sc. 

Comparative Philology : 

Professor, Maurice Hutton, M.A., LL.D. 



274 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Modern History : 

Professor, G. M. Wrong, M.A. 

Political Economy : .^. 

Professor, James Mavor. 

Lecturer, S. M. Wickett, B.A., Ph. D. 

Philosophy : 

Professor of History of Philosophy, J. G. Hume, M.A., Ph. D. 

Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Psychological 

Laboratory, A. Kirschmann, M.A., Ph. D. 

Lecturer, F. Tracy, B.A., Ph.D. 

Lecturer and Assistant in Psychological Laboratory, A.H. Abbott, B.A., 
Ph. D. 

Assistant in Psychological Laboratory, T. P. Robinson, B.A. 

Italian and Spanish : 

Professor, W. H. Fraser, M.A. 

Lecturer, F. J. A. Davidson, M.A., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Italian, E. J. Sacco. 

Roman Law, Jurisprudence, and History of English Law : 
Professor, A. H. F. Lefroy, M.A. 

Constitutional and International Law and Constitutional History : 
Professor, J. M. Young, M.A. 

The following tables exhibit the numbers attending lectures in Univer- 
sity subjects, together with the numbers of those taking the practical work in 
the laboratories : 

Mathematics. 






Pass. 


Pass and Honors. 
Honors. 




140 




33 


Arts— First:Year' 





43 


Third Year 

Fourth Year • 


28*'" 


182'" 


13 
9 


Applied Science— First \ ear 






101 




16S 


182 


199 




. 





Physics. 













Pass. 


Pass and 
Honors. 


Honors. 


L aboratory 


Arts— First Year 




27 
8 
2 


60 


86"" 


27 

35 

13 

9 

158" 


Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Ph. D. Students 1 

Medicine— First Year 






13 
9 

136'" 

158 
104 


Applied Science— First ^ ear 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Totals ••••... 




37 




73 


60 


455 


419 



1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



275 



BlOLOGT. 





Pass. 


Pass and 
Honors. 


Honors. 


Lab. 






103 


45 ^ 


2 
28 
16 
10 


47 




28 


Third Year 






16 








10 






147 
130 


147 








130 










Totals 


103 


322 


56 


378 



Physiology. 





Pass. 


Pass and 
Honors. 


Honors. 


Lab 












28 
10 


28 








10 






147 
130 










130 










Totals 




277 


38 


168 










Chemistry. 





Pass. 


Pass and 
Honors . 


Honors. 


Lab. 












78 
55 
25 
13 


78 




4 




55 






25 








13 




♦ 




2 






147 
130 




147 








130 






2 












Totals 


4 


277 


173 


450 







Geology. 






Pass. 


Pass and 
Honors. 


Honors. 


Lab. 








49 
7 

16 
1 






90 






Third Year 














Ph D. Students 












87 
39 


















6 












Totals 


90 


126 


79 





276 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Mineralogy. 



1 


Pass. 


Pass and 
Honors. 


Honors. 


Lab. 




Arts— Second Year 






20 
8 
5 

88 
60 


20 
8 
5 
88 
60 
13 


Third Year 






Fourth Year 






Applied Science— First Year 






Second Year 






Third Year 






Fourth Year 
















Totals 



















Philosophy. 





Logic. 


Psychology. 


History of 
Philosophy 


Philosophy 












Pass. 


Honors. 


Pass. 


Laboratory 


Honors. 


Honors . 


Second Year 


119 


35 


137 


35 
21 

25 




35 


Third Year 


24 




J ourth Year i 






20 


.. . . 


Graduate Students 








Ph. D. Students 
























Totals 


119 


35 


157 


81 


21 


35 











Political Science and History. 





Economics. 


History. 


Constitutional History. 


Law. 




Pass. 


Honors. 


Pass. 


Honors. 


Pass. 


Honors. 


Honors. 






25 
45 
20 


61 
41 
40 


45 

54 
28 




35 
22 

26 




Third Year 


10 
14 
3 


30 
34 


27 


Fourth Year 


28 
































Totals 


27 


95 


142 


127 


61 »3 


55 



Italian, Spanish and Phonetics. 





Italian. 


Spanish. 


Phonetici. 




Honors. 


Pass. 


Honors. 


Honors. 




47 

25 
8 
10 


25 
2 




67 




11 
3 
8 




















Totals . 


90 


27 


17 


67 







1904 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



277 



I also subjoin statistics as to the courses selected by regular students pro- 
ceeding to a degree in Arts in the University. Tbe following table indicates 
whether the students in question are enrolled in University College or Vic- 
toria College : 





First Year. 


Second Year. 


Third Year. 


Fourth Year. 




U. C. 


V. C. 


U. C. 


V. C. 


U. C. 


V. C. 






U. C. 


V. C. 


Classics 


15 
17 
39 


3 

3 

16 


9 

10 

22 

3 


4 
3 
7 
3 


8 

9 

21 

1 

3 

21 

12 

13 

1 

4 

7 

1 

5 


5 
2 
9 


10 
2 

18 
2 


2 


English and History 

Modern Languages 


1 
4 


Oriental Languages 


2 


History 










Political Science 






22 

20 

10 

7 

9 


4 
13 
5 
3 
3 


2 
6 
1 


20 
19 
12 
2 
4 
6 


3 


Philosophy 






10 


Mathematics and Physics 


16 


8 


5 


Physics and Chemistry 




Chemistry and Mineralogy 






3 

1 




Natural Science I 








Natural Science II 






8 
14 






Biological and Physical Sciences. 






3 

2 


2 


1 


3 


Household Science 


2 

34 

2 

58 


5 
6 




Science 












Commercial 














General Course 


32 


18 


10 


15 


12 


17 


17 







I am, Sir, Yours faithfully, 

(Sgd.) R. Ramsay Wright, 

Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 

ADDENDUM B.— -REPORT OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. 

Principal, Maurice Hutton, M.A., LL.D. 

Greek : 

Professor, Maurice Hutton, M.A., LL.D. 
Associate-Professor, Adam Carruthers, M.A. 

Latin : 

Professor, John Fletcher, M.A., LL.D. 

Associate-Professor of Ancient History, W. S. Milner, M.A. 

Lecturer, G. W. Johnston, B.A., Ph.D. 

English : 

Professor, W. J. Alexander, B.A., Ph. D. 
Associate-Professor of Anglo-Saxon, D. R. Keys, M.A. 

German : 

Professor, W. H. Yander Smissen, M.A. 
Lecturer, G. H. Needier, B.A., Ph. D. 
Instructor, P. Toews, M.A., Ph. D. 

French : 

Professor, John Squair, B.A. 
Associate-Professor, John Home Cameron, M.A. 
Instructor, St. Elme de Champ, B es L. 

Oriental Literature : 

Professor, J. F. McCurdy, Ph.D. LL.D. 
Lecturer, R. G. Murison, M.A., Ph.D. 

Ethics : 

Professor, J. G. Hume, M.A., Ph. D. 



278 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



The following table exhibits the number of students in attendance dur- 
ing the session : 

First Year : 

Regular „ 174 

Occasional 19 

193 

Second Year: 

Regular 143 

Occasional 14 

157 

Third Year: 

Regular 121 

Occasional 15 

136 

Fourth Year: 

Regular 105 

Occasional 31 

136 

Graduates 27 

Ph. D ; 4 



653 



The following tables exhibit the number of students in attendance upon 
lectures in subjects of the General and Honor Courses : 

General Course. 






Greek. 


Latin . 


Ancient 
History. 


English. 


German. 


French . 


Oriental. 


:Ethic«. 




22 

16 

3 

2 


132 

52 
26 

15 


52 


110 

119 

73 

39 


75 
41 
13 
10 


85 
40 

15 
9 


34 

14 

3 

5 












57 














Totals 


- 
43 


225 


52 


341 


139 


149 


56 


" 



Honor Course. 






Greek. 


Latin. 


Ancient 
History. 


English. 


German. 


French. 


Oriental. 


Ethics. 




17 
14 
11 
13 


15 
12 
12 
15 


17 
32 
19 
12 
1 


71 
35 
30 
41 


44 
25 
21 
15 


61 
26 
23 
20 








3 
1 
2 
3 




Third Year 


IS 






Ph. D. Students 




Totals j 55 


54 


81 


174 


105 


130 


9 


13 



ADDENDUM C.-VICTOEIA UNIVERSITY. 



Rev. Nathanael Burwash, S.T.D., LL.D., F.E.SJC., President. 

Rev. Alfred H. Eeynar, M. A., LL.D., Dean of the Faculty of Arts and 
William Gooderham Professor of English Literature. 

A. E. Bain, M.A., LL.D., Nelles Professor of Ancient History. 

Eev. E. I. Badgley, M.A., LL.D., Egerton Eyerson Professor of Mental 
and Moral Philosophy. 

Eev. Frances Huston Wallace, M.A., D.D., Dean of Faculty of Theology, 
and Geo. A. Cox Professor of Biblical Greek. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 27$ 



A. J. Bell, M.A., Ph.D. (Bresl.), Macdonald Professor of Latin Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

Rev. John Burwash, M.A., D.Sc, LL.D., H. A. Massey Professor of Eng- 
lish Bible. 

L. E. Horning, M.A., Ph. D. (Geottingen), Professor of German and 
Old English. 

Rev. J. F. McLaughlin, B.A., B.D., Eliza Phelps Massey Professor of 
Oriental Languages and Literature. 

J. C. Robertson, B.A., W. E. H. Massey Professor of the Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

Pelham Edgar, Ph.D., Eliza Gooderham Professor of the French Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

A. L. Langford, M.A., Associate-Professor of the Greek Language and 
Literature. 

A. E. Lang, M.A., Associate-Professor of the German Language and 
Literature. 

E Masson, Instructor in French. 

A. P. Misener, M.A., Lecturer in Oriental Languages and Literature. 

The following table exhibits the number of Arts students in attendance 
during the session 1903-04 : 

First Year: 

Regular 87 

Occasional 9 

96 

Second Year: 

Regular 57 

Occasional 18 

75 

Third Year: 

Regular 43 

Occasional 18 

61 

Fourth Year: 

Regular 47 

Occasional 13 

60 

Graduates : 

Occasional 8 

Ph. D 1 

9 

301 

ADDENDUM D.— FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Professor R. A. Reeve, B.A., M.D., 

LL.D. 

Professores Emeriti : 

James Thorburn, M.D.; M. H. Aikins, M.D.; W. W. Ogden, M.D.; J. 
H. Richardson, M.D., Uzziel Ogden, M.D. 

Professors of Surgery and Clinical Surgery : 

I. H. Cameron, M.B., Tor., F.R.C.S., Eng. ; F. LeM. Grasett, M. D. 
CM., F.R.C.S., Edin.; G. A. Peters, M.B., Tor., F.R.C.S., Eng.; L. Tes- 
key, M.D., C.M.,Trin. 

Associate-Professor of Clinical Surgery and Clinical Anatomy : 
G. A. Bingham, M.D., CM., Trin., M.B. Tor. 



280 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Associate-Professors of Clinical Surgery : 

A. Primrose, M.B., CM., Edin. ; N. A. Powell, M.D., CM., Trin. ; 
M.D., Bellevue, N. Y. ; W. Oldright, M.A., M.D., Tor.; H. A. Brucji, M.B., 
Tt., F.R.C.S., Eng.; F. N. G. Starr, M.B., Tor. 

Associate-Professor of Clinical Surgery in charge of Orthopeodics : 
C. L. Starr, M.B., Tor. 

Demonstrators of Clinical Surgery : 

W. McKeown, B.A., M.B., Tor.; C A. Temple, M.D., CM., Trin.; A. H. 
Garratt, M.D., CM., Trin.; C B. Shuttleworth, M.D., C M., Trin., 
F.R.C.S., Eng.; T. B. Richardson, M.D.,CM., Trin., F.R.C.S., Edin.; J. 
F. Uren, M.D., CM., Trin. 

Professor and Director of the Anatomical Department : 
A. Primrose, M.B., CM., Edin. 

Associate-Professor of Anatomy : 

H. W. Aikins, B.A., M.B., Tor. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy : 

C B. Shuttleworth, M.D., CM., Trin., F.R.C.S., Eng. 

Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy : 

W. J. McColum, M.B., Tor. ; W. J. 0. Malloch, B.A., M.B., Tor.; S. H. 
Westman, M.B., Tor.; G. Elliott, M.D., CM., Trin.; E.R. Hooper, B.A., 
M.B., Tor.; W. J. Wilson, M.B., Tor.; A. C Hendrick, M.A., M.B., Tor.; 

C. P. Lusk, M.D., CM., Trin.; A. J. MacKenzie, B.A., LL.B., M.B., Tor.; 

D. McGillivray, M.B., Tor.; E. S. Ryerson, M.D., CM., Trin.; F. W. Mar- 
low, M.D., CM., Trin.; F.R.C.S., Eng. 

P ofessor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine : 
A. McPhedran, M.B., Tor. 

Associate Professors of Medicine : 

J. T. Fotheringham, B.A., Tor.; M.D., CM., Trio; R. D. Rudolf,M. 
D., CM., Edin., M.R. C.P., Lond. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine : 

J. L. Davison, B.A., Tor., M.D., CM., Trin. 

Associate-Professors of Clinical Medicine : 

A. M. Baines, M.D., CM., Trin.; W. P. Caven, M. B., Tor.; W. B. 
Thistle, M.B., Tor.; J. T. Fotheringham, B.A., Tor., M.D., CM., Trin. ; 
A.R. Gordon, M.B., Tor.; R. J. Dwyer, M.B., Tor., M.R.C.P., Lond.; H. 
B. Anderson, M.D., CM., Trin. 

Associates in Clinical Medicine : 

G. Boyd, B.A., M.B., Tor.; F. Fenton, M.D., CM., Trin.; H. C Par- 
sons, B. A., M.D., C M., Trin.; W. Goldie, M.B., Tor. 

Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology and Curator of the Museum and 
Laboratories : 
J. J. Mackenzie, B.A., M.B., Tor. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 281 



Professor of Clinical Pathology : 

H. B. Anderson, M.D., CM., Trin. 

Associate-Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology : 
J. A. Amyot, M.B., Tor. 

Laboratory Assistant in Bacteriology : 
T. D. Archibald, B.A., M.B., Tor. 

Demonstrators in Pathology : 

G. Silverthorn, M.B., Tor.; C. J. Wagner, M.B., Tor. 

Assistant Demonstrators of Pathology : 

W. H. Pepler, M.D., CM., Trin.; H. C Parsons, B.A., M.D., CM., 
Trin.; M. M. Crawford, M.B., Tor.; F. A. Clarkson, M.B., Tor.; R.H. Mul- 
lin, M.B., Tor.; E. S. Ryerson, M.D., CM., Trin. 

Assistants in Clinical Laboratory : 

H. S. Hutchison, M.B., Tor.; W. N. Meldrum, M.B., Tor. 

Professor of Preventive Medicine : 
C Sheard, M.D., CM., Trin. 

Professor of Materia Medica, Pharmacology and Therapeutics : 
J. M. MacCallum, B.A., M.B., Tor. 

Professor of Gynaecology and Operative Obstetrics : 
J. Algernon Temple, M.D., CM., McGill. 

Professor of Obstetrics : 

A. H. Wright, B.A., M.B., Tor. 

Professor of Gynaecology : 

J. F. W. Ross, M.B., Tor. 

Asosciate-Professor of Obstetrics and Pediatrics : 
H. T. Machell, M.B., Tor. 

Associate-Professor of Pediatrics : 

A. M. Baines, M.D., CM., Trin. 

Associates in Obstetrics : 

K. C Mcllwraith, M.B., Tor.; F. Fenton, M.D., CM., Trin. 

Professors of Ophthalmology and Otology : 

R. A. Reeve, B.A., M.D., LL.D., Tor.; G. S. Ryerson, M.D., C M. 
Trin.; G. H. Burnham, M.D., Tor., F.R.C.S., Edin. 

Associates in Ophthalmology and Otology : 

C Trow, M.D., CM., Trin; J. M. MacCallum, B.A., M.B., Tor. 

Professor of Laryngology and Rhinology : 
G. R. McDonagh, M.B. (Tor.) 
4 E. (II.) 



282 THE REPORT OF THE No. \Z 



Associate-Professor of Laryngology and Rhinology : 

D. J. G. Wishart, B.A., Tor., M.D., CM., McGill. 



Associate of Laryngology and Rhinology : 
G. Boyd, B.A., M.B., Tor. 

Professor of Hygiene : 

W.. Oldright, M.A., M.B., Tor. 

Professor of Toxicology : ■ 

W. H. Ellis, M.A., Tor. 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence : 

N. A. Powell, M.D., CM., Trin., M.D., Bellevue, N.T. 

Extra-Mural Professom of Mental Diseases : 

N. H. Beemer, M.B., Tor.; J. C Mitchell, M.D.,.CM., Trin. 

Professor of Physics : 

James Loudon, M.A., LL.D., Tor. 

Lecturer on Physics : 

C A. Chant, B.A., Tor., Ph. D., Harv. 

Professor of Chemistry : 

W. R. Lang, D.Sc, Glasg. 

Associate-Professor of Medical Chemistry : 
W. T. Stuart, M.D., CM., Trin. 

Lecturers in Chemistry : 

F. B. Kenrick, M.A., Tor., Ph. D., Leip. ; F. B. Allan, M.A., Ph. D. r 
Tor. 

Professor of Biology : 

R. Ramsay Wright, M.A., B. Sc. Edin. LL.D., Tor. 

Lecturer in Zoology : 

B. A. Bensley, B.A., Tor., Ph. D., Col. 

Lecturer in Elementary Biology and Histology : 
W. H. Piersol, M.B., Tor. 

Fiofessor of Physiology : 

A. B. Macallum, M.A., M.B., Tor., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Demonstrator of Physiology : 

F. H. Scott, B.A., Ph. D., Tor. 

Assistant Demonstrators of Physiology : 

W. J. 0. Malloch, B.A., M.B., Tor. ; S. H. Westman, M.B., Tor. ; A. C 
Iiondrick, M.A., M. B., Tor.; D. McGillivray, M.B., Tor. 

The following table exhibits the number of students registered as in at- 
tendance upon the lectures given by the staff of the Faculty of Medicine : 

Graduate Students •* 

Fourth' Year Students 15;*" 

Third Year Students 170 

Second Year Students 134 

First Year Students 160 

Occasional Students °0 

Total ^ 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 283 



ADDENDUM E.— APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

Dean of the Faculty, Principal Galbraith, M.A., LL.D. 

Chemistry : 

Professor, W. H. Ellis, M.A., M.B. 
Lecturer, J. W. Bain, B.A. Sc. 
Fellow, E. G. R. Ardagh, B.A. Sc. 
Fellow, C. G. Williams, Grad. S.P.S. 
Lecture Assistant, F. G. Marriott, Grad. S.P.S. 

Geology, Mining and Metallurgy : 

Professor, A. P. Coleman, Ph.D. 
Lecturer, G. R. Mickle, B.A. 
Fellow, J. G. McMillan, B.A.Sc. 

Applied Mechanics : 

Professor, J. Galbraith, M. A. 
Lecturer, J. McGowan, B.A., B.A.Sc. 
Lecturer, 11. W. Angus, B.A. Sc. 
Demonstrator, H. G. McVean, B.A.Sc. 
Fellow, A. E. Davison, Grad. S.P.S. 

Architecture and Drawing : 

Professor, C. H. C. Wright, B.A.Sc. 
Fellow, S. B. Wass, Grad. S.P.S. 
Fellow, J. R. Cockburn, B.A.Sc. 

Surveying and Geodesy : 

Professor, L. B. Stewart, D.T.S. 
Fellow, J. L. R. Parsons, B.A. 

Electricity : 

Professor, T. R. Rosebrugh, M.A. 
Demonstrator, H. W. Price, B.A.Sc. 
Fellow, H. M. Shipe, Grad. S.P.S. 

Number of Students by Years. 

First year 187 

Second year 106 

Third year 85 

Fourth year 20 

Occasional 4 



402 
Number of Students by Departments. 

1. Civil Engineers 140 

2. ' Mining Engineers 50 

3. Mechanical and Electrical Engineers 197 

4. Architecture 4 

£. Applied Chemistry 11 

402 



284 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



ADDENDUM F.— THE LIBRARY. 

The Librarian of the University begs to submit his annual report for the 
year ending June 30th, 1904 : 

1. The number of bound volumes added to the Library during the year 
was 2,717, of which 483 were presentations, making the total contents of the 
Library 77,558 volumes. The number of pamphlets added during the year 
was 1,403. The total number pamphlets, of which no accurate account was 
kept until the last few years, now exceeds 20,000. 

2. During the session 1903-4 the average continuous number of readers 
in the reading-room is estimated at 62. The largest number counted was 
126 in the morning of April 18th. The statistics of the use of books by stu- 
dents are as follows, comparison being made with similar statistics for the 
previous year. 

1902-3 1903-4 

Average No. of books read in the reading-room during term per week 819 768 

Average No. of books borrowed by students over night per week 328 338 

Total No. of books taken out by students for periods longer than one 

night 2,788 3,390 

Under the arrangement for giving students access to the stack-room on 
recommendation of a professor, 33 persons were admitted during the year for 
various periods ; the number for the previous year was 34. 

3. The number of institutions and learned societies on the exchange list 
of the Library, to which the University of Toronto Studies and the Univer- 
sity Calendar and Examination Papers are sent is now 261. The Library re- 
ceives 280 periodicals and serial publications in return, besides University 
calendars and many occasional publications from Institutions included in the 
above total of 261 to which the University's publications are sent. 

4. In recognition of the urgent need for more money to spend on books, 
to which attention was directed in the report of last year, the appropriation 
for the coming year out of ordinary income has been raised from $2,600 to 
$3,000. The supplementary allowance from the unexpended remainder of 
insurance-money on the old library has also been increased from $3,400 to 
$3,500, so as to make the total appropriation to the Library for the year 
$6,500 instead of $6,000 as heretofore. The increase, while not affording 
any substantial relief to the pressure upon the finances of the Library, is 
gratifying as a recognition that the necessities of the Library are recognized. 

5. In last year's report attention was also directed to the lack of ac- 
commodation in the building for reading-room and administrative purposes 
and to the probability of the stack-room being filled with books to its full 
working capacity within two years. The subject having subsequently been 
bi ought by the Library Committee before the Board of Trustees, the archi- 
tect was instructed to prepare a comprehensive plan for future extensions of 
the Library building. 

6. A handsome donation was made to the Library during the year, con- 
sisting of over 100 volumes of rare and valuable works on Roman and Civil 
Law, from the Library of the late Professor of Roman Law in the University, 
the Honourable William Proudfoot, presented by his executors. Another 
valuable addition to the Library was made through the kindness of the Pre- 
mier and Members of the Government of Ontario, to whom application was 
made for leave to bid at the sale of a private library in Germany, exception- 
ally rich in works relating to the history of the German drama. By their 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 285 



permission f 1,000, outside of the regular Library appropriation, was spent 
at this sale, and a valuable collection of periodicals and monographs on the 
subject in question acquired. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) H. H. Langton, 

Librarian. 

ADDENDUM G.— BIOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

April 8, 1905. 
To President Loudon. 

Sir : I beg to report as follows with regard to the condition of the Bio- 
logical Museum, during the present academical year : 

1. The most important change which has occurred is the removal of the 
Ferrier Collection of Minerals to the new building for Geology and Mineral- 
ogy. This renders the north half of the upper floor available for the purpose 
for which it was originally intended — the accommodation of the -Botanical 
side of the Museum. Already a large collection of models is awaiting a suit- 
able display in cases, and during the summer it is intended that a large 
amount of illustrative material shall be collected with the help of the appro- 
priation made for this purpose. It is, however, indispensable that cases be 
provided, and I venture to hope that a suitable sum will be placed in the es- 
timates to provide these. 

Should special buildings be erected, as is urged elsewhere, devoted ex- 
clusively to Botany, it would be proper to provide a room in these for the spe- 
cial Botanical Museum, while the space thus set free in the Biological Mu- 
seum would be devoted to the illustration of more general problems of Plant 
Life, and its relationship to the Animal Kingdom. 

2. An important addition to the Botanical Museum has been made by 
the purchase on the part of the Ontario Government of a large and interesting 
series of plants from Professor Macoun, Ottawa, which has been entrusted to 
the care of this Department. 

3. I have also to record a valuable addition to the Zoological side of the 
Museum, in the form of a number of cases illustrative of the Ornithology of 
the Province, being a collection formed by the late Sir Casimir Gzowski, and 
presented to the University by Lady Gzowski. 

4. The work of cataloguing the collections has progressed. It has 
been uder the charge of Dr. E. M. Walker, who has not only continued the 
card catalogue of Vertebrates, now nearly finished, but has rendered very 
valuable service, for which his previous studies have admirably fitted him, 
in arranging our collection of Insects. 

I desire to point out, however, that some permanent prevision must be 
made in the near future for the diagnosis, cataloguing, arrangement and dis- 
play of our Zoological Collections, the time of the various members of the 
staff being wholly occupied by the largely increased demands in teaching. 

5. Professor Henry Montgomerv, who was appointed Curator of the 
new Museums of Geology and Palaeontology, found that his services would not 
be required this year in connection with these, and undertook, at my request, 
to catalogue the synoptic collection of Fossils in this Museum. This work, 
the carrying out of which has been for some years a great desideratum, has 
now, thanks to Professor Montgomery's wide palaeontological knowledge 
been very satisfactorily completed. 

6. The storage and showcase for birds, for which an appropriation was 
made, is in course of completion, and will permit of a very desirable re-ar- 
rangement of our (at present much crowded ornithological collections. 



286 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



I have to express the hope that a similar appropriation will be made next 
year to carry out the next stage in the plan already submitted to yourself and 
the Board of Trustees, viz. : cases for the proper display of our collection of 
Fishes. 

7. The small appropriation for specimens has been expended, not in the 
rurchase of systematic collections, but in increasing the efficiency of the Mu- 
seum as an educative appliance primarily intended for the use of the students 
of the Department. 

8. I have, however, to report that the general public avails itself very 
largely of the circumstance that the Museum is open every afternoon, and that 
the number of daily visitors is on the increase. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
(Sgd.) R. Ramsay Wright. 

ADDENDUM H.— MEMORANDUM REGARDING GEOLOGICAL AND 
MINERALOGICAL MUSEUM. 

In view of the occupation of the new Science Building, it is necessary to 
consider the space available for museum purposes. Owing to the cutting 
aown of the plan, the wing intended for the Museum was omitted, and it has 
been arranged that a large lecture-room shall be used temporarily for mu- 
seum purposes. The ground space thus provided is about 50 by 80 feet. The 
palaeontological material now on hand, including the collection being trans- 
ferred to the department by Mr. B. E. Walker, is sufficient to fill the whole 
si ace. Other departments require accommodation as well, showing that the 
present provision is entirely insufficient. To provide for the present collec- 
tions and future expansion it is desirable that the museum wing should be 
erected as soon as possible. At present this material is stored in drawers 
and is being transferred into the new cases purchased during the past year; 
a large number more of similar cases will be required to properly exhibit the 
specimens already in the possession of the Department without any allowance 
for a much needed increase. The present museum accommodation is entire- 
ly inadequate for the needs of the Departments of Geology and of Mineralogy. 

(Sgd.) A. P. Coleman, 
Professor of Geology. 

ADDENDUM J.— UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO STUDIES. 

(To the President of the University of Toronto. 

Sir : I beg to submit the following report on University of Toronto 
Studies for the year 1904. 

1. The publications of the year were as follows : — 

History and Economics — Review of- Historical Publications, Vol. 8, 
edited by Messrs. Wrong and Langton. 

History and Economics — Municipal History of Manitoba, by A. C. 
Ewart. 

Municipal Government in the Northwest Territories, by S. M. Wickett. 

Municipal Institutions in the Province of Quebec, by R. Stanley Weir. 

Psychology — Combinations of colours and uncoloured light, by Miss S. 
A. Chown. Complementary relations of some systems of coloured papers, by 
Messrs. McGregor and Dix. Some photometrical measurements, by W. G. 
Smith. Stereoscopic vision and intensity, by T. R. Robinson. 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 287 



Physiology— Palaeochemsitry of the ocean, by Professor Macallum. 
-Geology — Geology of Michipicoten Island, by E. M. Burwash. 

Physical Science — A radioactive gas from crude petroleum, by E. F. 
Burton. 

Papers from the Chemical Laboratories — The Oxalates of Bismuth, bv F 
B. Allan. 

The Economic Admission of Steam to Water Gas Producers of the Lowe 
Type, by G. W. McKee. 

The Rate of formation of Iodates in Alkaline Solutions of Iodine, by E. 
€. L. Forster. 

Numerical values of certain functions involving e-x, by Professors W. 
Lash Miller and T. R. Rosebrugh. 

A Reaction whose rate is diminished by raising the temperature, by Clara 
C Benson. 

On the decomposition of Benzine at High Temperatures, by G. W. Mc- 
Kee. 

The Action of liquefied Ammonia on Chromic Chloride, by Professors W. 
K Lang and CM. Carson; Note on the Action of Methylamine on Chromic 
Chloride, by Professor W. R. Lang and E. H. Jolliffe. 

A mechanical model to illustrate the gas laws, by F. B. Kenrick. 

The rate of the reaction between iodic and hydriodic acid, by S. Dush- 
man. 

The electrolysis of acid solutions of aniline, by Lachlan Gilchrist. 

Some compounds of chromic chloride with substituted ammonias, by Pro- 
f' ssor W. R. Lang and C. M. Carson. 

2. The necessity of increased funds for the publication of the Studies 
was mentioned in last year's report. It may be added that two large 
volumes, the result of years of historical research, have been offered to the 
pcmmittee for publication during the ensuing twelve months. The authors 
are graduates of the University, and both former holders of the Mackenzie 
Fellowship in History and Political Science. The investigations also of 
which these volumes are the fruit were begun during their authors' respective 
tenures of the Fellowship. Both works, therefore, are the immediate result 
■of endowment for research in the University itself, and it is peculiarly fitting 
that the University should undertake their publication. But unless the 
grant for the Studies is considerably increased, or special funds for the pur- 
pose provided, it will be impossible to accept the books for publication. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) H. H. Langton, 

General Editor. 

ADDENDUM K.— MARINE AND LACUSTRINE BIOLOGICAL STA- 
TIONS OF CANADA. 

To the President of the University of Toronto : 

Sir : I beg to submit the following report as to the co-operation of mem- 
bers of the University in the scientific work carried on at these stations. The 
appropriation made by the Board of Trustees has been expended in meeting, 
in part or in whole, the expenses of workers not provided for out of the Do- 
minion appropriation. 

Marine Station at Malpeque. 

During the season of 1904, I again acted as Assistant Director of this 
Station, remaining there from the middle of June till the middle of Septem- 



288 THE REPORT OF THE No. 1> 



ber. Considerable progress was made with investigations into the life-his- 
tory of the oyster, which may lead to the establishment of experiments on a 
commercial scale on methods of oyster cultivation suitable to Canadian waters. 
Dr. J. H. Faull, Mr. L. C. Coleman, B.A., and Mr. J. Ross Murray, spent 
the greater part of the season there. Their travelling expenses were met out 
of the University grant. Messrs. Faull and Coleman were engaged on the 
Flora and Fauna, respectively, of the oyster bed, and Mr. Murray prepared 
a number of illustrations for a paper by myself on the Natural History of 
the Oyster. It is probable that the station will be located in 1905, at 
Gaspe, P.Q. 

Lacustrine Station at Georgian Bay. 

Dr. B. A. Bensley, who was in charge, reports as follows : 

The Georgian Bay Station was occupied from June 1st to September 5th. 
The following gentlemen attended during the whole or a part of the summer : 
— Messrs. A. G. Huntsman and Davidson Black, student-assistants from the 
University of Toronto, Mr. L. C. Coleman, B.A., assistant in Zoology (dur- 
ing the early part of the season), Mr. A. P. Gundry, B.A., Science Master of 
the Brantford Coll. Inst., Mr. J. M. Cole, M.A., of the Woodstock, Coll. Inst. 

The early part of the season was employed in experiments on the arti- 
ficial rearing of fishes in the Laboratory. Later Mr. Huntsman extended, 
mounted and arranged the collection of plants begun by the late Mr. Ander- 
son, in 1902, and submitted a report thereon for publication. Similar work 
on the birds was done by Mr. Black. Messrs. Cole and Gundry made col- 
lections of the Molluscs and aquatic insects. Mr. Huntsman also studied 
the feeding habits of the black bass in its early stages of growth, and repre- 
sentative organisms of the plankton. 

The appointments of the station have been greatly improved, chiefly by 
the addition of a pumping apparatus for the water supply, the addition of ap- 
pliances for microscopic technique, and the erection of a dwelling house for 
those engaged in the laboratory. 

An effort is being made to extend the usefulness of the station by invit- 
ing the science teachers of Ontario, many of whom are graduates of the 
University of Toronto, to attend the summer sessions. The advantages of 
a fully equipped laboratory with natural surroundings will, I believe, be 
appreciated and lead to the establishment of a permanent summer school. 

The expenses of Messrs. Coleman, Huntsman and Black were met out 
of the appropriation made for this purpose by the Trustees of the University. 

(Sgd.) R. Ramsay Wright. 

ADDENDUM L.— FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

I. Faculty of Arts. 

Receipts, 1903-4. 

Interest on purchase moneys $ 6/768 JO 

Interest on loans 12,759 97 

Interest on debentures 11,027 33 

Interest on bank balances 413 14 

Interest on cost of new building payable by Medical Faculty : , 

(a) On three-fifths of $125,000 3,000 00 

(b) On three-fifths of $50,000 1,200 00 

Rentals, University Park Lands 13,559 79 

Business properties 3,492 70 

School of Science site 925 00 



1904 " EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 289 



Biological Building 1,900 00 

City of Toronto (park) 6,000 00 

Sundry earnings 993 00 

Fees 59,850 40 

Legislative grant 7,000 00 

Wild land sales 1,347 8fi 



749 09 


2,204 69 


685 00 


1,125 60 


794 23 


1,235 25 


2,000 00 


290 00 


988 L'G 


7,786 04 


3,652 47 



$130,238 14 
Reserve for interest on Retirement Fund, Scholarship and other Trust Funds, $9,784 27 

Summary of Expenditure, 1903-4. 

1. Salaries and Pensions: 

(a) Salaries $96,443 20 

(fc) Pensions 1,200 00 

2. Bursar's Office 

3. Registrar's Office 

4. Vice-Chancellor's Office 

5. President's Office 

6. Law Costs 

7. General Incidentals 

8. Insurance 

9. Telephones 

10. Convocation Expenses 

11. Examinations 

12. Library 

13. Grounds 3,818 08 

J4. Main Building 6,545 65 

15. Biological Department: 

(a) Maintenance of Structure 2,963 37 

(b) Maintenance of Department 

!6. Physiological Department 

17. Psychological Department 

IS. Mathematics 

19. Political Science 

20. History 

21. Italian and Spanish 

22. Advertising (University) 

23. Incidentals (University) , 

24. University College Departments : 

Classics 

English 

French 

German 

Oriental Literature 

Stationery 

Printing 

Advertising 

Incidentals 

25. Gymnasium and Students' Union 1,946 45 

26. University Press 1,656 51 

27. Dining Hall 500 00 

28. Educational Association Reception 257 45 



3,626 


38 


7,400 00 


849 


04 


59 31 


6 


7:) 


236 89 


24 


88 


424 60 


157 


05 


180 05 


200 00 


30 00 


173 


46 


25 


00 


59 


15 


57 


5S 


65 


68 


242 


75 



Total Expenditure (exclusive of Departments sustained by 

Government) $150,661 41 

Details. 

Salaries. 
Bursar's Omce: 

Bursar $2,400 00 

Accountant 1,400 00 

Fees Clerk J700 00 

$4,500 00 



290 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



2. Library : 

Librarian .'. $2,200 00 

First Assistant 550 00 

Second Assistant 500 00 

Cataloguer 500 00 

Two Delivery Clerks ; 380 00 

Caretaker 500 00 



$4,630 00 
:3. University of Toronto, general: 

President (also paid as Professor of Physics) $2,300 00 

Vice-President 400 00 

Registrar 1,900 CO 

Registrar's Stenographer 450 00 

Registrar's Stenographer 200 00 

Bedell (with free house) 650 00 

Architect 100 00 

Janitor 500 00 

Engineer (with rooms and fuel) 576 00 

Fireman (salary at $35 per month for 8 months) 280 00 

Carpenter , 620 00 

Cleaners 763 00 

Messenger 163 00 



8,902 oa 

4. Pension : 

E. J. Chapman 1,200 00 



1,200 00 
3. Teaching Staff, etc., University of Toronto: 
(a) Modern History and Ethnology : 
Professor 3,200 00 



3,200 I 

(b) Political Science: 

Professor 3,200 00 

Professor of Constitutional and International Law and Constitutional 

History ■ 1,700 00 

Professor of Roman Law, Jurisprudence and History of English Law 875 00 

Lecturer (sessional) 1,000 00 



6,775 (.0 



(c) Mathematics: 

Professor 3,200 00 

Associate Professor 1,900 00 

Special Lecturer ...1,500 00 

Fellow 7 225 00 



6,825 00 



(d) Biology: 

Professor 3,200 00 

Lecturer in Zoology and Assistant Curator Museum 1,400 00 

Lecturer in Biology and Histology 1,100 00 

Lecturer and Laboratory Assistant (sessional) 250 00 

Class Assistants (sessional) 475 00 

Sub-Curator Museum 750 00 

Attendant and Caretaker 500 00 

Laboratory Attendant 185 20 

7,860 20 

;£>ub-Department of Botany: 

Lecturer in charge of sub-department 1,075 00 

Instructor (sessional) 500 00 

$9,435 20 



1904 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



291 



(e) Physiology: 
x ror gssoi* 

Professor (arrears)'".'. .""":' " ". ". ". ". . /.*/.".V." " ". . ".".".V. 3, ?[S 2J! 

Demonstrator (sessional) , Ann S 

class Assistants ;;;;;;;. ;;;;;;;;;;;. ';;:;;;;;;;;. :;..;;;;;•;:. 22500 



4,525 U0 



(J) Italian and Spanish: 

Professor (arrears)' '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. .'.'. "• 2, VR ??> 

Lecturer (9 months) ..'. ' iS nn 

Instructor in Italian loo W 



3,950 00 
(g) Philosophy: 

utTJ ::::::::: — -::—.— j^g 

Lecturer and Laboratory Assistant j'?™ n7> 

Laboratory Assistant (sessional) '...'.'.'."."'.'.'..